Re: Potential Employers and your not wanting them to contact previous employers

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    I've been an RN a little over a year, and the first 8 months was spent in home health.
    I absolutely hated that job, and though when I left the administrator told me I could count on her to give me a good referral...I will just say that in light of the goings on I saw in that place and how cut throat it was I would not want to count on it. It really is an experience I would rather forget and I wouldn't even want to put it on my job application and if I do, I would check "no" when they asked if they could contact the employer.
    This leaves me thinking I might have some splaining to do. So what do I tell them? I tried but it wasn't good enough...I couldn't take the stress of being expected to go out every single day of the week instead of just being able to do my job and GO HOME... I got so sick of running the wheels off my car...I got so sick of my cell phone ringing all the time...it made me stressed out and nervous to have to go in so many different peoples' houses...I got so sick of being blamed for things I had absolutely no control over...
    If I'm going to be truthful that is what I would have to say. I'm not someone who wants to sugar coat things, either, and I wonder if this will hurt me? I'm a what you see is what you get person and I want everything to be out front from the beginning. Problem is, I know this isn't always a smart thing to do, especially if they don't need to know every little detail. So how do you go about explaining why you don't want them to call one of your former employers without ruining it for yourself?
  2. 25 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Truthfully just let them call. Employers have to be very careful about what they say about you. Usually they just stick to the facts like did you call out alot, you were late... With the nurse shortage it is likely you will at least get an interview and a chance to present yourself in a better light. As far as your explanation as to why you left, less is always more. You can say with all honesty that the job just wasn't for you, not a good fit. They want specifics, say you weren't crazy about all the driving. Do not mention politics at all though, every job has that and employers never want to hear you bad mouth other employers. It'll only make you look like a potential difficult employee even if you are absolutely right. Most of all tell them why you think you will be an asset to them, why this job will be a better fit for you. Convince them that your experience at your past job showed that your talents were best suited at ----- and that you want to continue to develope your skills and knowledge at -----. You get the picture? You can always be honest and I think you need to be. The trick is to keep it positive not negative. For really what you are trying to do is to find the best fit for you for which your patients will only benefit, right? Good Luck!:spin:
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    I agree with withasmilelpn. Your best bet is to say, "the job wasn't a good fit." That can mean a million things. If they press for more information, you can tell them that because of ________ (fill in "hours, driving, scheduling" or whatever other aspect seems appropriate) you didn't feel that you could give your best to the job and you didn't like that feeling. You could even say that you feel you need a more structured setting than home health. That should work if you're trying to get into any kind of actual facility.

    In your case, the fact that you will have just had a baby makes for a natural break in your employment. That's about as personal as I would get. It doesn't seem that maternity leave would require a whole lot of additional explanation.

    Come across as confident and capable no matter how you feel.

    As far as letting them call a former employer, that's a judgment call. As the previous poster said, they're only supposed to be able to divulge certain information, but who knows what is actually said.

    I wish you the best.
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    I think that being honest without divulging personal feelings (i wasnt good enough) but saying that you did not feel that hh was for you is fine. hh is a very unique specialty and not for everyone, and a good recruiter or nurse manager that interviews you would know that! good luck!!
  6. 1
    Hey, it's your first job out of school, and you gave it a good try -- 8 months is more than many would have given it. So, yeah, I think it's appropriate to say "Just not for me."

    As far as what former employers can say, that's a matter of individual state. In Texas, a former employer can say or NOT say anything that they want, as long as it isn't slander -- meaning it's not an outright lie that can be easily proven wrong (like, 'she was always late' -- that can be disproven with a timesheet or witness reports, for instance). I found this out after calling several offices, including the state and federal Attorney Generals and Workforce Commissions. I had this employer in my past that was so ticked at me, that they just figured if they refused to respond to prospective employers' request to verify employment dates, that would somehow preclude me from ever getting a job in nursing again. They gave both me and the prospective employer the runaround, saying they can't release any information (not even to verify dates!) without my express written permission and refused to return any phone calls to either of us. I sent in the 'written permission' to no avail. After a few days of this, I just brought in my tax records proving that they had paid me for SOMETHING for those two years. Talk about VINDICTIVE!
    RN BSN 2009 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    This leaves me thinking I might have some splaining to do. So what do I tell them? I tried but it wasn't good enough...I couldn't take the stress of being expected to go out every single day of the week instead of just being able to do my job and GO HOME... I got so sick of running the wheels off my car...I got so sick of my cell phone ringing all the time...it made me stressed out and nervous to have to go in so many different peoples' houses...I got so sick of being blamed for things I had absolutely no control over...
    Just tell them that you discovered that Home Health Nursing was not for you. There's nothing wrong with telling them that, which is the truth. And it isn't for everybody.

    During the 19 years I worked in Home Health, I saw many a nurse and CNA run for the hills after working in the field for less than a month (and some quit after one day). The majority of them had no idea what they were getting themselves into, and chose to return to the "safe" confines of the hospital.

    As for me, I finally left Home Health last year for many of the reasons you have stated....in addition to the fact it had become so cutthroat. The incompetence was absolutely radiant at all levels, and I was sick of the "Good Ol' Boy" bureaucracy, which determined who got away with what...and who didn't. :angryfire

    You made the right choice.
  8. 0
    Well, I can tell you this. I had my first nursing job in a facility that I loved. Due to life circumstances, I left that job without notice. In fact I called out sick, and never came back. I always put them down as a previous employer, always say they can contact them, and I have never had a problem getting a job. It never even came up once in an interview. Just let them contact them. Ass a previous poster said, they can only state facts, and they *did* say they would give you a good reference, right?
    I would just let them contact them. Really.
  9. 0
    OT, I know, but when you mention "cut throat" in reference to home care, what do you mean? I worked home health, I did only work for one agency, I but I didnt experience this....
  10. 0
    You should have asked for a letter of reference. That way you can submit it with each application.
  11. 0
    Letter of Reference is a good idea, but any prospective employer who actually checks references is going to call, anyway, don't you think? I mean, I have had some say they really don't care what the previous employer had to say about me one way or the other, just that they had to call to verify dates of employment.

    Any yahoo with a computer and a printer could forge a letter of reference.


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