Racism in the workplace - page 8

Not to be a downer or anything but I have noticed some harsh things said about patients and sometimes even co workers in my unit when they think no one else can hear them. Has anyone else dealt with... Read More

  1. by   LADYFLOWER
    Quote from earle58
    what's even more upsetting is i would go to the bed of an pt. who was giving the nsg asst a hard time during a.m. care.
    the pt would be calling the n-word to the nsg assistant.
    the nsg assistant went ahead w/her care, even smiling at the pt.
    hrs later, same patients would still be using this word, addressed to some of the black staff.
    i'm not sure what i expected but i found myself getting flustered w/the staff.
    i understand they're in their workplace, but i found this whole 'n' calling highly upsetting.
    i seemed to be the most upset!!!
    i spoke with the offending pt(s) and told them their behavior was unacceptable.
    and these were hospice pts i was upset with!
    but i couldn't/wouldn't let it slide.
    and then i brought the targeted staff aside and told them that no one has the right to use that word with you. no one.
    they said "we hear it all the time".
    so complacent!
    i don't understand the apathy.
    i understand the complexity of racism in this country.
    but zero tolerance has to start somewhere, doesn't it???

    leslie
    my goodness!
    well i see your parent's raised a strong, intelligent person. you set a great example for nurses/people in general also...keep on keeping on!
  2. by   staygold
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    Personally - pretending race doesn't exist is not the same as creating equality. Race and racism are more than (just) stereotypes and individual prejudice.

    Racism is certainly a "learned" phenomenon - I don't think I've ever seen racist children*, have you?







    *: And by children, I mean kids. Sandbox. Not teenagers.
    Yes racism does exist among children. I've dealt with it first hand.When I say I've been dealing with racism my whole life I do mean my whole life.
  3. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from staygold
    Yes racism does exist among children. I've dealt with it first hand.When I say I've been dealing with racism my whole life I do mean my whole life.
    I would guess that Roy means that racism is learned. So little children only use racist words if they have been exposed to them. Little children soak up their environment. I think he means that before children have been exposed to racism they do not know it. Racism is learned. My Unitarian church has a class called "Unlearning Racism" where we examine our unconscious attitudes and our language.
  4. by   madwife2002
    Quote from staygold
    Yes racism does exist among children. I've dealt with it first hand.When I say I've been dealing with racism my whole life I do mean my whole life.
    That is so awful I just cannot abide rasicm. When I grew up I just played with my friends it didnt matter a tot what colour we were we were just friends.
  5. by   madwife2002
    My dd came home from school the other day and said 'I played with ****" when I asked her which little girl was that she said 'oh you know not the one with the white hair, she the one who's black'
    I felt she was describing her friend in a way that was so accepting.
  6. by   dorieabsLPN
    there are people from every race that are racist against some other race. It is a very sad world we live in when people are prejudiced each other based on looks,weight,race,hair color,religion ect. We can only control what we think and what we do. When someone says something derogatory against another person I have no problem speaking up and letting them know that I do not like it appreciate it or will I tolerate it. My child is half-white half-black but 100% human.
    it is pretty sad world when someone actually takes the time out of their day and puts forth the effort to hurt someone elses feelings and say hateful things to another person.
  7. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from staygold
    Yes racism does exist among children. I've dealt with it first hand.When I say I've been dealing with racism my whole life I do mean my whole life.
    I think what he meant is that it's clearly a nuture issue then a nature issue.

    People aren't inherently evil; it IS a learned behavior.

    I think there has been great improvement here, though. And, I think that is what Roy is speaking to. Integration in schools have had a positive effect. The idea of sitting in class together is no longer a 'call out the national guard' outrage.

    Look, things are consistently improving, and they probably will continue to do so. I grew up with the N word casually bandied about in my house. But then, my father had all kinds of prejudices, that being just one. To him, that wasn't even a character flaw.

    To me, it's a matter of pride that my oldest child, when he was in 6th or 7th grade, came home and asked me what that word meant. When I asked him how he heard it, he said, "All the black kids call themselves that all the time. The only thing I can figure out is that it's not a word a white person should use."

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f112/tea...se-138348.html

    In many cases, children do NOT know to be prejudiced anymore. That's because we have settled into a national pattern of self-segregation. Just like the aunt that mom hasn't spoken to in 10 yrs, it's just not an issue that comes up in many cases anymore. That being the case, many times for a child's first taste of integration - the public schools, many children just haven't been taught that there should be a difference in the way people are. I said many, not all, or even, most.

    And I don't necessary think that's all positive, either. It's good that many children aren't being passed down overt negative prejudices. But, by the same token, it's a shame that their instruction on this, one of this nation's most important issues and legacies, is a deafening silence.

    But that's where we are. Steady and slow improvement while both sides ignore the gulf in the middle, because we're safer on our own sides.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Aug 25, '06
  8. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    To me, it's a matter of pride that my oldest child, when he was in 6th or 7th grade, came home and asked me what that word meant. When I asked him how he heard it, he said, "All the black kids call themselves that all the time. The only thing I can figure out is that it's not a word a white person should use."
    I despise the N-word, regardless of who happens to use it. Blacks and whites both need to erase the word from their vocabularies, as the word has powerful connotations and an ugly history.
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I despise the N-word, regardless of who happens to use it. Blacks and whites both need to erase the word from their vocabularies, as the word has powerful connotations and an ugly history.
    That's another thing that boggles the mind. Why do African Americans use that word in popular songs, movies when it has such an ugly history.

    If they don't want people using that word, why do they use it. You'd think they wouldn't want to. I don't get it.

    Also ... other words start to get confusing also. I guess I'm out of touch but I was recently informed N*gro is also considered bad but ... I don't remember that always being the case.

    The rules seem to be always changing like ... blacks can use the "N" word but white people can't, and other words that, as far as I know used to be ok, may be bad also.

    You want to respect people's wishes but, these rules are kind of weird.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Aug 25, '06
  10. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from lizz
    That's another thing that boggles the mind. Why do African Americans use that word in popular songs, movies when it has such an ugly history.
    Not all black people use the N-word. I'm black and never use the term. Please keep that in mind prior to making blanket statements about an entire group of people.
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Not all black people use the N-word. I'm black and never use the term. Please keep that in mind prior to making blanket statements about an entire group of people.
    I didn't say all black people use the N-word. I said:

    Why do African Americans use that word in popular songs, movies when it has such an ugly history.

    That word is in A LOT of songs and movies featuring African American performers. I just don't get it.

    :typing
  12. by   Roy Fokker
    What's this got to do with racism in the workplace?
  13. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I despise the N-word, regardless of who happens to use it. Blacks and whites both need to erase the word from their vocabularies, as the word has powerful connotations and an ugly history.
    I linked above a very long thread that discussed in detail the current use of this word by our youts. The last several pages has my take on it.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.

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