Racism in the workplace - page 3

Not to be a downer or anything but I have noticed some harsh things said about patients and sometimes even co workers in my unit when they think no one else can hear them. Has anyone else dealt with... Read More

  1. by   balutpinoysabutuan
    :kiss i hope one day racism will be a thing of the past,too much chaos and war going around already.i hope peace will reign someday.GIVE PEACE A CHANCE.
  2. by   Multicollinearity
    Someone here mentioned that nobody wants to be PC. I do. I am one to defend being PC. Yes I am. It does get tiresome always being so careful. But since when is it wrong or unnecessary to make sure you aren't hurting those different than yourself? It's easy to snicker at things considered PC when you aren't the one who is hurt. Everytime I've heard people complain about a particular 'PC' thing, I've tried to place myself in the shoes of the subject, and I find a light bulb goes off in my head. I hope what I am trying to describe makes sense.

    I find being PC to be a practice of unlearning the subtle racism that is inherant in our lives and language. Tiresome sometimes, but necessary.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Aug 24, '06
  3. by   Annointed_RNStudent
    What does anyone think about hiring prejudice, it's not only with race, there are male nurses that don't get hired in OB just for being males, there are people that don't get jobs for being black, or being mexican, or being fat or being an ADN for that matter, Prejudice is everywhere, and it's just one more thing to add on top of everything in a profession where everyone needs to be working together!!!
  4. by   LeahJet
    Quote from kiyatylese
    Yes, I have heard some stuff also. It is not the obvious stuff, but like the little things, when they talk about the 'black patient' or the 'black coworker of their husbands'. That stuff bothers me. I never hear them say 'white patient'.
    In all fairness, I have heard black people (co-workers and pts/family) describe someone as "that white nurse" or "he was a white guy". I work in an almost 50/50 white/black environment and honestly.....I think it's just a matter of description. Like calling someone "the blonde lady".
  5. by   LeahJet
    Oh, and another side note........ I live in Mississippi....the most picked on state re: racism.
    I never...ok....NEVER.... hear the 'N' word in the workplace. Not among co-workers, pts, family...anyone.
    I have been back home in Miss. (from "up north") for a year and I have maybe heard the 'N' word twice. From old people.
    I have had a black co-worker call me a cracker-a$$...(in jest).... and I laughed.
  6. by   SharonH, RN
    I used to work with a (White) nurse who was not only openly racist towards Blacks and Hispanics, but she seemed to hate everybody who was not middle-class and WASP. She made comments all the time about "white trash", "junkie low-life" and she was borderline abusive to some of the elderly with dementia. She was so confident that she had a right to treat people any way she wanted that she bragged about it. Basically she was a bully who went after anyone she perceived as powerless. I got in her face after I caught her telling a little old lady to "shut up" and that she was disturbing the other patients with her constant moaning. I knew that the lady was mourning because she got the news while in the hospital that her adult daughter died of cancer. For my confrontational attitude, I got "angry nurse" label. What really upsets me is that she was allowed to retire a couple of years later at her leisure. Apparently everyone else gave her a pass. It happens.
  7. by   leslie :-D
    sadly, for as much racism there is, apathy is just as pervasive.

    leslie
  8. by   SimonJester
    "I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed; 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'" "I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. " - Dr. M L King Jr

    I was born 13 years after this event. I have to believe in some way we are moving closer towards this dream then further away from it. I whole heartily believe in Dr Kings dream and I try to teach my children the principals it embodies.

    It must start with every new generation and I hope some day racisms will be a long forgotten era of the past.
  9. by   zahryia
    Quote from LeahJet
    In all fairness, I have heard black people (co-workers and pts/family) describe someone as "that white nurse" or "he was a white guy". I work in an almost 50/50 white/black environment and honestly.....I think it's just a matter of description. Like calling someone "the blonde lady".
    Yes, Leah. You're right. Saying 'the black patient' in of of itself is not a bad thing. I guess if it was said in an indignant or derisive tone, someone might read more into it.

    And even if it's not said in a bad tone, some people might do a double take, only because we are(some black folks, not all) kind of used to being referred in a bad light, so it's almost like we're trying to detect 'it' or look out for it. I don't know how else to explain it. It's a sensitive issue but I don't get personally don't get offended by it.
  10. by   LeahJet
    Quote from zahryia
    Yes, Leah. You're right. Saying 'the black patient' in of of itself is not a bad thing.
    I would be more likely to distinguish my "white patient" because the majority of my patients are black.
    But as far as nurses calling their pt's white and black.... that's rarely done. Even in report, I don't say "a 44 y/o black male"....it's just "a 44 y/o male"
  11. by   BeachPrincess
    My parents and grandparents marched too long and put up with too much for me to take things for granted.

    I totally agree with this!
  12. by   Rnandsoccermom
    I work in a very diverse setting, patients and staff. There are times when I am the only person of "non-color" on my shift. I have worked there for 14 years. We for the most part all get along quite well, most people realizing we are all working to take care of PEOPLE of all races, colors and creeds. We have had a few bad eggs, and people don't like the BEHAVIOR. Those people are not well liked and treated as such.

    We had a patient over the weekend tell a staff member that she needed to "go back to where you came from where you make $6.00 per hour. You don't belong here, I do". The RN was Filapino, the patient black. ALL of the staff members were upset. Everyone thought that the patient was disrespectful and they all stuck together on this. A quote from a CNA was "we all work too hard for him to say some s*** like that".

    Racism is everywhere, we all have to decide if we are going to feed into it or not.
  13. by   geniann
    In my wing, racism seems to go both ways- Too bad people forget that NONE of us are true americans- only American Indians can say "go back to where you came from". All of our ancestors came over on a boat. I treat everyone equal- no matter what color-Since I live in Southern florida, we have quite a mixture of culture- mostly hispanics, jamaican and blacks. Color is only skin deep- we are all the same underneath. Too bad so many forget that!

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