Quitting Nursing permanently

  1. How can we quit being a nurse forever? Do we just have to inform BON and voluntary surrender the license? I'm just burnt out and I feel like nursing is not for me. I don't enjoy it and everytime I come home, there's always worries if I've done all my work perfectly. Also, i don't want to sign the agreement with BON order because it's not worth fighting for, the pressure, the stress and not being happy. I just want to surrender my license without agreeing to do classess, working under supervision and other BS. Can we still work as an elderly sitter, taking care of their needs without a license? I mean, non-medical caregiving jobs like doing household needs and their companionship.I need some advice based on what you know.
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  2. 23 Comments

  3. by   NurseCard
    Yeah, I suppose you could contact the BON and tell them that you
    wish to surrender your license.

    Your post suggests that there are other things going on. Are you in
    trouble with the BON? What's going on? There are lots of things that
    can be worked through before giving up the license that you have
    worked so hard for.

    Also, there are so many different areas of nursing, you may find
    something that is less stressful and that you enjoy more. You
    could do private duty as an RN and do some of the things that
    you alluded to in your post. Be one on one with an elderly
    or disabled patient, taking care of their medical needs.

    Think you are rushing into this a bit...
  4. by   BurntRN1
    Yes, I have trouble with BON and haven't signed an agreement yet to do classess, etc. instead of fighting for my license or going through their hoops, I would just surrender it. I just feel that, from the very first day of being an RN plus my bad experience with other ******* RNs, this is not what I want. I'm not happy. I don't wanna live with a lot of worries when I come home especially when going to work. I just don't want the responsibility. I know I can make more in private caregiving because I know the family although I work more hours than my current job. My job right now doesn't pay much as an entry level plus too much stress and pressure involve. Also, my job doesn't have benefits at all.
    Last edit by BurntRN1 on Mar 15
  5. by   Davey Do
    Welcome to AN.com, BurntRN!

    It sounds like you're under quite a bit of stress at this time, overwhelmed with feelings due to an excessive number of problems. Now is not the best time to make a major career changing decision. It's difficult to tell the forest from the trees, and a decision made now could be a long term plan to that which may be a short term problem- in other words, career suicide.

    You've begun a problem-solving process by your endeavor to gain data in order to brainstorm and come up with the best solution. The solution to this problem should not be made with great temerity. Dealing with this problem should be like eating an elephant: One bite at a time.

    Nursecard was able to glean more information from you in an attempt to assist you in dealing with this problem. You're on the road to a solution and you've got resources at your disposal which will assist you in finding a long term plan your temporal progeny will be comfortable with.

    Hang in there, man.
    Last edit by Davey Do on Mar 15 : Reason: typo
  6. by   Davey Do
    Quote from BurntRN1
    I have trouble with BON
    Okay. What's the trouble with the BON?
  7. by   dishes
    Suggest you speak to a lawyer who is familiar with nursing licensing issues, you can find one through TAANA. It's possible that the BON will not accept a voluntary surrender of a license from a nurse who failed to comply with their disciplinary requirements. Instead they may list your license as revoked and make the reasons why public information. A revoked license may effect your ability to obtain any type of work that involves working with vulnerable people, including working as a sitter for the elderly.
  8. by   BSNbeDONE
    You mentioned "classes" that the BON suggested you do. These wouldn't be alcohol or drug-related rehabilitation-type classes, would they?
  9. by   Been there,done that
    Newsflash---- Most RN's are not "happy" with their job. Most people are not "happy" with their job.
    Jobs are not designed to make you happy, they provide a salary, period.

    The private caregiving job will not last for long, clients either die or the situation changes. Any private duty job without professional licensure will pay peanuts.

    You spent a great deal of effort getting that license, spend some more keeping it.
  10. by   BurntRN1
    Like taking classes ,etc. but no drugs or alcohol involved
  11. by   BurntRN1
    We can't be forced to be into something when we realized that it's not for us, right?
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Jobs are not designed to make you happy, they provide a salary, period.
    Bingo! Our jobs should provide us with income. Our personal lives should provide us with happiness. I see employment as a means to an end and nothing more.

    People who look to a job to make them happy and fulfilled in a transcendental manner seem to be the ones who grow the most disillusioned over the years. Our expectations must be realistic.

    There is a saying: Those who expect nothing will never be disappointed...
  13. by   BurntRN1
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Newsflash---- Most RN's are not "happy" with their job. Most people are not "happy" with their job.
    Jobs are not designed to make you happy, they provide a salary, period.

    The private caregiving job will not last for long, clients either die or the situation changes. Any private duty job without professional licensure will pay peanuts.

    You spent a great deal of effort getting that license, spend some more keeping it.

    A private duty job with or without a cna/rn license pays better than I get paid. I know some friends working a private duty, although they work more hours but less pressure, they make $$$ in one week than I'm currently making in two weeks. But you have to be in a big city. Also, I just called the BON in that state confirming that I can work as a private caregiver or companioship including meal preparation, as long as I'm not holding any license. I just have enough with people I'm working with, the pressure and the stress. It's physical and mental draining.
  14. by   BSNbeDONE
    Quote from BurntRN1
    A private duty job with or without a cna/rn license pays better than I get paid. I know some friends working a private duty, although they work more hours but less pressure, they make $$$ in one week than I'm currently making in two weeks. But you have to be in a big city. Also, I just called the BON in that state confirming that I can work as a private caregiver or companioship including meal preparation, as long as I'm not holding any license. I just have enough with people I'm working with, the pressure and the stress. It's physical and mental draining.
    So, why no just take the classes, keep the license, and just look for another job outside of healthcare? Years later, you may decide to try nursing again. Get the license back in good standing first, then leave to pursue something entirely different, if that's what you truly want. Just because you have a nursing license, it doesn't mean that you have to work as a nurse.

    Another key point to consider is that other individuals may be jealous of you having an RN license. Until you've actually eyeballed their pay checks and walked minute for minute in their shoes leading up to payday, I wouldn't believe a word they told me if I were you. Right now, you're at a higher level than they are...too big for your britches, they may think. People love to see others brought down to their levels. You have the greater potential for advancement than they do and I'm sure they know this. As an RN, you could work your way up to Chief Nursing Officer of a hospital, then the $$$, compared to $$$$$$, won't look so impressive, will it?

    Think long and hard about what you're about to throw away.

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