Questions to ask a nurse you are shadowing

  1. Hello all,
    I am a newly registered nurse in Colorado and have been through many interviews already with no luck, I also got the chance to shadow a nurse as part of the interview process and didn't get the job. My feedback was that I didn't ask enough questions while shadowing. I have another shadow opportunity coming up and wanted some advice on different types of questions to ask! I asked the questions that I had, HELP!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   BSNbeDONE
    I smell a set-up. You, a new grad, didn't get the job because you didn't ask enough questions?? You probably won't get the next one because they deemed you to be clueless by asking too many questions. Wow!!! What's next? If they are not hiring, they should stop interviewing.

    Hopefully you'll land an interview at the right facility soon. (((hugs)))
  4. by   cleback
    How do you feel about the acuity on the unit? Is it manageable with the nurseatient ratio?

    How often do you get a lunch break?

    Do you staff other units regularly?

    Can you describe your typical patient population?

    Do your charge nurses take an assignment?

    Are there extra hours to pick up usually?

    How does your unit handle low census days?


    I guess I don't know what kind of questions to ask as I've never shadowed as part of the interview process, but those would be the questions I'd want to know from staff as a prospective employee.
  5. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from jmckinnon
    Hello all,
    I am a newly registered nurse in Colorado and have been through many interviews already with no luck, I also got the chance to shadow a nurse as part of the interview process and didn't get the job. My feedback was that I didn't ask enough questions while shadowing. I have another shadow opportunity coming up and wanted some advice on different types of questions to ask! I asked the questions that I had, HELP!
    It probably has less to do with how many questions you ask and more to do with how well you connect with the person you're shadowing. I'd probably go in without a plan and follow the other nurse's lead. Be a social chameleon.
  6. by   JKL33
    Agree with Sour Lemon. Be careful "believing" the excuse the previous place gave you for not hiring you. You'll just sabotage yourself by asking too many/wrong questions this next time around. Seek to be genuine and to make a connection with the person you're shadowing - not a bad idea to start right off by thanking him/her for having you tag along (you'd be surprised how many people are very self-focused and don't do such a simple thing as saying "thank you").

    Good luck!
  7. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from JKL33
    Agree with Sour Lemon. Be careful "believing" the excuse the previous place gave you for not hiring you. You'll just sabotage yourself by asking too many/wrong questions this next time around. Seek to be genuine and to make a connection with the person you're shadowing - not a bad idea to start right off by thanking him/her for having you tag along (you'd be surprised how many people are very self-focused and don't do such a simple thing as saying "thank you").

    Good luck!
    "Self-focused." Is that what they're calling rude these days...?
  8. by   llg
    I suspect that "not asking enough questions" is another way of saying that you didn't seem very enthusiastic about the job ... interested in the field ... happy about being there ... etc. It probably also means not establishing a good relationship with the nurse you shadowed: she wasn't impressed by you.

    So my recommendations are:

    1. Follow the advice above about forming a good relationship with the person you shadow. Say "thank you" etc.

    2. Be sure to appear interested in the type of work they do ... the type of patients ... etc. Too many job applicants ask only about "what's in it for them" -- pay, lunch breaks, floating to other units, and other aspects of the job that is about what benefits/burdens part of the job. People who are doing the hiring want to hire people interested in doing the type of work they have to offer. They want to hire nurses who are interested in that type of patient, that level of care, the common patient problems seen, etc. So ask about those things -- the patients, their needs, resources available, their outcomes, the community the hospital serves, etc. Show that you are most interested in doing that type of work with that type of patient. That's what people doing the hiring want to see -- that you truly want THIS type of job and will stay a while.

    3. Interact with the patients (and other staff) as appropriate. Smile at people, introduce yourself, touch a few patients, etc. Show them that you are warm and caring -- and that you can quickly establish a warm, positive relationship with the patients and coworkers. If a patient lets you observe a procedure, say "thank you."

    Overall -- remember what the Hiring Manager is looking for. She's looking to hire a nurse who is genuinely interested enough in THIS job to do a good job at it and stay on that unit. Show them your interest in the patients and the work itself so that you appear worth the investment the unit will have to make to orient you. Show them that you will fit in well with the staff and be a friendly and competent coworker for the future.
  9. by   MzJohnson0186
    Hello. I am a new nurse (LPN), I am currently in school for my RN. Since I started working, I have been treated like crap. No one wants to orientate you, they lie, cheat, ans steal from residents. They placed me on the cart after 2 days of orientation that no one wanted to do. I taught myself things, ways to get my job done. But I noticed that the facilities want you to do things that can cause you your license. When you refuse, they try to fire you. I placed a two weeks notice and they said that I did not. What's the point?
  10. by   brownbook
    Agree with all. The idea of being overly enthusiastic, chipper, excited, little Miss Chirpy, etc. (don't over do it too much), makes sense.

    It wasn't a nursing job, but once I asked why I wasn't hired for a job and was told it didn't seem like I really wanted that job, (which actually I really did). Next interview I acted all enthusiastic and got the job. These were just menial secretarial jobs.

    More down to earth, what drugs are most commonly used on that unit comes to mind.

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