Questions for Jehovah's Witness

  1. 0
    I am getting some info on a medication that is a blood component and want to properly say how to ask pts for their religious practices. Would you say "Ask pt is they are a practicing Jehovah's Witness" or maybe "ask pt if they are an observing Jehovah's Witness" Or just ask pt if they are a Jehovah's Witness? Is one way proper, while another is improper? Thanks!
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  3. 20 Comments so far...

  4. 17
    I would ask the pt if he or she has any objection to receiving a blood product, and leave out religion, unless the patient brings it up. Just inform the patients and leave the decisions up to them.
    kenderella89, elkpark, bebbercorn, and 14 others like this.
  5. 9
    Not all Jehovah's Witnesses refuse blood products and not everyone who doesn't want blood products is a Jehovah's Witness, so it's better to ask the question more directly (describe the medication containing blood products and ensure they consent to receiving it, just like you would for any other medication).
    elkpark, man-nurse2b, bebbercorn, and 6 others like this.
  6. 2
    Just ask if they are okay with getting blood or blood products. There are people opposed to it that are not Jehovah
    cardiacfreak and BrnEyedGirl like this.
  7. 4
    I always ask if there are any religious or cultural beliefs or practices that I neec to be aware of to best provide their care.
    LL143KnB, cardiacfreak, Esme12, and 1 other like this.
  8. 3
    I know you're not asking for a grammar lesson, but you're getting one anyway.

    A
    patient is not a they. I know people say it all the time, but they is plural, and is not an acceptable substitute for an (unknown gender) singular. When you find yourself about to say or write, " I asked my patient about their symptoms," if you aren't asking the patient about the symptoms of a bunch of other people, you must recast the sentence to be grammatically correct. "I asked the patient about her symptoms," or "I asked the patients about their symptoms," or, "To find out about the children's illness, I asked him about their symptoms."

    So. You would say, "Ask patients if they have any preferences or beliefs about receiving blood or blood products" (because even among the JW population there are variations), or "Ask the patient about preferences or beliefs regarding receiving blood or blood products."
  9. 1
    Quote from GrnTea
    I know you're not asking for a grammar lesson, but you're getting one anyway.

    A patient is not a they. I know people say it all the time, but they is plural, and is not an acceptable substitute for an (unknown gender) singular. When you find yourself about to say or write, " I asked my patient about their symptoms," if you aren't asking the patient about the symptoms of a bunch of other people, you must recast the sentence to be grammatically correct. "I asked the patient about her symptoms," or "I asked the patients about their symptoms," or, "To find out about the children's illness, I asked him about their symptoms."

    So. You would say, "Ask patients if they have any preferences or beliefs about receiving blood or blood products" (because even among the JW population there are variations), or "Ask the patient about preferences or beliefs regarding receiving blood or blood products."
    You are too funny GrnTea. I love to debate with you, and I love some of your posts which just give me a good laugh sometimes. I am always careful in formal writing to be grammatically correct. My opinion is that it is ok to be informal while speaking with someone. But, where do we draw the line? Some view this site as a way to quickly communicate (use text speak, accidentally say "there instead of "they're....) While it grates on my nerves a little when I see such writings as "alot," I just let it go. Mostly because I find that I myself make the silliest of errors occasionally despite having been raised with excellent grammatical skills and took advanced grammar as well as in other languages at NIU. Maybe we should have a section on allnurses about grammar and how poor grammar can hinder job opportunities.
    GrnTea likes this.
  10. 0
    Well written sleepyrn
  11. 1
    Any truly practicing Jehovah's Witness will likely have made their beliefs known at the beginning of whatever medical procedure is to be done. And, if you are still going to ask specifically "are you one of Jehovah's Witnesses?"should do just fine.
    Honestly, I'm sure no one will care if you say it differently. Having said that it drives me a tiny bit crazy when I hear "she's a Jehovah Witness"
    OCNRN63 likes this.
  12. 2
    Well, some people think correcting the grammar of others is poor etiquette.


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