Questions about going back into hospital nursing

  1. This might be long as I have a lot of questons about my future. I am an RN/BSN who has been out of work for 12 years raising my family. The last time I worked in the hospital was in 1987. I've done some community type nursing before totally quitting to stay home with my kids. Kids are older now, and I am really missing working outside the home. I keep thinking of returning to hospital nursing, but wonder if anybody will hire me. I've kept my license current all of these years, and took the RN refresher course a year ago. I have worked med-surg, ortho/neuro, and rehab.(This was in the 1980's). I know that many things have changed, but I was a good nurse and loved it. I'm not sure which area I would like to work in, though. Neuro/rehab was most enjoyable, but do I need to work med-surg again to get my skills back up? I have friends in the field who are pushing me to work towards post op units, but I really don't have any critical care experience other than an occasional floating to the units, again many years ago. I'm not sure if I am that interested in tele, although that would probably help me be able to go in other directions in the future.
    How much of a nursing shortage is there really? Would I be easily hired, even though it's been so long since I've worked in the hospital? I have other questions about resumes and applying for jobs, but I'll save those for another post. Thanks for any insight/ advice anyone might have. :uhoh21:
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   stidget99
    I think that you won't know the job availability unless you try. There really is a nursing shortage....worse in some areas than others so your chances of getting hired are pretty good as long as you are in good standing w/ the BON.

    I would say that you should go for an area that you most enjoyed and have most experience with (Neuro/Rehab). If you must "do your time" on a med/surg unit, then you should only need a short time and then you could transfer to Neuro/Rehab.

    Whatever you decide to do........good luck to you.
  4. by   SandraJean
    I'm sorry, what is the BON?
  5. by   RN4NICU
    Board of Nursing
  6. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from SandraJean
    I'm sorry, what is the BON?
    Board of Nursing (state)
  7. by   SandraJean
    Duh!!! Why didn't I get that? :chuckle

    Any more advice on what floor I should seriously consider?
  8. by   KatieBell
    Taking the refresher class is going to be a huge bonus to you!!! You will probably get hired much faster just from doing this.

    I'd call the hospitals, rather than doing the on line applications and explain your situation, and the recruiter may know of a good place for you. Yes, sometimes it seems recruiters are only trying to fill spots, but the good ones know if they put someone in the "right" position, the person will likely stay. The recruiter will know which manager is going to be most receptive/supportive to someone in your situation. I think if you are intersted in Neuro/Rehab, that is a good place to go. Although there is still a school of thought that everyone should do med-surg after graduation (or perhaps for a refresher for you), I think you will encounter enough stuff on a Neuro unit to "get your skills up" But, I'd go to the place where after an interview, you feel most comfortable and confident.

    It's GREAT to have you back in nursing!!!!
  9. by   SandraJean
    Thanks for the replies! Neuro/Rehab does seem the most appealing at this time. I'm looking for a .4 or .5 evening position. So far, the online listings don't have anything except for a .5 nights on rehab. I used to work nights when I was single and it was OK except for that fuzzy sensation in your head and never quite rested enough feeling. Now I have a busy, loud family (hubby included) and I just know that I'd have a very difficult time trying to sleep during the day hours, not while the kids were in school, but on the weekends, especially. I don't want to sound too picky when I am applying, but would it look too picky to say that is what I am looking for? Would I send in a resume and cover letter with that request? Thanks again for any sage advice.
  10. by   KatieBell
    I personally think it is better to call, rather than send in materials. The naterials can be ignored (for a variety of reasons), but it is hard to ignore a telephone call.
    Tell the recruiter what you want. It is not very picky at all. Again, the recruiter knows the managers, and just might say, "Well, there is only a full time position open, but I know Mary-Jo, the manager in Rehab might be able to split the position...let me ask her". On top of that, the recruiter is aware of things before they get posted on the web site, so might have more information for you.

    Then, of the telephone, ask the recruiter hwo she would like you to proceed. This way, you have a person to send your materials "attention to", and you can refer to your phone conversation in the cover letter, making the letter a little easier to write, because you can say, "as we discussed, I am most interested in XYZ, but would also be enthusiastic about a different option"

    Wow, this was a long post. I hope it is helpful, and not just mindless blathering.
    Good Luck

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