Question For Ya!!! - page 2

by BBRANRN2013

1,421 Views | 16 Comments

I have a question. I am a RN student, I wont be done until August 2013. I'm looking for a job to gain some kind of healthcare experience that will help me in the long run. I recently interviewed and got an offer to be can RNT... Read More


  1. 0
    Wow all your replies are absolutely wonderful....that's why I'm addicted to this site...lol. Well I was thinking to as many of u have said that if I take the ED job at least my foot is in the door at the hospital. I don't have to be an RN in the ED when I graduate but just working in that hospital will hopefully give me some kind of advantage. Slot of their jobs on their website say for internal candidates only. This is why I was leaning towards the ED job as well. And I too think that 4 nights a week is slot with school...plus I volunteer and my kids school two days a week. I don't know what to do!!!!!!
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    I work 5 nights a week and am in school. While it is definitely hard it is very doable. I think you should try it out and then if it becomes too much you can always quit. I would try to work nights where you don't have to be at school in the morning. It VERY difficult to adjust to sleeping during the day and being awake at night. I have been working nights for 2 years and my schedule easily gets messed up and my sleep cycle gets completely thrown off. If you could find opportunities for during the day or evening that would be better.
  3. 0
    The RNT position sounds like you will be doing more direct patient care and working on your skills. They may be just nurse aide type skills (basic patient care including feeding, bathing, toileting, skin care, I&O, checking blood sugars) or they may let you do a little more (some facilities allow their techs to insert foleys or start IVs...it just depends on the facility); however, I find any type of job that gives you patient experience prior to graduating from nursing school is INVALUABLE. I worked as a PCNA (patient care nursing assistant) for awhile and then I landed a job as a NT (nurse tech) at another hospital. Not only did I learn a lot from working both jobs (I worked with a bunch of wonderful nurses who loved to teach!) it gave me the opportunity to work on my skills. As a NT, I could start IV's, draw blood, insert foleys, administer enemas, do dressing changes and perform trach care/suctioning on top of basic duties. I did more of those "skills" working as a NT than I did in nursing school! And working those jobs made me feel more comfortable in a hospital setting and with talking to patients. When I first started nursing school, I was so awkward when it came to communicating with my patients and I was sooooooo shy - a wallflower, if you will - but working as a PCNA/NT prior to my RN really made a difference.

    As for the ER registration specialist, that is another good way to get your foot in the door, but it seems like potential employers like actual clinical experience (working as a tech or aide or whatever).

    Back to the RNT position...you mentioned 4 nights...are they flexible with that? The two jobs I worked were very flexible - I worked PRN for both of them. The PCNA job was a minimum of 2 shifts/month and the NT job was a minimum of 4 shifts/month with at least 1 weekend shift (friday, saturday or sunday) and we were allowed to come in for 4 or 6 hours, and at "odd" times (there were times where I would come in at 4 or 5pm and work until 11pm because of my school schedule). I made sure that I put school first but at the same time maintained my work commitment. It wasn't that difficult to juggle both. Being a PCNA/NT also meant that I sometimes had to do 1:1's which were nice. Some patients were a handful but others were okay, and that gave me extra time to get some studying/homework done.
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    They were hiring for a 40 hr week, but I told them I'm in clinical Monday's from 4-10 p so I really didn't want to work 11-7 after being in clinical all night. They were really nice about that and told me I could do the 32 hours a week instead. They told me at the interview that they would do whatever it took to get me thru RN school, so I'm sure they are really flexible. I do like the fact that I would get patient care experience b/c I'm like you, a little shaky when it comes to patient communication.

    As for the ER job, they told me they would cross train me in the trauma bays. Wouldn't I be doing vitals and such when they come in. And I'm thinking I would get to witness some things I have never seen before. I don't know, I'm confused! I guess I'll figure it out eventually!

    Thanks a million.
  5. 0
    I still say go for the RNT position. Sounds like you'll get more hands-on experience going that route; however, the decision is up to you!
  6. 0
    My worth. Take the ER job. Sure the rehab is hands-on, but honestly I don't think tech experience (vital signs, making beds, etc) will really help you land a new grad RN position especially in this economy. I was an LPN for years before recently becoming an RN and that hasn't helped me very much in landing a hospital new grad job. Right now a new grad is basically just a new grad, only RN experience truly matters. I think getting to know the people in the hospital system would be more advantageous to you. Lots of times, it's who you know. And at the hospital you'll get to know many people. Also the hours are more conducive to your schooling and family, which is the top priority.
    The decision is clear to me.
  7. 0
    Quote from dream'n
    My worth. Take the ER job. Sure the rehab is hands-on, but honestly I don't think tech experience (vital signs, making beds, etc) will really help you land a new grad RN position especially in this economy. I was an LPN for years before recently becoming an RN and that hasn't helped me very much in landing a hospital new grad job. Right now a new grad is basically just a new grad, only RN experience truly matters. I think getting to know the people in the hospital system would be more advantageous to you. Lots of times, it's who you know. And at the hospital you'll get to know many people. Also the hours are more conducive to your schooling and family, which is the top priority.
    The decision is clear to me.
    That's what I was thinking....thanks again for all the great advice....I'll let you all know what I choose!!!!!


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