Psych Pts are Found throughout the hospital. 5 quick tips... - page 4

Do psych patients scare you? You scare them more. That’s been my experience both in and out of inpatient psychiatry. Reality is patients with psychiatric disorders appear on any unit. Nursing... Read More

  1. by   WorldTraveler50
    Is their anyone familiar with Oregon? Do we have any northwestern nurses here?
  2. by   Dogen
    Quote from WorldTraveler50
    Is their anyone familiar with Oregon? Do we have any northwestern nurses here?
    Mmmmmaybe...
  3. by   WorldTraveler50
    Quote from Dogen
    Mmmmmaybe...
    Oregon is an easy state to work in. Not many Oregonians get sick. They're all out riding their bikes and hiking.Theres no such thing as an Oregonian having an emergency.
  4. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from WorldTraveler50
    Oregon is an easy state to work in. Not many Oregonians get sick. They're all out riding their bikes and hiking.Theres no such thing as an Oregonian having an emergency.
    Oh yeah there is, just look outside Portland and the I-5 corridor and you'll find all sorts of pathology. Actually, you'll find it everywhere...we aren't all vegan outdoorsy types. LOL
  5. by   Dogen
    Quote from WorldTraveler50
    Oregon is an easy state to work in. Not many Oregonians get sick. They're all out riding their bikes and hiking.Theres no such thing as an Oregonian having an emergency.
    The need for two level I trauma centers and a new psychiatric emergency hospital suggest we have our fair share of emergencies. The average wait time in an ED is something like two hours in the Portland area. Those people can't all be Californians or Vancouverites.

    There are also so many psych jobs in Oregon it's amazing. You can write your own meal ticket and get loan forgiveness in small towns all over this state if you're a psych services provider.
  6. by   WorldTraveler50
    I could definitely see the need for psych with as many meth addicts that I have met and most of them that I have met have severe mental illnesses.

    Portland is a very nice emerald city. Great view from the pittock mansion. Ever tried McMenamins? I find the people very friendly and very liberal compared to Utah where I just moved to.

    I enjoy road-tripping everywhere and it's a good way to meet all kinds of people.

    Have you ever driven out to John Day, Dayville and Fossil. Good way to see what it's like to be back in time. No cell service, no hospitals!! No walmart!
    It for sure is a beautiful drive! I'm on a roadtrip as we speak.
    Last edit by WorldTraveler50 on Apr 8, '16
  7. by   Farawyn
    Quote from WorldTraveler50
    The grass is always greener!
    Why did you ask about Oregon? *being nosey*
  8. by   WorldTraveler50
    Because I was on vacation there and wanted to know how the health system is out there.
  9. by   WorldTraveler50
    Quote from Farawyn
    Why did you ask about Oregon? *being nosey*
    I'm considering moving to Portland. I hope they're great hospitals that won't treat me poor like the hospital in Florida. They said I don't care of my health so don't bother coming back! That's like a death wish!

    My blood glucose was 700 and I told them all I had was filet mignon and they yelled at me!
  10. by   verene
    Quote from WorldTraveler50

    I do know 1:1 has to be done for hospital risk management but what's the sitter to watch if it was toxic chemical Ingestion? It's unlikely I have a gallon of cleaning fluids in my hospital room. If a patient didn't attempt with a sharp object, what makes them think they're gonna hurt themselves with sharp objects if the attempt was poison ingestion? Honestly, what is their for the sitter to watch for?
    As a CNA I am semi-frequently a sitter for SI patients. Most of them are not still a risk to themselves (though a few still have been) once in the hospital. However, hitting rock bottom is very difficult and sometimes things can change rapidly. While I know I am in the room from a liability perspective to prevent "what ifs" I am also there to support and advocate for my patients. My role is to provide support and compassion to someone who is likely feeling emotions ranging from fear to shame and anxiety to anger and help them feel heard and understood. I also can assist them in bringing concerns to other members of the care team and generally do my best to make the hospital experience more humane and less anxiety inducing.

    Quote from WorldTraveler50
    Not all psych patients are just "psych' patients. Many normal people just hit rock bottom..

    Perhaps that patient went through a divorce, lost a loved one, etc

    Suicide is not a mental illness. Depression is and a depressed patient is not just a psych patient, they are a depressed patient! A patient who is sad is in no way violent.

    Schitzophrenics can go violent if u press the wrong buttons.
    Individuals with mental illness are just people - and many people who may outwardly appear fine are very ill, and many times meeting those who outwardly appear "crazy" are very functional within their own capacities. It helps to meet people where they are at - where ever that may be.

    ANYONE can become violent if the wrong buttons are pressed - depression, schizophrenia, or no mental illness at all. Part of why it is important to build rapport and trust with ALL patients no matter who they are. Also to never take for granted that a patient is going to be safe - I've had any number of non-psych patients who seem just fine, (or in once case even comatose) suddenly change and present me with potentially unsafe scenarios.
  11. by   WorldTraveler50
    That definately answers my question on the concerns I had. If a patient is on suicide precautions, does the nurse have to have the patient opened his or her mouth to see if the pills were swallowed so the patient doesn't hoard the pills?I know in the psych unit, they do for sure.
  12. by   verene
    Quote from WorldTraveler50
    That definately answers my question on the concerns I had. If a patient is on suicide precautions, does the nurse have to have the patient opened his or her mouth to see if the pills were swallowed so the patient doesn't hoard the pills?I know in the psych unit, they do for sure.
    I've only rarely seen it done at the hospital I work at; it seems to be at nurse discretion. We don't have a dedicated pysch unit at this hospital and my personal opinion is that our overall management of patients with mental illness-- crisis or no crisis-- is very inconsistent, in large part do to lack of any real training or guidance, but that is another issue altogether.

    However even if the nurse isn't checking the mouth immediately after administration, it isn't easy to hide something while constantly observed and patients have to remove the cheeked pill from the mouth at some point in time in order to horde. So this is usually an issue caught by a sitter, who reports to the nurse immediately that the patient is cheeking pills. Pretty hard to build up enough of a stash to cause harm.

    When I worked a mental health group home staff did check for cheeking in residents where it was a known problem, or if we suspected hoarding meds was an issue. There it typically wasn't an SI issue at all, but an issue of residents cheeking pills to then later sell on the street.
  13. by   SheriffLauren
    I've been at the infamous state facility for nearly 3 years now and I totally agree. It's almost always 99% of the time the people with personality disorders or addictions that assault staff and peers. I've only been truly afraid of a patient once-and she was part of the 99%. The 'classically' mentally ill patients rarely do so and usually only when provoked/feeling threatened.

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