Protection for nurses by state

  1. When I was in CNA school, my RN instructor told us there are certain states who have certain levels of protection for RNs. For example, Nevada has POOR protection for nurses. If a patient wants to file a lawsuit against an RN for some reason, chances are the RN could face some kind of penalty. California on the other hand, according to my instructor, has EXCELLENT protection for RNs. They protect their RNs within reason. If a patient files a lawsuit against an RN for some reason, chances are the RN will most likely win the suit. Is anyone knowledgeable about this? Are there certain states to stay away from? I've seen some articles like "top 5 states to work at as an RN". If this is true, I'd like to use this information for future use whenever I can get into nursing school and graduate. I think he might have said it in leu of how much hospitals budget can manage a good attorney level for their employees against the attorneys of the patients side. I know in Nevada, the BON motto is "to protect the public".
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    A nurse can be personally sued in any state. No protections exist to shield nurses from litigation in any state.

    Nonetheless, California is the only state with legally mandated nurse/patient ratios for acute care facilities. No other state has the protection of nurse/patient ratios.
  4. by   evastone
    Are you planning on doing something to get you sued? Because if you are, no state can help you regardless of protection laws. Follow your facility 's policy, do some good charting and hopefully you will have less to worry about.

    Most people choose where to work not based on who provides the best lawyer, rather, who pays well, treats staff with respect, have adequate staffing, good location, or even the first place that will offer them a job.

    Hope this helps.
  5. by   Rose_Queen
    Each state indeed has protections for nurses: they're called the Nurse Practice Acts (or whatever lingo the state chooses to use). Follow that NPA and facility policy, and the chance of a lawsuit against a nurse succeeding drop. When I was in nursing school, my state's NPA was required reading. If you ask me, every school should have this requirement. Know your NPA, know what is in and what is beyond your scope of practice, follow facility policy, and you should be just fine.
  6. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from evastone
    Are you planning on doing something to get you sued?
    Not an opportunist. I mean anybody trying to get into nursing school, stressing "will I get in? I hope I'll get in" and going through what students have to go through while in nursing school, why would I want to do something that would get me sued? Lol
  7. by   roser13
    Quote from TheAtomicStig_702
    Not an opportunist. I mean anybody trying to get into nursing school, stressing "will I get in? I hope I'll get in" and going through what students have to go through while in nursing school, why would I want to do something that would get me sued? Lol
    So why ask the question?

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