Proper Way to List Credentials? - page 5

by Q. 67,596 Views | 56 Comments

Ok I have a question. What is the proper way to list your credentials? I've seen Susy K, RN, BSN and Susy K, BSN, RN. Why do some people put the BSN first? Does it mean anything?... Read More


  1. 1
    Oy.

    I was going to read through everything to see if what I was going to say had been said already... then I realized how much I'd have to read. So if I'm repeating old information, kindly ignore.

    My understanding has always been that you list "most permanant first" out to "least permanant". That is, once you have an academic degree, it can't be taken from you. On the other hand, certifications are fragile and can lapse quite easily.

    So...

    Nancy Nurse, BSN, RN, CNS, CCRN

    -- CCRN is most likely to go first if not maintained by the correct number of CEUs.
    -- CNS is harder to lose, but still needs to be maintained steadily.
    -- RN would go next, but is harder to default, because it need BON authority to remove (not maintaining CEUs for licensure is a BON requirement).
    -- Even if Nancy purposely killed a patient and had her license revoked, NO ONE (other than the granting University) can take away her BSN. So even if she was no longer a Registered Nurse, she could still list herself as, Nancy Nurse, BSN (in the same way as Anakin Skywalker, PhD).

    Make sense?

    Again, if this is repeated information, kindly ignore and I'll go back to drinking.
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  2. 0
    Well congrats on the BM. I have a question as I am about to graduate with my MBA. Do I list my name as Jane Doe RN, BSN, MBA? Or does the BSN drop off?
    I am confused
  3. 1
    the proper way to list credentials according to my english professor from college is degree first. believe it or not i was told the reasoning behind this was because you can never lose your degree, but your license can be taken away. ex. jerod smith bsn, rn.
    nursekaren98 likes this.
  4. 1
    nurses here is information i have searched from wikipedia.com. please read below if you want to know the proper way to display your nursing credentials.

    list of nursing credentials

    from wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    jump to: navigation, search
    postnominal nursing credential usage


    a nurse's postnominal (listed after the name) credentials usually follow his or her name in this order:
    • highest earned academic degree in or related to nursing (e.g. "msn")
    • nursing licensure (e.g. "rn")
    • nursing certification (e.g. "ccrn")
    generally credentials are listed from most to least permanent. a degree, once earned, cannot be taken away. state licensure is only revoked for serious professional misconduct. certifications generally must be periodically renewed by examination or the completion of a prescribed number of continuing education units (ceus).
    nurses may also hold non-nursing credentials including academic degrees. these are usually omitted unless they are related to the nurse's job. for instance, a staff nurse would likely not list an mba, but a nurse manager might choose to do so.
    nursing credentials are separated from the person's name (and from each other) with commas. there are usually no periods within the credentials. (e.g. "bsn" not "b.s.n.")
    nursekaren98 likes this.
  5. 0
    In this economic downturn RN just is not enough
    On my resume I list RN MLIS
    I hope someone will read the resume to find out what my Masters is in....
  6. 0
    Quote from RN2B2005
    Stylistically, I think the "R.N., B.S.N." looks better. Also, it seems like degrees are usually listed in order of acquisition or importance (as in, So-and-So, M.D., M.P.H.--the M.P.H. was acquired to abet the M.D., so it comes afterwards). I can't find anything in the style manuals that refer to professional degrees specifically.

    The only thing that I think looks really stupid is people--like a nursing advisor of mine who has a serious case of "M.D. envy" and shall remain nameless--who put every degree they've ever earned after their name...e.g., Jane So-and-So, A.A.S., B.A., B.S.N., R.N., M.P.H., M.S.N., C.M.H.C., Ph.D. ("call me DOCTOR So-and-So"; I really, really wish I was kidding on this one, but I'm not. This is the same woman who spent a half-hour telling our advising class why we shouldn't go into nursing).
    Although this advisor sounds a bit thorny, it is entirely appropriate for someone with a PhD who works in an academic setting to be called Dr. An example would be someone who has PhD in chemistry and who teaches that subject in a university.
  7. 0
    Quote from landrover1
    Well congrats on the BM. I have a question as I am about to graduate with my MBA. Do I list my name as Jane Doe RN, BSN, MBA? Or does the BSN drop off?
    I am confused
    People in healthcare usually don't list any degrees that don't directly apply to their professional role in the healthcare setting (i.e., someone with a BA in something else entirely who then became an RN wouldn't list the BA after their name in healthcare settings). However, assuming you are getting the MBA to use within the healthcare context, you would drop the BSN because the MBA implies the previous degree (you would have had to have a baccalaureate degree to get into the graduate program) and, usually, only the highest degree is listed -- so I would go with (for what my opinion is worth! ) Jane Doe, MBA, RN.
  8. 0
    List of nursing credentials
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Postnominal Nursing Credential Usage
    A nurse's postnominal (listed after the name) credentials usually follow his or her name in this order:

    Highest earned academic degree in or related to nursing (e.g. "MSN")
    Nursing licensure (e.g. "RN")
    Nursing certification (e.g. "CCRN")

    Generally credentials are listed from most to least permanent. A degree, once earned, cannot be taken away. State licensure is only revoked for serious professional misconduct. Certifications generally must be periodically renewed by examination or the completion of a prescribed number of continuing education units (CEUs).

    Nurses may also hold non-nursing credentials including academic degrees. These are usually omitted unless they are related to the nurse's job. For instance, a staff nurse would likely not list an MBA, but a nurse manager might choose to do so.
    Nursing credentials are separated from the person's name (and from each other) with commas. There are usually no periods within the credentials. (e.g. "BSN" not "B.S.N.")

    List of nursing credentials - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  9. 1
    From The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), a subsidiary of
    the American Nurses Association (ANA) after a 0.21 second google search, the article everyone is looking for.

    How to List Your Credentials

    Even in our most professional hour, the author's source is... "Through informal
    research, I have found the general rule of thumb to be..."

    How can we perpetuate professionalism if this is how we conduct intra-professional information?
    frumpter likes this.
  10. 0
    I believe it is listing your degree first then your technical credential, i.e. Jane Doe, BSN RN



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