Proof There's No Nursing Shortage: Show RN's the MONEY - page 3

This is a case study in how the nursing shortage is really a myth. When you pay RN’s really well and give them great benefits … the shortage, for the most part, disappears. The real solution to the... Read More

  1. by   HM2VikingRN
    I work at a forensic hospital in MN. One of the nurses showed me an EMAIL and for the next 2 weeks they were looking for coverage for 81 shifts! There is a real shortage that cannot necessarily be ameliorated by better pay alone. There are real gaps of instructor availability for new nurses. (MN is short roughly 80 instructors).
  2. by   Sheri257
    Quote from HM2Viking
    I work at a forensic hospital in MN. One of the nurses showed me an EMAIL and for the next 2 weeks they were looking for coverage for 81 shifts! There is a real shortage that cannot necessarily be ameliorated by better pay alone.
    Actually ... in my neck of the woods ... better pay has made a BIG difference.

    While I was waiting to get hired by corrections, I also interviewed with the criminal psych facility in my area. They didn't get as much of a pay raise as the corrections RN's did, but it still was a hellava lot better than hospital pay.

    As I mentioned in my original post, 75 RN's were interviewing for eight positions at that facility. That means at least 9 RN's were competing for each job.

    So I think pay raises DO make a BIG difference in staffing levels.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 5, '07
  3. by   Freedom42
    The Institute for Women's Policy Research agrees with the OP. You might find this study on nurses' wages and the supposed shortage interesting.
  4. by   Snugglibumkins
    Interesting article. I am one of those non-working RNs that would consider working if the price was right - and I'm in my early 30s. However, to pay for full time child care for 3 kids only to make $20/hr isn't worth it to me. Yes, that is the wage at my current location. I will be moving in the next year and some of my kids will be school age and with higher wages (everywere but here), and less child care - I will return to the work force.

    I go to a toddler playgroup with 8 other non-working nurses. Now 8 non-working nurses sounds like nothing to you city folks, but here on the island with the shortage of nurses we, have 8 nurses is HUGE. We have 3 walk-in clinics and one hospital that is staffed with 1 ER nurse and 4 floor nurses daily. They are currently short 6 nursing positions in town. With 8 of us floating around, if any of those positions spoke up with enough money to justify my time, I'd consider it. I'm sure I can't be the only one thinking that way. And no, I didn't go into nursing for the money - however a decent wage should not be hard to get either.
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Snugglibumkins
    Interesting article. I am one of those non-working RNs that would consider working if the price was right - and I'm in my early 30s. However, to pay for full time child care for 3 kids only to make $20/hr isn't worth it to me. Yes, that is the wage at my current location. I will be moving in the next year and some of my kids will be school age and with higher wages (everywere but here), and less child care - I will return to the work force.
    That's a very good point. You have to wonder: if RN's were paid better so they could afford child care and then some, how many RN's would return to work for that reason alone?

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 6, '07
  6. by   RNsRWe
    About the original point of this thread.....I believe that if enough money gets thrown at the hospital nurses, you'd naturally find more nurses applying for those jobs, too. HOWEVER, I can also see not keeping them around for long, either, as I am absolutely certain that understaffing would be the norm, as it is now. Only instead of hearing "we don't have enough applicants" we'd hear "we can't afford to pay all of you what you demand". And we'd have less nurses working for more money, but the turnover would be insane. Hey, kinda like it is now...
    Last edit by sirI on May 6, '07 : Reason: referred to deleted post
  7. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from TrudyRN
    Not everyone who is locked up is guilty. You or someone you love could be wrongly accused, convicted, and locked up tomorrow. Then you would feel differently about who should or should not get good health care in prison. There but for the grace of God go you and I.

    As for mental health care being for the good of someone other than the mentally ill person - well, yes, but what about the poor suffering mentally ill individual? They did not ask to be born with a sick brain, they did not ask to be victims of personality changes due to head trauma that was induced in a MVA or assault that was in no way their fault. They have to suffer the side effects of psychotropics, which is no laughing matter. They must live a lifetime as 2nd class citizens because they are not able to fully function in the world, due to an illness that is no more their fault than is a, let's say, cleft palate or other birth defect. Have a heart, Hopefull2009. Does the hopeful part mean you are hoping to be an RN?
    :yeahthat:
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RNsRWe
    About the original point of this thread.....I believe that if enough money gets thrown at the hospital nurses, you'd naturally find more nurses applying for those jobs, too. HOWEVER, I can also see not keeping them around for long, either, as I am absolutely certain that understaffing would be the norm, as it is now. Only instead of hearing "we don't have enough applicants" we'd hear "we can't afford to pay all of you what you demand". And we'd have less nurses working for more money, but the turnover would be insane. Hey, kinda like it is now...
    Maybe the turnover wouldn't be as insane if people were making more money. Let's face it ... people are more inclined to quit if they're not making much money to begin with. But I agree that hospitals don't want to pay RN's more money and pretty much will do anything they can to avoid it.

    As far as staffing, California does have a ratio law and I think that has helped quite a bit. I also think wages have gone up because of the ratio law although, obviously not nearly as much as what corrections is paying.

    :typing
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Hopefull2009
    However, on the flip side, things shouldn't be better for people that are in prison than in the private sector, in regards to healthcare. Unless they are pregnant, I personally don't care if they get quality care or not...that's part of the price you pay for breaking the law.

    Just my .02
    There seems to be a lot of myths about corrections nursing ... in my experience, California inmates don't get better healthcare. They only get what they need, not what they want. The reason the federal judge took over the prison medical system was because many inmates were dying from conditions that should have been addressed but were neglected for months, even years. That's why the judge wanted the state to hire more RN's for their assessment skills.

    Just because an inmate has done something wrong like multiple DUI's or dealing/using drugs ... it doesn't mean he's not entitled to do his time and serve his sentence. An inmate shouldn't die in prison just because the staff neglected to send him to the hospital when, for example, he experienced a heart attack. Most inmates aren't on death row ... it's not supposed to be a death sentence due to neglect.

    And believe me ... the inmates who are faking with the hope that being sent out for medical treatment will be a picnic quickly learn that it's not. Being sent to the medical hub for treatment is actually dreaded by most inmates and most of them refuse to go once they learn where it is. Because at that facility the inmates are often shackled, the CO's are a lot tougher and they have little to no privileges there.

    Most people don't know this but, unless it's an emergency situation, inmates have to pay a $5 "co-pay" to be seen for a problem ... and that's a lot of money for most inmates. That alone tends to weed out a lot of fakers, false complaints and abuse of the system because most inmates don't want to pay that fee unless they're really sick.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 6, '07
  10. by   Cattitude
    Quote from Snugglibumkins
    Now 8 non-working nurses sounds like nothing to you city folks, but here on the island with the shortage of nurses we, have 8 nurses is HUGE..
    Eight non working nurses sounds like a lot to me! The reasons the others are not working are about $ as well?

    And I agree with the OP, I think better pay would solve a lot of the nursing "shortage".
    Last edit by Cattitude on May 6, '07
  11. by   Cherish
    Quote from TrudyRN
    Not everyone who is locked up is guilty. You or someone you love could be wrongly accused, convicted, and locked up tomorrow. Then you would feel differently about who should or should not get good health care in prison. There but for the grace of God go you and I.

    As for mental health care being for the good of someone other than the mentally ill person - well, yes, but what about the poor suffering mentally ill individual? They did not ask to be born with a sick brain, they did not ask to be victims of personality changes due to head trauma that was induced in a MVA or assault that was in no way their fault. They have to suffer the side effects of psychotropics, which is no laughing matter. They must live a lifetime as 2nd class citizens because they are not able to fully function in the world, due to an illness that is no more their fault than is a, let's say, cleft palate or other birth defect. Have a heart, Hopefull2009. Does the hopeful part mean you are hoping to be an RN?
    Very nicely said!
  12. by   CHATSDALE
    what i meant was that if all hospitals had the same pay scale then the % of nurse would be spread evenily throught out based on individual preference
    if the pay was higher some of the nurses not now active would return to the work force but probably not enough to get the staffing up to par and it would not solve the fact that we are going to have a lot of retiring nurses and a high increase aging citizens
    i think that nurses would return to the work force in large numbers if there was an emergency like a pandemic or natural disaster but they have earned their right to a happy retirement otherwise




    Quote from Sheri257
    And you know this how? For the last 20 years nursing wages, for the most part nationwide, have barely kept up with inflation ...

    We've never really had a situation where most nurses were paid really well so, I'm not sure how you could predict that we still would have staffing shortage in that scenario.

    :typing
  13. by   caliotter3
    The acute care hospital where I used to live conducted a downsizing. They started with departments other than nursing, then got to nursing. An acquaintance who was working in one of the ancillary departments told me about it. She described her "buyout" (very enticing), and told about the effect that the downsizing was having on staff in general, according to talk that was going around.

    This whole situation got me to thinking long and hard about nursing and how "secure" a line of work it really is. I got to experience this first hand when I got downsized myself.

    What really drove home the hypocrisy of the situation to me: a few months after my friend told me about the nurses being encouraged to leave, this very same hospital ran banner ads in the newspaper of the nearest large city for, you guessed it, various nursing positions. (In all the years previous, and since, I have never seen newspaper ads for this particular hospital.) Even I could figure out that all the hospital wanted to do was to replace experienced, well paid, nurses with seniority, with (perhaps; new grads??) inexperienced, bottom of the pay scale, nurses with "new hire" seniority.

    People who had no knowledge of what went on would be clueless until they came on board. People, like me, who knew something about it, get a bad taste in their mouth about that employer. After all, that was a place I was considering for a job. Who wants to work at a place where you can expect to be "encouraged" out as soon as your pay reaches a certain level? And being offered lower scale benefits is a morale downer before you even start.

    So nobody can convince me that there is such a widespread, honest, concern about a nursing "shortage". When a facility's management is concerned about their nursing staffing levels, they don't run off the nurses that are working for them.

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