PRN or Quit all together

  1. Hi all,

    I've been at my current critical care job for a little over 8 months. I like what I do and have learned a lot, however, there have been some very recent major family issues (my husband's new medical problems) that require my attention. My current job is night shift fulltime. In order to address the family issues, I need to be home more often and at night. It will most likely take a year to fully get my little family back on track.
    In the last week, I have applied to several M-F 8-6 pm nursing positions and will have 3 interviews next week. The positions are those of chronic disease RN educator, OB/Gyn clinic nurse, and Cardiology clinic staff nurse. I will most likely be offered one of these positions (on the positive side) and will now face a new dilemma. I will have to drastically cut back on my hours at the hospital to PRN or quit altogether. I would hate to quit before my year is up because I'd like to keep that bridge open. With that being said, is PRN with the hospital a good idea at least until I reach the year mark? Would it be wise to do this as opposed to quitting?

    Thanks for your input!
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   LonghornChic
    I did forget to mention that I graduated in May 2017, passed NCLEX June 2017, and started as a new grad in critical care in June 2017. Hence the reason why I'm hesitant to quit before the year is up.
    I have over 13 years varied experience as a medical assistant and medical office manager.
  4. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from LonghornChic
    Hi all,

    I've been at my current critical care job for a little over 8 months. I like what I do and have learned a lot, however, there have been some very recent major family issues (my husband's new medical problems) that require my attention. My current job is night shift fulltime. In order to address the family issues, I need to be home more often and at night. It will most likely take a year to fully get my little family back on track.
    In the last week, I have applied to several M-F 8-6 pm nursing positions and will have 3 interviews next week. The positions are those of chronic disease RN educator, OB/Gyn clinic nurse, and Cardiology clinic staff nurse. I will most likely be offered one of these positions (on the positive side) and will now face a new dilemma. I will have to drastically cut back on my hours at the hospital to PRN or quit altogether. I would hate to quit before my year is up because I'd like to keep that bridge open. With that being said, is PRN with the hospital a good idea at least until I reach the year mark? Would it be wise to do this as opposed to quitting?

    Thanks for your input!
    You're counting your chickens before they hatch. First, get an actual offer for a new job...and then go from there. You'll need to see if your employer is even interested in keeping you on PRN, too. I assume you've been on orientation for some of those eight months? Some places aren't interested in PRN employees with less than a few years of independent experience. And even employers who allow PRN employees with less experience may tell you to "take a hike" if they're not currently in need of PRN staff.
  5. by   caliotter3
    As Sour Lemon suggested, you should be hesitant to make assumptions. I would also consider a reduced part time schedule. One person only worked one shift a week at a facility where I once worked. That shift was the shift most likely for call-offs, so the employer was glad to have reliable coverage. I would try to avoid resigning outright.
  6. by   cleback
    If you need to be at home more often, the last thing you need is picking up prn hours on top of a full time job.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    You're counting your chickens before they hatch. First, get an actual offer for a new job...and then go from there. You'll need to see if your employer is even interested in keeping you on PRN, too. I assume you've been on orientation for some of those eight months? Some places aren't interested in PRN employees with less than a few years of independent experience. And even employers who allow PRN employees with less experience may tell you to "take a hike" if they're not currently in need of PRN staff.
    I agree with this. I am also wonder, if the husband has new medical issues, will he be able to keep HIS job and his insurance? Or will the OP be better served keeping her job and insurance. A new nurse, with only eight months of experience -- and a good chunk of that (at least half, I'm thinking) on orientation -- is not really an asset to a new employer. Not even an asset to the current employer yet without more experience.
  8. by   TriciaJ
    If I was in the OP's shoes, the first thing I would do is discuss my new situation with my nurse manager. Most people understand about family issues. If you've been a good employee so far she may not want to lose you. Give her a chance to come up with something creative that works for you both and doesn't involve burning a bridge. You never know until you ask.

    If she comes up with nothing, then you're no worse off and can resume brainstorming this on your own. Good luck.
  9. by   LonghornChic
    Quote from cleback
    If you need to be at home more often, the last thing you need is picking up prn hours on top of a full time job.
    It didn't cross my mind about PRN on top of any new schedule. I guess this will all depend on the amount of hours required PRN.
  10. by   LonghornChic
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    You're counting your chickens before they hatch. First, get an actual offer for a new job...and then go from there. You'll need to see if your employer is even interested in keeping you on PRN, too. I assume you've been on orientation for some of those eight months? Some places aren't interested in PRN employees with less than a few years of independent experience. And even employers who allow PRN employees with less experience may tell you to "take a hike" if they're not currently in need of PRN staff.
    Thank you for your reply. You are right about this. I was thinking more on the positive side and trying to take all scenarios into account (no job offers vs at least one job offer). I'm not going to quit my current job until I have secured a job that suits my needs. I had not thought about asking about the PRN requirements, something I should have done initially. I think I didn't do this out of fear that my employer will try to give me the boot sooner rather than later if they suspected that I was searching for something more stable. My manager is aware of my situation but I have not mentioned looking for another job.
    My orientation lasted 8 weeks (very short considering the specialty). I'm just hoping I can make this work out in one way or another.
  11. by   LonghornChic
    I am planning on discussing this with her soon. I was hesitant initially because I have been burned in the past by previous employers who have automtically made my life misarable as soon as I asked for less hours (I was working close to 60 hours a week).
  12. by   brownbook
    Quote from cleback
    If you need to be at home more often, the last thing you need is picking up prn hours on top of a full time job.
    Yes, if your new job is Monday to Friday 8 am to 6 pm you won't have much extra home time?

    If you can afford it a benefited part time position where you currently work makes more sense.
  13. by   LonghornChic
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I agree with this. I am also wonder, if the husband has new medical issues, will he be able to keep HIS job and his insurance? Or will the OP be better served keeping her job and insurance. A new nurse, with only eight months of experience -- and a good chunk of that (at least half, I'm thinking) on orientation -- is not really an asset to a new employer. Not even an asset to the current employer yet without more experience.
    We are furtunate enough that his employer has allowed us to use medical leave of absence. This should cover us for a bit until he can return to work (he'll be abl to, he just needs some extended recovery time). We also have some emergency savings to get us through. The main concern is my children needing care at night and after school. My husband was responsible for that part but will mostly be unable to do it for the next several months due to his inpatient status.
    I have very little experience as an RN but the employers I spoke with seem optomistic and willing to train. I made sure to explain how green I actually was (in terms of nursing experience) before I even set up an interview with them.
  14. by   LonghornChic
    Quote from brownbook
    Yes, if your new job is Monday to Friday 8 am to 6 pm you won't have much extra home time?

    If you can afford it a benefited part time position where you currently work makes more sense.
    I think this will be something I will bring up to my manager when I talk with her next week. If their part time hours are doable then I might stick it our with them. I know of a couple of nurses that work 7 am - 3 pm a couple of times a week. Most of those nurses have been here for years though so they probably earned those hours. Doesn't hurt to ask I guess.

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