Pregnant and can't lift? - page 2

I'm wondering when you really are not supposed to lift when pregnant? I'm sure I was quite careful with my first, but the reality of hauling a toddler around while pregnant with the second made me... Read More

  1. by   Schmoo1022
    I worked right up to the day before I delivered. I helped with boosting whenever needed. It was more ackward for me than anything. On the other hand, I wouldn't do anything that I felt uncomfortable with. I work in long term care, so the aids did all the lifting. My Dr.s reminded frequently everytime I would complain about this and that, Pregnancy is not a disease or illness!
  2. by   BSNtobe2009
    My father had something similar happen at the hospital once, the woman was about 8 weeks pregnant, healthy, etc. She refused to help him lift a patient for a procedure (so he had to call another one), and he told nursing supervisor that he didn't want her around when he was doing rounds if she couldn't work. (he wouldn't have done that if she was anywhere near full term)

    They sent the nurse home and told her she couldn't return back to work without a doctor's note since "her pregnancy required undocumented work restrictions". She returned the very next day...with a clear bill of health and no lifting restriction.

    That was the last they heard of her not lifting until she was closer to her due date.

    I understand that some women have difficult pregnancies, but I think that is dangerous for a floor nurse if they start acting all delicate a day after they find out.
  3. by   txspadequeenRN
    My doctor put me on a 8 hr a day work day limit and a 25 pound weight lifting restriction as soon as I told him I was a nurse. He simply ask me what I did for a living and started writing orders. I am however high risk and I do think he is a bit overboard at times.
  4. by   DDRN4me
    i worked right up till 5 hrs before delivery (not something i would do today) I agree t hat no one should jeopardize their health or baby's health; but documentation from the hcp is something they should have if they needit !
  5. by   TazziRN
    Quote from Sandi0302
    Lifting a pt is different than lifting a box. No one, pregnant or not, should be lifting a person on their own. That is the way people get injured.
    As far as lifting while pregnant, the first trimester is the most critical, and the tri where the risk for miscarriage is highest. I have said this in another post, and I will say it again: An unborn child isn't worth risking for anybody or any job...period.
    Nowhere has anyone said that she should be lifting on her own, but she is refusing to even help. And yes, the first trimester is the most critical for fetal development as well as the high risk of miscarriage, but I seriously doubt lifting has ever been responsible for a miscarriage. If she want to be excused from lifting during her entire pregnancy, then she needs to get documentation from her OB.
  6. by   Medic2RN
    Pregnancy is not a disease or illness!
    Funny, but when I went out on "maternity leave", I had to fill out all the paperwork for disability and speak with the risk management department for my injury in order to be on light duty. Go figure.

    I would never dream of risking my future child for any reason. I followed the advice of my doctor when I found out I was pregnant. I was allowed to lift until the 17th week with the first one and the 20th week with the second. Then I was put on lifting restrictions and that was working as a firefighter/paramedic.

    I agree with Tazzi, she should get a note then so there is no misunderstanding or animosity among her coworkers.
  7. by   emmycRN
    I worked all the way through my second pregnancy. I told my Doc I was a nurse and asked specifically about liftiing. He told me that since I had been doing this work for years, being pregnant was no reason to stop. My co-workers had a harder time with my lifting than I did. They never would ask me to help them unless desperate and would go out of their way to find another person to help lift my patients even though I was standing there saying, "I can do this!!!". It was nice feeling cared for. I think this issue has more to do with courtesy than the actual issue of wether or not she should lift. It's time we started looking out for each other.
  8. by   PamperedRN
    I am currently on maternity leave. When I was pregnant my doc let me lift but told me to always ask for help. She did put me on lifting restrictions for a month when I started bleeding at around 13 weeks. I think she did this mainly for my peace of mind. This restriction pulled me off work. Our hospital states a nurse must be able to lift with assistance at least 125lbs After I stopped bleeding she allowed me to return to work. She did place me on pt restrictions at my first visit though. I couldn't take care of any isolation pt except c-diff pts. Her statement was if I can't treat you while you are pregnant for the disease then you don't need to be taking care of a pt that has it specifically MRSA VRE. And at the end I was put on 8 hour shifts. I was a high risk pt also. Most of the time my doc said do what doesn't hurt. My unit was great also. They always lended a hand to help boost and lift, wouldn't give me the 500lb pt, also I was on the code team they stopped giving me the beeper after about 5 months. SOmehting about being my belly being in the way of doing effective compressions. As long as people are willing to help then I see no reason why she shouldn't be able to lift.
  9. by   Jolie
    Quote from emmycRN
    I think this issue has more to do with courtesy than the actual issue of wether or not she should lift. It's time we started looking out for each other.

    Courtesy and looking out for each other go both ways. If a pregnant nurse is taking advantage of her condition to avoid lifting (without medical cause), then she is taking advantage of her co-workers.

    I have been fortunate to work on units where pregnant nurses were most definitely "cared for" by their co-workers. But that's not likely to happen when co-workers feel put-upon by a nurse who uses pregnancy as an excuse to (unnecessarily) pass off difficult or unpleasant tasks.
  10. by   mamason
    Quote from Jolie
    Courtesy and looking out for each other go both ways. If a pregnant nurse is taking advantage of her condition to avoid lifting (without medical cause), then she is taking advantage of her co-workers.

    I have been fortunate to work on units where pregnant nurses were most definitely "cared for" by their co-workers. But that's not likely to happen when co-workers feel put-upon by a nurse who uses pregnancy as an excuse to (unnecessarily) pass off difficult or unpleasant tasks.
    Yes.....I agree 100%
  11. by   KyPinkRN
    Quote from emmycRN
    I worked all the way through my second pregnancy. I told my Doc I was a nurse and asked specifically about liftiing. He told me that since I had been doing this work for years, being pregnant was no reason to stop. My co-workers had a harder time with my lifting than I did. They never would ask me to help them unless desperate and would go out of their way to find another person to help lift my patients even though I was standing there saying, "I can do this!!!". It was nice feeling cared for. I think this issue has more to do with courtesy than the actual issue of wether or not she should lift. It's time we started looking out for each other.
    My doctor said the exact same thing to me when I was preggers... at the time I was working full-time 12 hour days on a private ambulance service (meaning lifting 12 pts per day in and out of the ambulance.) He said that my body was used to it and it wouldn't be a problem... I think it actually helped me when it came to labor because I was in great shape. I worked until a week before I delivered... no problems.
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Our docs tell them no more than 15 pounds. THis is standard for all normal and healthy pregnancies.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Whenever I have been on lift restrictions (surgery or pregnancy), I sure as heck did my best to find ways to take the strain off my coworkers in other ways (such as med passes, Iv starts, restocking/cleaning, discharge teaching, bed linen changes, new admissions, patient assessments, etc) ...anything that worked within my restrictions, I did cause fair is fair.

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