Preceptorship Expectations???

  1. I am about to begin my last semester in an ADN program

    Anyway...I have to do 150 hours preceptorship in ICU. I am very excite and terrified at the same time. I have only had 10 clinical days in ICU! I observed alot and feel I learned alot --but I know there is soooo much I dont know.

    What I want to know is...what clinical skills do you (Preceptors) expect students to be able to perform with minimal assistance?

    Short of making huge mistakes (like killing a patient, administering wrong meds, etc) would you flunk a student for?
    •  
  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    Have you talked with the education person for that department?? Or the manager?

    I'm starting my preceptorship in the ER next semester, and I had a meeting with the ER educator a few weeks ago. She gave me a big package of information she expects me to know when I arrive, and the orientation package for all new hires. She said it would be a really good idea for me to follow along, and get an idea of what stuff I know, and what stuff I don't know. I'm thinking this will probably be very useful, b/c I have already started to research the stuff I don't know yet.

    Maybe see if you can email the educator/manager, and ask them what their expectations for preceptor students are.....especially since you have such a short time there. Thats what I did, and it proved to be very helpful
  4. by   zambezi
    When I precept a student, I honenstly don't expect much as far as skills go, only because most people haven't had much clinical time. I would expect you to know the basics of assessment, starting IVs, foleys, ngts, bps, etc. What normal values for labs are (or at least where to look them up), general procedures and plans of care for the types of patients in your unit. If there is a skill that you haven't done before, I would expect you to know the general plan...maybe watch me do it once and then try on your own (after telling me your plan). I expect you to be a willing participant, use good common sense, ask a ton of questions when you don't know something. I would also expect a general understanding of meds that you use frequently and to look up meds you don't know. I would encourage you to practice time management skills from day 1. Alot depends on the student...I find out how to learn and go from there.
  5. by   Ohmygosh
    Quote from S.T.A.C.E.Y
    Have you talked with the education person for that department?? Or the manager?

    I'm starting my preceptorship in the ER next semester, and I had a meeting with the ER educator a few weeks ago. She gave me a big package of information she expects me to know when I arrive, and the orientation package for all new hires. She said it would be a really good idea for me to follow along, and get an idea of what stuff I know, and what stuff I don't know. I'm thinking this will probably be very useful, b/c I have already started to research the stuff I don't know yet.

    Maybe see if you can email the educator/manager, and ask them what their expectations for preceptor students are.....especially since you have such a short time there. Thats what I did, and it proved to be very helpful

    My school kind of does things weird....I dont have a clue who or where my preceptor nurse or facility is yet.
  6. by   Ohmygosh
    Quote from zambezi
    When I precept a student, I honenstly don't expect much as far as skills go, only because most people haven't had much clinical time. I would expect you to know the basics of assessment, starting IVs, foleys, ngts, bps, etc. What normal values for labs are (or at least where to look them up), general procedures and plans of care for the types of patients in your unit. If there is a skill that you haven't done before, I would expect you to know the general plan...maybe watch me do it once and then try on your own (after telling me your plan). I expect you to be a willing participant, use good common sense, ask a ton of questions when you don't know something. I would also expect a general understanding of meds that you use frequently and to look up meds you don't know. I would encourage you to practice time management skills from day 1. Alot depends on the student...I find out how to learn and go from there.
    Nice to know you dont expect much..lol...of the skills you mentioned I have the least experience with starting IV's--and its a skill I wish I had, had more of an opportunity to attempt. Most of the patients I helped to care for during my ICU clinicals already had either a PICC or other type of line in place.

close