Preceptor advice

  1. 0
    Iíve been a nurse for exactly one year. Iím not the fastest and in fact I often come in a bit early, seldom eat lunch, and usually leave a bit late to get all my work done. The other day I was told I would be precepting a new nurse who just graduated. Iím excited b/c this is something I have looked forward to doing, although not this soon. I think I could do a better job than many nurses Iíve seen, and have enjoyed the few times that I was paired with a student or orientee thus far.

    At the same time I want to say ďno wayĒ. First of all I wasnít asked (that would have been nice). Iíve not been trained for this. Iím one of the slower nurses we have and have a difficult time getting my own work done. I only have a yr experience and donít feel like the training I had has prepared me well for the position.

    Iíve already been labeled on the unit as someone who is a bit resistant to step up to the plate (because I refused to be in charge during the first 6mos). While I donít believe it is really appropriate to have me precept someone I believe I could be good at it, I hopefully can help out a new grad, and it just might turn out to be a growth experience me. I love nursing and I really want to provide a good experience for this new grad.

    With this in mind Iím looking for any recommendations. Thanks!
    :flowersfo
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 4
    If I were you I would ask for a preceptor program to be put in place. That way you would have some sort of guideline to go by. I do feel however that with only a year experience and your difficulty with time management, you may not be ready yet to precept.
    shellsgogreen, Babs0512, medsurgrnco, and 1 other like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from turtle in scrubs
    iíve been a nurse for exactly one year. iím not the fastest and in fact i often come in a bit early, seldom eat lunch, and usually leave a bit late to get all my work done. the other day i was told i would be precepting a new nurse who just graduated. iím excited b/c this is something i have looked forward to doing, although not this soon. i think i could do a better job than many nurses iíve seen, and have enjoyed the few times that i was paired with a student or orientee thus far.

    at the same time i want to say ďno wayĒ. first of all i wasnít asked (that would have been nice). iíve not been trained for this. iím one of the slower nurses we have and have a difficult time getting my own work done. i only have a yr experience and donít feel like the training i had has prepared me well for the position.

    iíve already been labeled on the unit as someone who is a bit resistant to step up to the plate (because i refused to be in charge during the first 6mos). while i donít believe it is really appropriate to have me precept someone i believe i could be good at it, i hopefully can help out a new grad, and it just might turn out to be a growth experience me. i love nursing and i really want to provide a good experience for this new grad.

    with this in mind iím looking for any recommendations. thanks!
    :flowersfo

    i am the preceptor at our organization for all new staff and staff that need more help on time management etc.

    does your place of employment have a preceptor program in place as a guide for you?

    if you do not feel you can get your work done in a timely manner just remember that this will slow you down even more because everything you do has to be explained to the preceptee.

    i love it but it does make you be more effecient in your time management and prioritization.

    not sure what to advise you apart from you sitting down and deciding if you can be of benefit to a new grad, what can you impart on them, do you have good time management skills as this one is a biggie for all new staff to learn, what do you have that can offer them?????

    we can all be resistant to change etc but maybe they see more potential in you at your work place than you see in yourself?

    what ever you decide i wish you growth, vision and success in what ever you choose.
    Turtle in scrubs likes this.
  6. 0
    I know that my unit does not have any preceptor program in place, but I think I will see if the hospital offers anything along these lines.

    Iím slow, but pretty well organized and feel I prioritize well. I feel that I have a lot to offer, but obviously a bit concerned about my weaknesses. I have a ton of ideas of how I want to proceed and what I want to avoid Ė that have stemmed from my own experience and what Iíve read in many of the posts on this site. If I see that things are not going well, or feel that Iím not providing a beneficial experience for this new grad, then I will stand aside.

    Thanks for the feedback. It is easy to get influenced by the culture on the unit (which seems to take things so lightly), and nice to get a bit of a reality check from others.
  7. 1
    You might consider discussing your concerns regarding precepting someone with your manager, while asking for assistance in preparing to be a preceptor in the future. I think you have very valid concerns, and my guess is they have more experienced nurses who could precept instead.
    Turtle in scrubs likes this.
  8. 1
    I agree with discussing your reticence about precepting with your manager. I personally feel that a year is not long enough to have been a nurse to be considered for precepting a new orient. While I'm sure you are a competent nurse, I feel someone with a bit more experience is necessary in order to provide a good orientation for new staff.

    With that said, I think a preceptor class might be just what the doctor ordered. If your hospital doesn't have one, perhaps you could speak with education and "step up" and help organize one - as least volunteer for a committee to represent your floor in any specific needs a preceptor would have to know.

    Follow your instincts. Sometimes management makes good decisions and picks appropriate persons for these tasks, and sometimes, I hate to say it, they just pick a warm body. Don't be that warm body, at least not until you feel your ready.

    Good luck, God Bless
    Turtle in scrubs likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Babs0512
    I agree with discussing your reticence about precepting with your manager. I personally feel that a year is not long enough to have been a nurse to be considered for precepting a new orient. While I'm sure you are a competent nurse, I feel someone with a bit more experience is necessary in order to provide a good orientation for new staff.

    With that said, I think a preceptor class might be just what the doctor ordered. If your hospital doesn't have one, perhaps you could speak with education and "step up" and help organize one - as least volunteer for a committee to represent your floor in any specific needs a preceptor would have to know.

    Follow your instincts. Sometimes management makes good decisions and picks appropriate persons for these tasks, and sometimes, I hate to say it, they just pick a warm body. Don't be that warm body, at least not until you feel your ready.

    Good luck, God Bless
    I cannot tell you how much I hate the "warm body" view of nurses. It is so degrading to us, and is a reason that we are not seen as a true profession. I wish that we could be seen as individual professionals with varied talents and knowledge. You can't just plug any nurse any old place and think that it doesn't matter. Oh well.
  10. 0
    Quote from Babs0512
    I agree with discussing your reticence about precepting with your manager. ........I feel someone with a bit more experience is necessary in order to provide a good orientation for new staff.

    With that said, I think a preceptor class might be just what the doctor ordered...............

    Our staff on the unit is very "young" (experience wise), so it is sort of slim picken's. I spoke to the nurse educator (who is pretty much running the show), and she assures me I was chosen for more then just my warm body. Not sure how true it is but ok. There are classes that I will be going to w/ my orientee, but they won't be till much later. Her orientation started and it seems to be going ok so far - we shall see.
  11. 1
    i agree with the others who suggested a preceptor program - we have one, and i've heard it's pretty good. my manager mentioned to me that she has me in mind for a preceptor down the line (not yet, still too new:uhoh21 but if and when i do, i will sure as heck need a guideline.

    best of luck to you!
    Turtle in scrubs likes this.
  12. 1
    Turtle: Good to hear that, I'm taking that to mean she see's good things in you, and you must have knowledge and expertise to impart to a new orient. Well done!
    Turtle in scrubs likes this.


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