Posters that are not nurses - page 5

i'm going to keep this nice and polite i promise mods!:) i'm just hoping that one of the smart student/new nurse posters can answer this. i know that we have quite a few people on here that... Read More

  1. by   Tweety
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    It's a free country with freedom of speech and Thank God for that! I don't have a problem with anyone posting no matter their profession I just find it odd that non-nurses and non-nursing students join. I am a nurse and thats why I'm here and not on a real estate forum.
    Check our Terms of Service. We are a moderated forum. Not a free for all where people can post anything and everything.
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from CASbeezgirlRN
    Even when communication is disagreeable, it can be positive if said in the right way. I know it's hard on a message board beacuse you can't hear tones and voice inflections but it's sometimes very obvious when someone is being nasty.


    I think you have a point. It's all a matter of how you present your disagreement.

    Say someone doesn't like nurses in the nurses station to talk about "drug seekers". A non-nurse who chimes in "well I guess you've never been in pain, how dare you judge, I hope you're never and pain and if I'm in the hospital I hope you're not my nurse!" is definately going to get an answer like "You're not a nurse, until you work with these kinds of patients, please shut up". And it deteriorates from there.

    Like other people, I appreciate input from others. I can only imagine how my mouth and even some of my practices might be questionable in the newbies eyes. Instead of me saying "well there's what they teach you in school and there's the real world", perhaps I need to take a moment to pause and consider what's been said.............I am more likely to do so if said criticism is given in a professional tone. I can take criticism well. Older nurses need to not brush off newbies just because they are new, and newbies perhaps can learn a lesson or two about presenting their fresh perspective so we all can learn.
  3. by   Cattitude
    Quote from Tweety
    Like other people, I appreciate input from others. I can only imagine how my mouth and even some of my practices might be questionable in the newbies eyes. Instead of me saying "well there's what they teach you in school and there's the real world", perhaps I need to take a moment to pause and consider what's been said.............I am more likely to do so if said criticism is given in a professional tone. I can take criticism well. Older nurses need to not brush off newbies just because they are new, and newbies perhaps can learn a lesson or two about presenting their fresh perspective so we all can learn.
    Good points again. This is a good thing when in a situation where advice might be appreciated. I agree that something can be learned from a newbie.
    On the other hand, when it's time to vent, it's time to vent!:roll
    I think that when nurses are letting off steam is NOT the time for non nurses to chime in with their advice/views when they haven't walked in our shoes. I mean really, where else can we feel safe to discuss nursing issues that just irk the you know what out of us? Just let us be, you may one day find yourself saying the exact same words. We're still great nurses!
    As far as some other stuff posted, yes real life nursing is very different from textbook nursing. I have sometimes scared myself. But it is reality and taking care of the pt's is first and foremost no matter what the textbook says. There are some situations that come up you will never find in any book. Ok, I'm bringing back strange memories now
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I think that when nurses are letting off steam is NOT the time for non nurses to chime in with their advice/views when they haven't walked in our shoes.
    This made me think of a few ER posts that i had replied on as a student, and the good ol' standard (yet very tired) reply of "wait till yer a nurse", "work in the ER and THEN tell me that," etc.

    Ok, well i'm a nurse, been on for a little over two years. Still don't feel any difference on the same subjects than i did as a student. Worked in the ER for a little while PRN. Still don't feel any difference of opinion for the things i replied about as a student (i quit the ER because of the co-workers, not the job itself).

    Thing of it is though, i feel that someone should be able to give their perception on a situation without having "wait till you're a nurse" slapped back at them as a reply. Their experience once they become a nurse just might not change their feelings on something.
  5. by   Tweety
    I agree. Sometimes we need to vent, and that's it. No further input is needed, we just need to get it out and move on. People should let us know they hear and understand. Take the vent for what it is and don't over analyze what horrible nurses we must be.
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    This made me think of a few ER posts that i had replied on as a student, and the good ol' standard (yet very tired) reply of "wait till yer a nurse", "work in the ER and THEN tell me that," etc.

    Ok, well i'm a nurse, been on for a little over two years. Still don't feel any difference on the same subjects than i did as a student. Worked in the ER for a little while PRN. Still don't feel any difference of opinion for the things i replied about as a student (i quit the ER because of the co-workers, not the job itself).

    Thing of it is though, i feel that someone should be able to give their perception on a situation without having "wait till you're a nurse" slapped back at them as a reply. Their experience once they become a nurse just might not change their feelings on something.
    Good point. The "wait until you're a nurse" reply is not a good response and is very condescending.

    Sometimes people giving their perceptions when we're venting is not really necessary. We're just venting, if one can't relate, just move on. Or the way they respond is not appropriate.
  7. by   PANurseRN1
    I'm sorry, but I think it is simply not valid for someone who has no experience in an area to tell the experienced person "You should have done this/you should have done that..."

    I don't work in an OR; I work in same day surgery. I would never dream of opining on what is/is not appropriate OR procedure/practice. Same thing with OB. The only things I know about OB are the bare necessities you need to work in the ED, where I also work.

    Whatever.
  8. by   oktravelnurse
    Geez, this nursing instructor must have a problem. Good for you for not participating in this type of useless disscussion. I would think the students would benefit more from an open discussion about what would be best in this type of clinical setting. It's just wrong to have students tattle on floor nurses. This also is a bad example of working as a team.
  9. by   58flyer
    Quote from RNKittyKat
    What's wrong with a different perspective? If the only people nurses listen to are other nurses, we'd be finding ourselves thinking in an ever decreasing sized box. Bring it on I say. Maybe I can learn something from outside my box. And maybe I can share what I've learned with the non-nurse. Keep communication open. When we stop talking, listening and sharing, we're done for. Might as well close all the schools. I've seen the teacher learn from the student.
    :yeahthat: I am one of those posters who is not a nurse (yet). When I first signed on to this forum, I did so thinking that I would probably never actually post. I wanted to learn and maybe ask a question or two.

    I am not totally ignorant of what goes on in a healthcare setting. I spent a year working as an orderly in a hospital while doing my pre-reqs to get into nursing school. I got into nursing school, then dropped out after encountering an unusually high level of hostility. During my law enforcement career, I worked as an evidence tech, and took some CE courses along with forensic nurses in the area of sex crimes investigation. Spent 6 years in that field alone with a lot of professional interaction with medical personnel. I also spent a lot of years in secondary employment providing police security in the emergency room at a level 1 trauma center.

    That said, I have tried not to post on any subject matter unless I felt there was something positive I could contribute to the discussion. I have gotten my share of questions as to why I am even here. I usually don't try to post any responses to those venting posts. Hope I haven't offended anyone, if I have, here's a peace offering ...
  10. by   adrienurse
    Quote from SethJ
    I think we should acknowledge that students and new nurses and vets can all offer something valuable. As a student, I'm being taught the most up-to-date research based information. But a vet nurse has been on the job and can offer his/her experience. Personally, I hope to learn from my profs but also learn from the valuable vet nurses.
    Seth I'm not disagreeing with you. expanding on your point.

    It goes both ways. It's your job as a student to learn what your courses are teaching you. On the other hand you're sent to your clinicals to learn by observing. Any nurse can tell you why a certain thing's procedure is done a little differently, and there may be a valid reason for this. This is extending the learning process for you. A student that spends their time complaining about the difference without enquiring as to why is not learning from being on the unit. You're there to observe, not to spy.


    Non-nurses need to acknowledge that nurses do not stop learning once they start their positions as nurses. They will learn different approaches and adapt what they are going so that it benefits the patient more. They also have their eyes on the best practice literature because they are required to keep up on their information. What it done in practice is often done because it is adapted to the patient at hand and their needs.
    Last edit by adrienurse on Jan 29, '07
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Tweety
    Good point. The "wait until you're a nurse" reply is not a good response and is very condescending.
    Not necessarily. As a new grad who's posted as a student on this board for a long time now, I have to admit that a lot of times they were right. Maybe we should wait until we're nurses.

    When I was a student just starting out with just one patient, I didn't have a clue. By the time I started getting a full load of patients both working as an extern and, also, during preceptorship, I realized how right they were and how tough it is.

    And I'm spoiled because I live in California where we have only five patients. I don't know how you guys in other states manage with 8-10 patients.

    Yet ... I see students lecturing RN's about how they need to take breaks and manage their time better. I personally found those comments absurd.

    And I've seen really disrespectful comments from students like "what did you expect, flowers?"

    I think some students ... myself included ... were dead wrong a lot of the time. I hope I wasn't as rude as some of these other posters but, I also realize that I definitely didn't know what I was talking about. I should have just kept my mouth shut.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 29, '07
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from lizz
    Not necessarily. As a new grad who's posted as a student on this board for a long time now, I have to admit that a lot of times they were right. Maybe we should wait until we're nurses.

    When I was a student just starting out with just one patient, I didn't have a clue. By the time I started getting a full load of patients both working as an extern and, also, during preceptorship, I realized how right they were and how tough it is.

    And I'm spoiled because I live in California where we have only five patients. I don't know how you guys in other states manage with 8-10 patients.

    Yet ... I see students lecturing RN's about how they need to take breaks and manage their time better. I personally found those comments absurd.

    And I've seen really disrespectful comments from students like "what did you expect, flowers?"

    I think some students ... myself included ... were dead wrong a lot of the time. I hope I wasn't as rude as some of these other posters but, I also realize that I definitely didn't know what I was talking about. I should have just kept my mouth shut.

    :typing


    I guess it depends upon the context it's use. Until someone has walked a mile in my shoes perhaps it's not appropriate to tell me what to do.

    In other respects a curt "wait until your a nurse" can be a brush off.

    It's kind of like a parent who says "because I said so" or "as long as you're under my roof, you follow my rules"....end of discussion. One should offer at least some validation and justification for what you say, rather than brush someone off.

    I think some students ... myself included ... were dead wrong a lot of the time. I hope I wasn't as rude as some of these other posters but, I also realize that I definitely didn't know what I was talking about. I should have just kept my mouth shut.

    This is precisely what we are talking about. Becoming a real nurse in the real world changes your perspective a bit. Not in every aspect as Marie stated above. I hope those who are not nurses, yet telling us how to do our jobs read your post. LOL Thanks for the honesty.
    Last edit by Tweety on Jan 29, '07
  13. by   rita359
    Quote from lizz
    I'm a new grad who's about to take the NCLEX. But I have noticed some pretty disrespectful posts from my fellow students. I don't know much but, at least I worked enough during school to get an idea of how tough the job is.

    Sometimes I think it's also because the teachers actually encourage this. One of them wanted us to report "wrong" things that floor nurses did during clinicals ... which, I thought was absolutely ridiculous. The instructor was going to report these supposed violations to the charge nurse. It was unbelievable.

    Needless to say, I never participated in that ridiculous exercise.

    :typing

    When such instructor walks in my shoes for a shift and can do everything by the book then I think she may have room to criticize. For instance, capping needles. I've been through capping needles, breaking needles off with the caps, cutting them off with a device for that purpose etc. It has been the hardest thing for me to get used to not capping needles. I "know" I am not supposed to do it but a 35 year habit is hard to break(think smoking). Washing hands every 2 minutes is right up there with capping needles.

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