Plunger?

  1. 0
    Interesting title, I know. I was going about my normal day at work and giving an IM injection on the arm. I prepared it as I do a million times, aspirated and when I went to push the plunger would NOT budge. I tried to push hard enough that if the plunger gave I wouldn't hurt the pt too bad but I ended up having to redo (with a new syringe and medication) on the other arm without any problems at all, as usual. Was this a fluke or something? Has this ever happened to anyone? I felt horrible and apologized, I literally was dumbfounded!
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I've had syringes not want to get going before, I think it's a suction thing. Not sure this is really what you are talking about, but I think if you push some of the med out the needle tip during your bubble check (just a drop, then flick so no residue is on the outside of the needle) before you dart the patient, you might avoid that little problem.
  5. 0
    Did you hit bone? I've seen this happen in that situation before.
  6. 0
    I didn't hit bone I know that for sure (I always do the grab technique and make sure I've got the muscle) and I do put out a little drop, but I never thought about flicking it off (usually it falls off anyway), maybe it was that? It was a thick medication too, it never usually gives me problems. Is there anything you've done once you've realized it's not going to move that fixes the problem?

    Another question, now I'm doubting myself.. Had I hit bone would I have gotten the bubble from aspiration still?
    Last edit by Belle1005 on Feb 18, '13
  7. 1
    You will KNOW when you hit bone, it makes me shudder. It could just be as simple as a defective needle..I've had my fair share
    hiddencatRN likes this.
  8. 1
    I thought we were going to be talking about toilets.

    I think that happened to me once years ago, something may have been defective.

    If you hit a bone, you would know it.
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  9. 0
    OP - I hope you saved the syringe & followed your employer's process for reporting defective/malfunctioning equipment. This could be just a fluke, but it could also be the result of a more serious manufacturing problem that needs to be addressed.
  10. 0
    I've only hit bone once and I cringed. Luckily I don't think the patient noticed.

    ~ No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent -Eleanor Roosevelt ~


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