Please warn me if I'm crazy!!!!

  1. 0
    Hello,

    I'm the 36yo mother of two, formerly a working Mom, but home for the last four years.

    In the last several months, I have been researching and seriously considering a nursing career. Right now, the only path for me is an AS Nursing, and hopefully, when my 3yo is in school, go on to BSN. Could I please dump my pros and cons, as I see them, onto the board and get your input??? No one could give me the honest advice I need but experienced nurses.

    The cons, as I see them:
    1) I'm pretty darn old for a nursing student/new RN, aren't I?
    2) I don't care for needles much.
    3) I may be a single Mom soon.
    4) Is there really the stability/plethora of job openings that i hear about?

    The pros, as i see them:

    1) Everyone says there will always be nursing jobs.
    2) Low pay for the stress/work, but pretty good pay for the everyday world.
    3) benefits I have no other hope of getting.
    4) I really do like helping people.
    5) Hospitals and medicine fascinate me, and always have.
    As far as whether I'm suited to it, I have a very high stress tolerance (trust me!), a great sense of humor, am in good shape (do have a weak back, though), have a lot of leadership experience, and am a two-time cancer survivor, so I know a little bit about being on the patient's side, and what a great nurse can do to help you through fear/pain/confusion.

    So, ladies (and gentlemen, excuse me!), please give me your thoughts with both barrels. Am I crazy to consider this, only mildly disturbed, or should i go for it???

    Thanks for any help!
    Dawn
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  4. 17 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Hi Dawn
    yes, go for it! I think you have carefully thought outhte options and are not expecting roses where thorns may be. As a cancer survivor, you will have a lot of insight into how some patinets are feeling. You can easily get over the needles thing- you are sticking them into others, not yourself (not that you shouldn't be careful. I can also see that this is something you have decided you want to do. I personally think that you will do quite well. Keep us posted on your progress.
  6. 0
    WELCOME!

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  7. 0
    Go for it. I went back to school part time when my last child started first grade. I worked almost full time and went to school part time to get my prereqs out of the way.When I was 38 I started nursing school full time. On the way to school that first day I almost turned around and quit I was so scared. Now several years down the road I am so proud of my accomplishments. My family survived school and my late nights studying. When I go to work now I look around me and can't explain how happy I am that I did the one thing I always wanted to do...Becom an RN. With all the problems we face every day I wouldn't change a thing. Good luck.
  8. 0
    Should you start nursing school at your age?? YES!! You will see that you are in the majority not the minority when you get into your program. I also firmly believe every RN should start their career as a CNA. This accomplishes two things, #1 It lets you "try on" this way of life, and #2 you gain some very important job skills that they never teach you in school. Especially time management and good old fashioned bedside nursing. All this with the added plus of earning a little over minimum wage. Please keep us posted on your progress!! We need SMART, CARING, AND HARD WORKING people coming in to nursing every day!!!!!!!!!! Sonnie
  9. 0
    I was 39 when I finished nursing school. I worked one summer as a nursing assistant in a nursing home when I was in school, and then I worked weekends as an aide in the hospital when I was back in school. I would recommend doing this for experience you might not get at school. Truthfully, your back could be a problem. If you begin as an aide or bedside nurse, there is no question there will be heavy lifting and tugging. Not knowing this, I learned the hard way that nursing is a very physical undertaking, and when you are older you have to give thought to this. I do not want to discourage you, but help is not always readily available as far as orderlies and extra nurses go. On the other hand, there are many different avenues in nursing and it can be a wonderful profession! Also, to be perfectly honest, it does take time away from your children-school can be grueling and hospital work can be all encompassing. So there's lots to think about.
  10. 0
    Oh, also meant to say that you have an advantage those of us who went into nursing years ago don't have. That's the internet; take advantage of it! I would read all the messageboards, nursing websites, medical news, etc. Quite honestly, some things may sound really negative but I think you'll find the truth also!
  11. 0
    I can't believe it! Last week I started reading messages on this board because I was wondering the same thing. I'm so glad you asked the question and have gotten so many positive responses. All week I've read one disheartening comment after another from nurses who are overworked, underpaid, unappreciated... and the list goes on. Since I was a candystriper in high school, I've wanted to be in the medical profession but didn't pursue it for many reasons. I'm 42 and still searching for a job that will give me fulfillment and satisfaction at the end of the day. I'm wondering if I'm just going through another career burnout, or is this really where my heart is? I would sure hate to spend the next three years going to nursing school only to find out it's not what I really want to do. No, you're not crazy, but I think I am. I'm looking forward to reading comments from veteran nurses.
  12. 0
    Would recommend if you go back to school,it would be wise at this point to get a BSN if at all possible. You are then in a better position for more jobs. Also, once you start working, it is difficult to start back to school for a degree.
  13. 0
    DAWN
    I GRADUATED FROM AN ASN PROGRAM 1 1/2 YEARS AGO. WHERE I WORK, ASNs AND BSNs ARE PAID THE SAME. BEFORE YOU DECIDE TO ENTER A BSN PROGRAM FIND OUT ABOUT YOUR AREA HOSPITAL'S CRITERIA SO THAT YOU DON'T PUT YOURSELF THROUGH MORE THAN YOU HAVE TO, ESPECIALLY IF YOU MAY SOON BE A SINGLE MOM!! I HAVE SPOKEN TO SEVERAL PEOPLE WHO HAVE GONE THROUGH THE SAME ASN PROGRAM AS I, THEN GONE BACK FOR THE BSN LATER - THEY SAY THEY DID NOT LEARN MUCH NEW INFO, THOUGH THEY ARE PLEASED TO HAVE A BSN.
    THE ONLY OTHER THING I HAVE TO ADD IS THAT I TOO HAVE CHRONIC BACK PAIN; NO MATTER HOW 'PROPERLY' YOU LIFT BIG PATIENTS, YOUR BACK WILL STILL HURT. AS A PEDIATRIC NURSE THOSE BIG, KILL YOUR BACK PATIENTS ARE FEW AND FAR BETWEEN (AND YOU DON'T MAKE AS BIG OF A MESS CHANGING DIAPERS EITHER!!!) IT IS STILL VERY OFTEN FRUSTRATING, BUT OVERALL VERY REWARDING. DON'T LET ANYONE TELL YOU "YOU WON'T HAVE TO LIFT PATIENTS, THAT'S WHAT TECHS ARE FOR" - I HAVE FOUND THAT TECHS ARE EITHER REALLY BUSY, OR REALLY LAZY! I PERSONALLY THINK THAT WITH ALL THE FRUSTRATIONS IN NURSING,AND IF YOUR BACK IS AGGRAVATED BY THE PROFESSION, YOU ARE NOT GOING TO SEE SATISFATION IN HOW YOU HAVE HELPED OTHERS BECAUSE OF YOUR OWN PAIN.
    GOOD LUCK, WE NEED GOOD PEDS NURSES!!!!!!!


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