Please share something GOOD that happened at work! - page 5

Maybe as a tag-along to the thread that has people in a twist over whether or not nurses are being positive enough, or too negative, or whatever, we could try for something a little upbeat. What... Read More

  1. by   liebling5
    "Oh, what the heck ... I'll admit it; I'm bawling."

    The story about Rose and Peter - Yes, indeed, me 2! (Sniff)
    Last edit by liebling5 on Mar 16, '07
  2. by   nursemike
    Wow. Some of these stories have definitely brought tears to my eyes. Big, manly tears, but still...

    Excellent thread! It reminds us what it's all about, doesn't it?
  3. by   BULLYDAWGRN
    I got paid today....
  4. by   Gromit
    Always a good and welcome event
  5. by   RNsRWe
    Hey, some days that's the best they got I just had nine patients and still got out of work on time; that's a big achievement for me!

    No one else has something GOOD that happened to share? I can't believe there's more "I hate nursing" threads than ones like this!
    Last edit by RNsRWe on Mar 19, '07
  6. by   RNsRWe
    bumping this
  7. by   Gromit
    Well, I'm waiting for my manager and several others to come together with a meeting (including myself) to discuss how I can come back to work -docs are giving me partial clearance to return -our floor has no defacto light-duty position, but I'm confident (as is my manager -who has been very encouraging throughout my illness -and if thats not something to say thats 'good' about my workplace, nothing is! ) we can figure out something. Since it seems its going to be a while before I'm given 'full clearance'.
    Hard as our floor is, I miss being there.
  8. by   oneillk1
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Maybe as a tag-along to the thread that has people in a twist over whether or not nurses are being positive enough, or too negative, or whatever, we could try for something a little upbeat.

    What has happened to you (or someone else?) at work that made you GLAD that you were there that day? Did you feel you made a difference?
    I had a patient last week, really sad case actually, the father had been driving the two teenage daughters and wa sin MVA, he was fine but one daughter was brain dead, other daughter (16yo) was head injured in ICU. I had her post extubation and she was extremely agitated and took a lot of calming down (invluding IV meds), was vocalising but not understandable, and generally very confused all night. I spent my whole shift reassuring her every time she woke up... etc etc, had no idea what was happening in her head or if she understood a word I said. When handover came I said goodbye to her parents who were there and she waved goodbye to me. Brought a huge smile to my face and made the whole night worthwhile!
  9. by   darrell
    Quote from RNsRWe
    What has happened to you (or someone else?) at work that made you GLAD that you were there that day? Did you feel you made a difference?
    This past weekend a visiting family told me I'd be a great nurse someday (I'm a tech/student) because of my "bedside manner". Mom was in the hospital for hypothermia and some confusion and, during a busy shift, I took five minutes to squat down by her chair and share a couple of laughs with the group.

    I love those moments. When I read about med errors and salary complaints and understaffing, I sometimes wonder what I'm getting myself into. When a patient smiles at me after I make that magical connection, I remember.

    D
  10. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from darrell
    This past weekend a visiting family told me I'd be a great nurse someday (I'm a tech/student) because of my "bedside manner". Mom was in the hospital for hypothermia and some confusion and, during a busy shift, I took five minutes to squat down by her chair and share a couple of laughs with the group.

    I love those moments. When I read about med errors and salary complaints and understaffing, I sometimes wonder what I'm getting myself into. When a patient smiles at me after I make that magical connection, I remember.

    D
    And D, it's those very moments you will NEVER forget, because it's the reason you keep going back day after day

    There's lots of ways to earn money. But what we get FROM nursing, beyond the paycheck....that's what I find irreplaceable!
  11. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from oneillk1
    I had a patient last week, really sad case actually, the father had been driving the two teenage daughters and wa sin MVA, he was fine but one daughter was brain dead, other daughter (16yo) was head injured in ICU. I had her post extubation and she was extremely agitated and took a lot of calming down (invluding IV meds), was vocalising but not understandable, and generally very confused all night. I spent my whole shift reassuring her every time she woke up... etc etc, had no idea what was happening in her head or if she understood a word I said. When handover came I said goodbye to her parents who were there and she waved goodbye to me. Brought a huge smile to my face and made the whole night worthwhile!
    I bet they won't forget you soon, either! Good job!
  12. by   carlarn
    Peter and Rose made me cry too!! I love that story.
    While it is always rewarding to hear a "thank you" from your patients, it is just as rewarding, if not more so, to hear a compliment from one of the other nurses.
    I had one of my colleagues tell someone she wished she could be more like me because I made every one of my patients feel like they were the only patient I had to take care of.
    One of my colleagues told me I inspired her to return to school. I was finishing my MSN and she went back to finish her BSN.
    One horrible day in the ED, I spent over three hours with a man who had been in an MVC with his wife and his sister-in-law. His sister-in-law was seriously injured, his wife didn't make it to the ED and his injuries were basically nothing.
    He had asked about his wife at least three times in the first 15 minutes he arrived. He told me he heard the paramedics ask for the coroner and wanted to know if it was for his wife. I told my ED doctor and asked him what did I do and should I tell him the truth about his wife? My doc said if I was comfortable telling him, then I should, but to check with the coroner first and call the hospital chaplin. I did both and walked into my patients room. He took one look at my companion--the priest--and said "This isn't good, is it?" I told him no it wasn't and of course began to cry. I spent a lot of time with this poor man. I found out his first wife had died of breast cancer and he didn't think he would ever find a woman he could love as much as her until his second wife came along. Now she was gone as well. I called his family for him, but everytime I would try to tell someone on the other end what had happened I began to cry again. (Boy I was effective that day!)
    A few weeks later I received the nicest note from this man, thanking me for all I had done. I have kept it and it has been many many years ago. Now that was a nice thing for him to do, but it was at the end of that horrible day when one of the nurses I was working with (who isn't one to hand out compliments) said to me, "You did a nice job with that guy. I don't think I could have done that. You stayed with him for hours and helped him."
    I don't expect thank you's from anyone, patients or coworkers, because I am doing my job. Yes they are nice and I won't turn them away, but I don't expect them.
  13. by   ambil
    Over the years I've experienced many positive and enlightening things. But there is always this one case that I often reflect on....
    A young married couple were struggleing through the last phases of cervical CA. The patient was discharged into home care. She and her husband were given the belief that she just needed to "take a little break" from Chemo and that she could start again in a few weeks. We knew in our station that she was sent home to die. So, we got everything set up at home, pain meds, parenteral nutrition and so on... after a few days I started working on finding out what they really knew and believed. I trusted my instinct and was then direct with the patient's husband and told him she had only a few weeks. I also talked directly to the patient and she had a very hard time letting go and accepting her condition. As predicted the situation developed as we all know it can and does. She died then but I wasn't there on that day. I felt very unsure for a few days if I had done the right thing. Then a friend of the family came to my home, with flowers for me and a moving letter from the patients husband. He thanked me for helping them experience these last weeks so close as they did. If no one had had the guts to say the truth, they wouldn't have had the chance to say goodbye.... I'll simply never forget it.
    Ambil

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