Please share something GOOD that happened at work! - page 4

Maybe as a tag-along to the thread that has people in a twist over whether or not nurses are being positive enough, or too negative, or whatever, we could try for something a little upbeat. What... Read More

  1. by   TazziRN
    Quote from muffie
    nobody died on my watch !

    Always a good thing...........
  2. by   DaughteroftheKing
    Ok so i love these stories...

    I have a general question though.. I want to subscribe to this thread..

    Does anyone know how to do that without being the original poster?

    Thanks
  3. by   Spidey's mom
    I think if you post on it, you are subscribed.


    Great stories . . . love the one about Rose and Peter.

    steph
  4. by   Dawnmartin
    a pt wanted me to go along to the nursing home with him since he was afraid he was going to be there forever instead of just for rehab after a nasty fall. he was very upset and didnt really understand why i couldnt go along since i was HIS nurse. i stopped in after my shift to see how he was doing since it was on my way home and he cried when i walked in . i was his nurse for only 2 days , hes 92 and lives alone so now ive got a new GRAMPA.... sometimes you just have to get attached, makes my day to see him smile:heartbeat
  5. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from princess_picklejuice
    This didn't happen to me personally, but some of my co-workers were...

    A patient, "Peter" was dying on our Cancer Care unit. All through his illness, "Rose" stayed by his side doing all that she could to make him comfortable. The staff found out that "Rose" was not his wife but that they had been together for over 10 years. When it was obvious that our patient was going to die soon, Rose called in their families to say their good-byes.

    One nurse who had gotten close to Rose discovered that the reason they never got married is that they didn't have any money for a wedding and Peter did not want to burden Rose with his illness.

    After a quick staff conference, the staff asked Rose and Peter if they wanted a marriage ceremony. They both started crying and said yes. In less than 3 hours, staff who were off came in with flowers, a white arch, a small wedding cake and a bouquet and veil for Rose. Dietary pulled together finger sandwiches, cookies and punch. Our hospital chaplain came up to do the ceremony.

    In front of family and the staff, Rose and Peter were married. He was unable to speak, being very short of breath, so our chaplain took his hand and said - Peter, do you take Rose to be your wife? If so, squeeze my hand. - and in front of everyone our chaplain said - Peter says I do. There wasn't a dry eye in the place.

    Peter died hours later.

    I'm proud to work with such wonderful people.
    You went ahead and did it. You made me cry. What a wonderful story!
  6. by   rnurse2b
    these was such wonderful stories.......I was teary a few times.
  7. by   kittagirl
    My older sister works in admin in my hospital, her two boys (6yr & 3yrs) came in with her hubby to meet her for lunch and I got off to go to join them in the canteen.
    They were queuing up to be served when I got there. The little one had forgotten I was meeting them.
    Squealed when he saw me ran over, climbed up me, and gave a BIG hug and kiss and then announced loudly to all the other staff queuing up
    'This is MY auntie and SHE's a Nurse'.

    It's amazing how having a 3year old be proud of you can change a crap day in to one of the best ever.
  8. by   Gromit
    Peter and Rose marriage -wow. You and your team definately take the 'Angel' Award! Brought a tear to this old bikers' eye That is just, well, there aren't any words for it. I'm glad you shared it. I read it out loud to my wife -she was moved as well.
  9. by   muffie
    Quote from princess_picklejuice
    This didn't happen to me personally, but some of my co-workers were...

    A patient, "Peter" was dying on our Cancer Care unit. All through his illness, "Rose" stayed by his side doing all that she could to make him comfortable. The staff found out that "Rose" was not his wife but that they had been together for over 10 years. When it was obvious that our patient was going to die soon, Rose called in their families to say their good-byes.

    One nurse who had gotten close to Rose discovered that the reason they never got married is that they didn't have any money for a wedding and Peter did not want to burden Rose with his illness.

    After a quick staff conference, the staff asked Rose and Peter if they wanted a marriage ceremony. They both started crying and said yes. In less than 3 hours, staff who were off came in with flowers, a white arch, a small wedding cake and a bouquet and veil for Rose. Dietary pulled together finger sandwiches, cookies and punch. Our hospital chaplain came up to do the ceremony.

    In front of family and the staff, Rose and Peter were married. He was unable to speak, being very short of breath, so our chaplain took his hand and said - Peter, do you take Rose to be your wife? If so, squeeze my hand. - and in front of everyone our chaplain said - Peter says I do. There wasn't a dry eye in the place.

    Peter died hours later.

    I'm proud to work with such wonderful people.
    ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL

    YOU GUYS ROCK

    brought a tear to my eye
  10. by   AliRae
    Quote from princess_picklejuice
    Peter, do you take Rose to be your wife? If so, squeeze my hand. - and in front of everyone our chaplain said - Peter says I do.
    I'll add mine to the misty eyes.

    Oh, what the heck ... I'll admit it; I'm bawling.


    My story happened a couple years ago in Zambia. I was there for the summer after my third year of nursing school, working at a little bush hospital. They were letting me do EVERYTHING, including delivering babies. My last little guy, it was just me and a traditional birth attendant (a trained Zambian woman). Everything was going well until the baby was born completely blue and "flatty" .. no HR that I could tell, refusing to breathe. And it was a Tuesday, so no electricity at the hospital. So I had to pray there was battery in the suction. No O2, no nothing. Lots of stimulation and druing and feet-flicking did nothing. I suctioned him and did a few chest compressions, just hoping more than anything. I felt like the entire world stopped right there.

    And then he cried.

    I went to see his mother the next day to tell her I was leaving the day after and asked her if she had chosen his name. Traditionally, they don't choose names until they leave the hospital, which would be in a few days for her. She smiled shyly and asked me to name him for her. I threw out a couple of suggestions, and she picked the first one.

    So, there's a little 2-and-a-half year old running around Zambia, named after my dad: Allan.
  11. by   CRNI-ICU20
    Oh, your stories are awesome....because you are awesome!!

    Here's my story...
    Today, I came to work, and was assigned a patient who's spouse is one of the top anesthesiologist's at our facility.
    I was given this assignment, because, in the words of my manager, "we knew you would be the best for both of them."
    This patient is dying....very very sad. The spouse, being a doctor, has not left the bedside for over 48 hours. The patient is young, but very very sick.
    Tonight, before I left, after a very hard day of chasing ABG's, vent settings, adjusting drips, addressing skin issues, etc....the spouse, (MD) approached me, gave me a hug, thanked my for my "excellent care" and said, "will you be here tomorrow?".....I had to admit, that "no", I will be working in a different unit, tomorrow".....the spouse's eyes teared up....because they stated, "I just want **** (the spouse) to have the best....and you are the best." This was such an incredible affirmation.....esp. when some of the people I have worked with have been not so nice during evalution time....
    It was so nice to hear the words from someone who truly sees my skills, and acknowledges them.

    SECOND STORY....GET YOUR KLEENEX:
    I was assigned a patient about a month ago, who was end staged COPD. In her 80's. She had been vented on and off many times....with recurrent pneumonia, etc. This time, she told her family, "I have had enough....I don't want another time on a machine....just let me go....keep me comfortable."
    As hard as it was for them to let go of their matriarch...they agreed.
    Her six sons, and six daughters, and husband of 58 years gathered round her bed....she was this beautiful Italian woman, with incredible hair and skin....she didn't look her age at all! Before I had even started morphine for her, she had started to kinda drift....but she suddenly opened her eyes....stared straight at the foot of her bed, and pointed.
    "LOOK!" "there's my dad.....he's standing right there....and he has a sack full of chocolate eclairs"....there's 11 of them...."
    Her family gasped!
    (Ten of her famiy members have passed on.....she would be the 11th!)
    Her son immediately went out, bought a huge box full of chocolate eclairs....and brought them to the bedside.....her family began to sing to her....say the Rosary around her bed.....and eat chocolate eclairs....
    I came into the room....and said, "what, are you not going to give her some?"
    They said, "we weren't sure if it was okay."
    "OF COURSE IT'S OKAY!!"
    So, we broke one open, and scooped out the filling....and I said to my patient, 'I have something really yummy for you, open your mouth..."
    And she did....and then
    The most incredible look of complete pleasure graced over her face.....
    she enjoyed that scoop of filling....even making yummy sounds.....
    with eyes closed....
    Within about two hours....she passed on....
    Her family wrote me the most precious thank you note....
    They said that seeing their mother pass with such a look of peace and pleasure on her face is a memory that will stay with them all their lives...
    Before she died, I made handprints of her hand with some special tempura paint and special paper that we have on our unit so that grand children will have a hand print of their grandparent, or loved one, as a memory....
    We made 12 copies that day....the family said this was such a comfort to them...to be reminded of their mother's loving hands...
    I was proud to be her nurse that day....to help her die peacefully, with dignity, and comfort....
    This is what nursing should be....everyday....
    This is what God meant for me to be to my patients and families.

    PS.....isn't it nice to know that there's chocolate in heaven?????
  12. by   nrsang97
    I have a few things some happened a while ago but what the heck.

    I had received a admit one night from one of our smaller system hospitals. Patient came in with a small suspected bleed on CT. Pt needed a MRI and this smaller hospital wasn't capable of MRI since they had no MRI machine. Pt was transferred to us early on a Friday morning. Pt waited all day Saturday for MRI and wasn't done. So I called before my shift ended at 4pm and asked when it would be done, was told Sunday after 11. I assumed 11am and Sunday rolled around and afternoon MRI still not done. I wasn't taking this pt that day and her mom came to me while I was coming back to the floor with my lunch and she asked me what was going on with the MRI. I told her I would call them and find out. I called and the MRI tech was so nasty to me because it wasn't a emergent MRI. I explained to the MRI tech that pt was transferred here to have MRI from a smaller hospital. Was there any way we could do this asap and I was told "If it isn't cord compression then we won't do it now, it will be done on MN shift." I explained that this pt and family were scared and if there was a way we could get this done because she was here only for the MRI and the sole reason we received her from the other hospital since they couldn't do one. MRI dept told me that she would be on call after 2300 since that is when we do inpatients period. I did tell them I would be calling neuro surg. I spoke with the team PA and he was livid and called them himself and the MRI was done within about 2 hours from my calling him. He changed it to stat and then the MRI was done. The patient and her family were so grateful. I still have the little card they left me. I think they were so happy that I took time to listen to the patient and family concerns and got the MRI done so that the patient felt better. I was able to discharge her the next day.

    I had one lady that would cry when I left at 0400. She became so attached to me. She was admitted after lumbar lam. Had complications got better, went to rehab. Had more complications. Got better, and while I was taking care of her and helping her get better, I was able to make someone who was so depressed feel better about herself. When she was finally discharged I walked her down for her nurse since I wasn't busy. It felt so wonderful to get a hug from her. I did end up taking care of her at another hospital a few years later. She and her husband remembered me and were so glad to see me.

    I had a patient recently. He had a lumbar drain secondary to CSF leak. He had his shunt internalized and it wasn't working. NA level was getting higher and he was getting confused. He was starting to get impulsive and trying to get out of bed without help and being connected to all kinds of iv's and heart monitor. I would catch him and remind him each time not to get up without my help. He was also having a ileus from the surgery. He was having terrible abd pain. I was giving him the lecture that if he kept getting up I would have to put a reminder jacket on him (posey vest I just don't tell the patient that, I also did everything I could not to have to get to that point) and I took extra time with him and made sure he was comfortable and had everything he needed, I was sitting in the chair by his bed and holding his hand and talking to him. He looked up at me and told me he loved me. I thought he was so cute. I also noticed no one had accessed his mediport and got a order to access it and this also made him and his wife so happy since they could get his labs off of that instead of poking him.
  13. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from CRNI-ICU20
    SECOND STORY....GET YOUR KLEENEX:
    I was assigned a patient about a month ago, who was end staged COPD. In her 80's. She had been vented on and off many times....with recurrent pneumonia, etc. This time, she told her family, "I have had enough....I don't want another time on a machine....just let me go....keep me comfortable."

    **EDITED FOR BREVITY IN QUOTE**

    PS.....isn't it nice to know that there's chocolate in heaven?????
    Tissues are now permanently placed next to my monitor. WAHHHHH! This is too beautiful. I had never heard of the handprints; it's a wonderful idea. And, personally, the idea that chocolate eclairs (one of my all-time favorites) live on is sweet in itself).

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