PLEASE HELP NSG STUDENT-DOSAGE/CALC

  1. 0
    I AM A NURSING STUDENT CAN ANYONE HELP WITH ANY FORMULAS TO HELP CALCULATE DRUG CONVERSIONS.EXAMPLE ;CONVERT 71/2 GRAINS TO MG.PLEASE HELP AND ANY OTHER CONVERSION FORMULAS WOULD ALSO BE APPRECIATED.
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  4. 0
    Hey! I know that the math can be a prblem but you have to remeber simple conversions. I don't know how you teacher taught you but we were given conversion charts to commit to memory. Like 60mg to 1 grain. Multiply your 7.5 grains times 60 and you get your answer. You'll catch onto it, If you need any help or want some conversion charts let me know.
    Brandy

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  5. 0
    Here is what you do:

    You are going to use this data to construct 2 triangles. I will try to put it in order:

    Gram
    15 1000
    grain----60-----mg

    Gram goes at the top of they pyramid
    the second tier [from the top down] finds the number 15 on the left hand side, and the number 1000 on the right side. End the left side by drawing an arrow from gram to the number 15, and then from 15, continue the arrow to the word GRAIN. On the right side of the pyramid, draw the line from gram to 1000 and then continue it to MG. In the center of the bottom tier, the line goe from grain to 60 straight through to gram.

    HENCE:

    1 gram equal 15 grains.
    1 grain equals 60 mg
    1 gram equals 1000 mg.

    NOW, the seond pyramid looks like this::

    1 Ounce
    8 30
    fluid dram
    tsp------------4/5--------------ml/cc

    Draw the 2 lines from ounce to the left and the right. Teaspoon is under fluid dram.

    1 ounce equals 8 fluid drams
    1 ounce equals 30 ml [which is the same as the cc]
    1 teaspoon equals 4 or 5 ml [which is the same as the cc].

    Construct these triangles and memorize them. You will never have aproblem with conversions again!
  6. 0
    It didn't look the way I thought.... let's try this again:

    1 Gram
    15--------------1000
    1 grain------60---------mg

    1 gram equal 15 grains.
    1 grain equals 60 mg
    1 gram equals 1000 mg.

    NOW, the seond pyramid looks like this::

    1 Ounce

    8------------------------ 30
    fluid dram

    tsp------------------4/5--------------ml/cc

    1 ounce equals 8 fluid drams
    1 ounce equals 30 ml [which is the same as the cc]
    1 teaspoon equals 4 or 5 ml [which is the same as the cc].

    I hope it works this time....

  7. 0
    ...um, are you without a textbook?
  8. 0
    Originally posted by seven:
    ...um, are you without a textbook?
    HI SEVEN....YES I DID BUY THE TEXT BOOK AND UNLIKE YOU MY LITTLE NSG STUDENT I HAVE BEEN AN LPN FOR 12 YEARS.I AM NOT SO GREEN THAT I RUMMAGE THESE SIGHTS TO PANDER TO MY INEXPERIENCED LITTLE EGO.I HAVE A CLASS THAT IS BEING GIVEN ADJUNCT WITH MY NSG CLASS.WE HAVE A DOSAGE MIDTERM THAT WE MUST SCORE 100 ON TO STAY IN THE PROGRAM.IF WE HAVE AN A AVERAGE IN NSG AND SCORE A 90 ON THE MIDTERM WE FAIL.SEE THE PRESSURE.I KNOW SIMPLE CONVERSIONS.WE HAVE PROBLEMS LIKE....
    PT IS TO RECEIVE 225 MG/KG.THE AVAILABLE DOSAGE IS 750 MCG/5MLS.THE PT WEIGHS 78 LBS.HOW MANY MLS WOULD THIS PT RECEIVE.ITS NOT A 2 + 2 = 4 KINDA PROBLEM.THE MIDTERM WILL CONSIST OF ONLY 5 PROBLEMS BUT WE HAVE TO GET ALL 5 CORRECT OR NOT ONLY ARE WE OUT OF THE DOSAGE AND CALCULATION CLASS BUT THEY AUTOMATICALLY DROP US FROM THE NSG PROGRAM.I HAVE A 3.7 GPA AND AM STRUGGLING.
  9. 0
    My school had a similar test and if we did not pass it we would be dropped from the program, regardless of GPA.

    My advice to you is to see if there are any tutors available that understand dosage problems. My school had one...I went to her and I passed my test with no problems. She explained the formulas used and gave me practice problems. I found the one on one sessions made the math more understandable than the books.

    As with the others that posted, I also had a chart of equivalents to commit to memory. Also, don't view this test as a one time thing that you'll never touch again. My school has a test every semester, they incorporate the math on regular examinations, it'll show up on NCLEX, and some hospitals give you a math test that you must pass before you can start orientation.

    Good luck to you.

    [This message has been edited by Rileycat (edited February 09, 2001).]
  10. 0
    Having been a tutor for many years I recommend using Ratio and Proportion to set up problems. This keeps the units in the correct order and lets you know where the X goes:
    Separate the Known (or what you have on hand) by an = Unknown (what the doctor ordered/what you need to give)
    So the problem is how many mg do you give when the doctor ordered 1/6 gr?
    Know: 1gr = 60mg
    Don't know: How many mg do I give?

    First use all the same units; so convert1/6
    gr to mg:

    Known = 1 gr : 60 mg
    Unknown = 1/6 gr: X mg

    1 gr : 60 mg = 1/6 gr : X mg

    first, multiply the "means" (the two inside) and put them on one side of the equal sign and multiply the "extremes" together and put them on the opposite side of the =.

    (60 mg x 1/6 gr) = X mg (1 gr)

    To get "X" by itself on one side of the = divide both sides by 1gr (whatever is next to the X):

    60 mg x 1/6 = X (the 'gr' cancels out)

    60 mg divided by 6 = X

    10 mg = X

    You can work out any problem using this method! But the catch is you must memorize your conversions or write them down and refer to them when setting up problems.
    Memorize your other formulas: VTBI/Time (min) x tubing factor = cc/min.
    Have fun with math!
    Good luck!
    Marty


  11. 0
    Sounds like your problem may be less the calculations and more with the program. I would screw up too just from the pressure. Remember on the floor you will have cheat sheets for conversions and other nurses to double check calculations, especially if they are fricking 5-6 step conversions. And every hospital I've worked at has required the MD to write in the least indecipherable language possible. NO GRAINS for example. If all else fails call the doc and say you need him/her to double check what you've come up with, to confirm the order, and then write a verbal order in the simpler units to cover yourself, and to avoid doing the calculations again the next night.
  12. 0
    My school also had a similar drug exam. You had to have a 100 to pass or you were out of the program. I know everyone has their own way of working problems, but I had trouble with them all until I started using the factor label formula. You can work ANY problem with it. Try to find out about it from your teacher. It makes even the hardest ones easier. Hang in there.


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