Please Help

  1. I have been in retail management for seven years after getting my BA. I am strongly considering nursing as a career change and have been looking at a BSN accelerated program. It's moderately expensive and 20 months (if I get in) Do I need the BSN or does an associates RN achieve the same results. I have a wife, two children and will be working midnights to keep food on the table while I'm going to school. Thanks for any advice, and please keep the "stay out of nursing" posts out! Thanks!!
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   fetch33
    I have been a nurse for over 20 years. I have my BSN degree. Get your Associates degree and get on with your life! You only need a BSN if you want to get into management at some point in your career.
  4. by   morte
    i would check out both....it would seem that you have background in mngmnt.....and CC can ,apparently be hard to get into.....gather your facts/figures, assess and formulate a plan....lol (nursing)
  5. by   ceecel.dee
    Quote from fetch33
    You only need a BSN if you want to get into management at some point in your career.
    Uuhmmmmm...this is a matter of opinion. There is more to a BSN than management prep. Talk to admissions in both tracks to sift out the differences...talk to as many nurses as you can...then make your objective decision.
  6. by   llg
    If the costs and time for getting your BSN (or an entry-level master's degree) is only slightly more than the ADN, then get the higher degree in the beginning. You'll probably want it later -- and going back to school yet again will be stressful for you and your family. However, if the difference in costs (and time) is enormous and the ADN is readily available, then starting your nursing career with an ADN makes sense.

    The entry level nursing jobs are the same regardless of what type of degree you get first. However, there are a lot more opportunities out there (and not just in management) for people with BSN's and above. In the long run, you will probably be interested in those opportunities. So, you'll want that BSN or Master's Degree. If it's possible to get it from the start, it's the best way to go. Since you already have a BA, the difference may only be a couple of classes. However, if the specific requirements of your local programs make the BSN much longer, harder, and/or more expensive at this point ... the ADN option is OK, too. You can get your BSN later and those BA courses should count towards your BSN completion program.

    As other posters have said, the "best" choice for you really depends upon the specific requirements, costs, and availability of the programs in your local area. Investigate each program carefully and see what the specifics of those programs actually are.

    Good luck,
    llg
  7. by   ukstudent
    If you will need to work while obtaining your RN, then from what others have written the accelerated program is NOT the way to go. Find out if they have a traditional length BSN. Either a traditional BSN or the ADN will allow you with good time management to keep working. Look up past posts about accelerated programs. Good luck in becomming a nurse.
  8. by   Imafloat
    I suggest you call the local nursing programs in your area, and see what type of program they have to offer. See who has a waiting list, see who goes to school through the summer, whose program is shorter.

    I was in retail managment and one day I had a God Breeze. I was listening to this lady rant about how I JUST had to find the matching tights for her daughters outift, no matter how many stores I had to call. I had my district manager on the phone wondering why my average transaction was less than $50 (this was a children's clothing store), and someone had called in sick. I just had a big realization that for all the stress I was experiencing that I needed to be saving someone's life. That moment was when I decided to go to nursing school.

    I went the BSN route and have never regretted it. The ADN program had a 2-3 year waiting list, it would have costed about half the price of my BSN. I have a lot of student loans but I am still 100% satisfied with my choice. I am waiting to start my first nursing job in a little more than a week, where if I had gone the ADN route I would not be graduating for another year at the earliest. I feel that working and making a nurses salary for that extra year makes up for the 17K extra I went in debt for the BSN (49K vs 17K). I also went to college previously and most of my credits tranferred and cut down the amount of time I was in school.

    I have seen posts on here that are just the opposite, no waitlist at ADN vs waitlist at BSN. Figure out what is going on in your area. Many employers pay for RN-BSN so do what gets you in the field the fastest if that is your desire.

    You may want to pmail me this, but what general area of the country do you live in? The school that I just graduated from offers a 15 month accelerated BSN with masters credits for people who hold unrelated bachelors degrees. I believe the tuition is covered and the students receive a stipend every month. The program is funded by a local hospital network as well as other grants. I believe upon graduation you "owe" the hospital network 2 years at their normal pay for nurses.

    Whatever route you go, best of luck to you!
  9. by   arciedee
    As others have said, look into both options. Also consider what you want to do in the future. If you think you will want to go on for an MSN see if there are programs near you that offer either RN-to-MSN programs or will allow RNs who have baccalaureate degrees in something other than nursing to pursue an MSN. If so the ADN may make the most sense at this point.

    I also agree with ukstudent. The general rule for accelerated programs is that you will not be able to work because of the demands of the program. You may want to check out scholarship opportunities and student loans. There may be low interest loans for nursing students in your area, repayment plans from local hospitals, etc.

    Do your homework and find out what will work best for your particular situation. Best of luck!
  10. by   AfloydRN
    The pay is the same for both in a hospital setting. Unless your goal is nursing management, ASN is a great place to start. You can always do BSN later.
  11. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from llg
    If the costs and time for getting your BSN (or an entry-level master's degree) is only slightly more than the ADN, then get the higher degree in the beginning. You'll probably want it later -- and going back to school yet again will be stressful for you and your family. However, if the difference in costs (and time) is enormous and the ADN is readily available, then starting your nursing career with an ADN makes sense.

    The entry level nursing jobs are the same regardless of what type of degree you get first. However, there are a lot more opportunities out there (and not just in management) for people with BSN's and above. In the long run, you will probably be interested in those opportunities. So, you'll want that BSN or Master's Degree. If it's possible to get it from the start, it's the best way to go. Since you already have a BA, the difference may only be a couple of classes. However, if the specific requirements of your local programs make the BSN much longer, harder, and/or more expensive at this point ... the ADN option is OK, too. You can get your BSN later and those BA courses should count towards your BSN completion program.

    As other posters have said, the "best" choice for you really depends upon the specific requirements, costs, and availability of the programs in your local area. Investigate each program carefully and see what the specifics of those programs actually are.

    Good luck,
    llg
    Great advice as always.

    My theory: Biggest bang for the buck.

    if community colleges in your area have 2-3 year waiting list, one year to 18month accelerated program will have you recouping cost by year three salary wise while others are just starting education.
  12. by   grace90
    Whichever college route you choose, go for it, good luck, and welcome to nursing!
  13. by   gggggg
    I applied to an ADN program and an accelerated BSN program and got accepted to both--I did the accelerated BSN because I would finish a whole year sooner and being able to start nursing a year earlier more than made up for not being able to work much while doing the BSN. Also I am getting twice as much in tuition reimbursement from my employer because I have a BSN--hourly wage is still the same though.

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