Plan B - page 5

Anyone else think Plan B will get GROSSLY out of hand? I think alot of 18 years old will be running to walmart every sunday nite! Also, cant it hurt a woman' s body if she takes Plan b too many... Read More

  1. by   catch33er
    I have always had one area of confusion about the "a fertilized egg IS life" way of thought. There are times when an egg is fertilized, but due to the timing of its fertilization (e.g., it's too low in the uterus), by the time it's ready for implantation a few days later, it's already "fallen" out of the uterus. Is that an abortion? Also, if you take any NSAID (ibuprofen, celebrex, naproxen, etc.), it can have the same effect as Plan B - decreasing the chances of implantation of a fertilized egg. Does that mean NSAID's need to be controlled/labels added?

    I am very happy Plan B will be available, but sad to know how many pharmacists will probably not stock it. For those in small towns, it may be just as difficult to get Plan B as to have access to a reliable birth control method.
  2. by   RNin'08
    Quote from catch33er
    Does that mean NSAID's need to be controlled/labels added?
  3. by   Jamesdotter
    According to articles I've read recently, Plan B will prevent fertilization by altering the climate, if you will, of the tube, and also by preventing ovulation. The prevention of implantation is rare--one authority thought it was "never". I wish I could cite the particular articles, but I did find some material by just googling "Plan B".
  4. by   flashpoint
    Quote from justpoorfect
    What, b/t/w, would be the rationale behind insisting on a pelvic exam before prescribing? What could you find that would contraindicate the drug except unexplained bleeding? And a PAP test is desirable in general, but is it your opinion that it should be mandatory before ANY birth control use? (If the prescription is dependent on the results, that is just delaying until the window of efficacy has passed.)
    I really don't know his logic...he just won't do it. His license, his decision. I live in a very conservative area...out of 12 providers in town, only ONE will even consider giving emergency contraception. We have two PAs that would do it if their physician supervisor would allow it...he has threatened to terminate anyone in his clinic who prescribes it. Personally, I would like to see all forms of birth control available OTC...it would prevent a lot of unwanted pregnancies...it might increase the number of people having sex, but...

    I think there are concerns about women who request emergency contraception frequently. I worry that the woman I know who comes to the ER a couple of times a year is engaging in high risk behaviors...I have concerns about disease, substance abuse (she has told me more than once that she was drunk and didn't know if he used a condom), physical abuse, because I know some of the people she spends time with, etc...
  5. by   SuperFlyRN
    I am a Pharmacist in Canada and Plan B has been available OTC to ALL AGES since then. Granted we dispense it a lot more-some repeaters-but considering I also work in L&D I see the other side. A decrease in unwanted pregnancies is alright by me. When I see the ppl coming in to buy Plan B and they can barely scrape the money up for that...probably a good thing in the long run.
  6. by   SuperFlyRN
    Quote from SportyNurse
    If I understand it right, the "morning after" pills, basically automatically induce your period, and happens to be extremely painful (intense cramping) from the unnatural uterine contractions. I'm sure it would definitely be an experience that a young woman would not want to go through again. So, I doubt it that it would be frequently used by the same person.
    The "morning after" pill -RU486 and Ovral21/28 are not the same as Plan B.
  7. by   rjflyn
    I'm curious if Plan B is going to be avalible for mail order like other medications are. So the women in the small town who's pharmacist won't dispense it can obtain it to have on hand for EC.

    From reading all the posts there are alot of what ifs. We still don't know how they intend to market it. My guess it going to be that they are going to encourgage the consumer to buy it and have it in advance of that oops.

    Also someone mentioning twice a year use as being alot. Well look at the failure rate of condoms. For example at 10% with someone using them 3 times a week that 15 failures over a year. That potentially 15 needs for EC.

    Rj
  8. by   Plagueis
    Quote from OB_or_NICU_hopeful
    I can't believe insurance doesn't cover BC pills......is that common? I've never had to buy them.
    My health insurance plan doesn't pay for birth control pills, or any kind of contraception. I have to pay $30 a month myself for BC pills. As far as Plan B goes, I'm glad that it will be available OTC, since it is only effective the first 72 hours after sex. Some women may be unable to get a doctor's appointment for a prescription in time for the pill to work, so Plan B being available OTC will be a livesaver for them.
  9. by   Meerkat
    "Plan B" has been around for a long time. I used it myself in 1998. All you had to do was walk into a Planned Parenthood or similar clinic and ask for it. It's basically like the Mini Pill, progestin only or NorQD, etc.
  10. by   Jamesdotter
    My husband raised an interesting question. What if the person proposing to purchase the kit is A) a male or B) an obviously post-menopausal woman? If it's available without an RX, can the pharmacy refuse to sell it?
  11. by   Jolie
    Quote from Jamesdotter
    My husband raised an interesting question. What if the person proposing to purchase the kit is A) a male or B) an obviously post-menopausal woman? If it's available without an RX, can the pharmacy refuse to sell it?

    I had never thought about the possibility of an older woman purchasing Plan B OTC for a young teen. I guess that doesn't worry me too much because that would at least indicate that the young teen has confided in a trusted adult and is receiving some guidance.

    What does concern me, and what I have been unable to find an answer to is this: Will men over the age of 18 be allowed to purchase Plan B? If so, I am concerned about the potential for older men to abuse young girls and then give them Plan B to prevent possible pregnancy.

    One of the pediatricians I used to work with refused to prescribe any contraceptives for women under the age of 18 unless they brought their mothers with them to the appointment. At first I thought this was terribly short-sighted and prevented young girls from acting responsibly to prevent pregnancy. He then told me that he adopted this policy when he learned that one of his young patients was being abused by a male teacher who "put her up to" going on OCs so that he didn't have to fear that a pregnancy would shed light on their "relationship".
  12. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from catch33er
    I have always had one area of confusion about the "a fertilized egg IS life" way of thought. There are times when an egg is fertilized, but due to the timing of its fertilization (e.g., it's too low in the uterus), by the time it's ready for implantation a few days later, it's already "fallen" out of the uterus. Is that an abortion? Also, if you take any NSAID (ibuprofen, celebrex, naproxen, etc.), it can have the same effect as Plan B - decreasing the chances of implantation of a fertilized egg. Does that mean NSAID's need to be controlled/labels added?
    .
    Thank You for bringing this up! Lots and lots of things can inhibit the fertilized egg from implanting. If that means it is an abortion then their are a lot of women aborting blasts around here. So women of childbearing age, if's it's been 2 weeks since your period, don't take ibuprofen as it can prevent ovualation, and if it's been almost a month since your last period don't take ibuprofen as it may impair implantation.
    It's been said that at least 30% of all pregnancies end without the woman even knowing as they just got washed out with the next period. Should we live in a bubble to prevent this from happening? Sheesh! When are people jsut going to mind their own business over other people's bodies?????
  13. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    Thank You for bringing this up! Lots and lots of things can inhibit the fertilized egg from implanting. If that means it is an abortion then their are a lot of women aborting blasts around here. So women of childbearing age, if's it's been 2 weeks since your period, don't take ibuprofen as it can prevent ovualation, and if it's been almost a month since your last period don't take ibuprofen as it may impair implantation.
    It's been said that at least 30% of all pregnancies end without the woman even knowing as they just got washed out with the next period. Should we live in a bubble to prevent this from happening? Sheesh! When are people jsut going to mind their own business over other people's bodies?????
    WELL PUT!

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