Places in the Heart

  1. The movie "Places in the Heart" is a 1984 movie which takes place in 1935 and is basically a story about a young widow who loses her husband, who is the sheriff, when he is accidentally killed by a young black man, as she struggles to raise her children and save the family farm.

    The movie ends with "community and in the midst of prayer. In a highly symbolic and imaginary scene, communion is passed among the assembled congregants at the church, hand to hand and mouth to mouth, between both the living and the deceased". (Wikipedia)

    I was retelling the story of my motorcycle accident in the thread, "Sharing Humor", remembering and appreciating those, both living and dead, who inspired me to become a nurse.

    I do not feel nor believe that I had a full understanding at the time of the impact those people, now dead, had on my life. I would like to wholeheartedly thank them for the influence they bestowed upon me.

    The young widow in the movie Places in the Heart shares communion wine with those who had a big impact on her life. Both her husband and the young man who killed him share communion.

    I would like to think that if I was in the role of the young widow in my life, I would be sharing communion with those who lovingly supported me during one of the biggest ordeals of my life- my family, loved ones, surgeons and other medical professionals- and the man who was responsible for nearly taking my life.

    It would be easy to thank those who positively impacted our lives. A little more difficult to thank those whose negative impact yielded, in the end, positive results.

    So- do you have anybody who you would like to thank whose negative impact yielded positive results in your endeavor to become a medical professional?
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  2. Visit Davey Do profile page

    About Davey Do, ADN, ASN, CNA, LPN, RN, EMT-B, EMT-I Guide

    Joined: Jun '10; Posts: 9,322; Likes: 36,115

    9 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Davey Do

    So- do you have anybody who you would like to thank whose negative impact yielded positive results in your endeavor to become a medical professional?
    Yes, but I couldn't say much more than that without being overly personal.
  4. by   Shookclays
    I have two.
    1. I finished high school when I was 16 (Fall '11) and started college at 16 (Spring '12). My very first major was pre-nursing but due to family members saying I wasn't brave enough to become a nurse (too timid/meek) I changed majors. Years later I used that as motivation to get back into the game and become a Registered Nurse that's continuing on into grad school to become a Nurse Informaticist/Psych-NP.
    2. When I was 16, a day before my 17th birthday, I decided to do something stupid and threatened to cut my arm. I was immediately taken to the Emergency Room and received placement in the worst psychiatric ward for adolescent girls. The psychiatrist never spoke to me, she placed me on TWO ADHD stimulants and a mood-stabilizing drug. When I came home, my BP was absolutely through the roof. I was immediately taken off of the drugs. This negative situation is the primary reason for me working in psych and continuing to become a psych-NP.
  5. by   Davey Do
    Quote from Shookclays
    I have two...
    My very first major was pre-nursing but due to family members saying I wasn't brave enough to become a nurse (too timid/meek) I changed majors. Years later I used that as motivation...

    ...When I was 16, a day before my 17th birthday, I decided to do something stupid and threatened to cut my arm. ... This negative situation is the primary reason for me working in psych and continuing to become a psych-NP.
    Excellent examples, Shookclays! You overcame adversity in order to pursue a drive within you to follow your calling!

    Well, at least that's my interpretation- Do feel or believe that your nursing career was a calling? I sense a calling to nobler cause as a result of your adversities.

    The mentioning of your mistreatment as an adolescent inpatient reminded me, however not on the same level of severity as yours, of a situation when I was recovering from the motorcycle accident. My right leg was in traction and I had casts on both arms.

    A nurse told me that I needed to be given an enema the day after I had had one with good results. I questioned its administration but she replied, "The doctor ordered it!"

    So I took it, waited, called for the nurse when I felt Mt Vesuvius was going to erupt, waited and waited and rang for the nurse and capped all over myself.

    The humiliation of that situation, both being incontinent of bowel and the subsequent hygienic measures, made such an impression on me that I carry the memory from time to time to this day. No patient under my care will suffer humiliation due to being incontinent. Having worked in both LTC and geriatric psych, I've been blessed with many opportunities to practice my stance.


    We have both been blessed, on varying levels, to light candles rather than to curse the darkness, Shookclays.
  6. by   Davey Do
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    Yes, but I couldn't say much more than that without being overly personal.
    Some time ago, Sour Lemon, after reading one of your posts, I sent you a PM stating, "I like your style".

    Although I don't always agree with your opinion, I respect the magnitude of thought which is obviously behind the words.

    There's a certain sweetness in the sourness, so to speak- although your waters are not still, they still run deep.
  7. by   OldDude
    Quote from Davey Do
    We have both been blessed, on varying levels, to light candles rather than to curse the darkness, Shookclays.
    I do not have a personal testimony in this regard...but, for whatever reason your statement about lighting candles rather than cursing the darkness, compelled me to offer this. An account of which I personally know to be true. A friend in my community lost her teenage son while he was working at a local convenience store during a robbery. The boy gave the robber every thing he demanded but the robber killed the boy regardless; cut his throat and left him to bleed to death - all recorded on the store video camera. Of course the woman was devastated. But after a period of time she surprised all who were acquainted with her and all who had only "heard" of the story by forgiving her son's murderer, face to face, and submitted an appeal to the Texas Parole Department to commute his death penalty to a life sentence, stating another death would be a crime against society. Her request was ultimately denied and he was executed by lethal injection. But she chose to light a candle.

    ...lighting candles instead of cursing the darkness...Thanks Davey, a good lesson, good lesson indeed.
  8. by   Davey Do
    Thanks, OldDude!

    This story is incredible, to say the least.
    Quote from OldDude
    after a period of time she surprised all who were acquainted with her and all who had only "heard" of the story by forgiving her son's murderer, face to face, and submitted an appeal to the Texas Parole Department to commute his death penalty to a life sentence, stating another death would be a crime against society.
    This is true forgiveness, the likes of which are rarely seen.

    On a related note, I've always wondered why those who have lost a loved one due to the actions of another would want the culprit dead. It seems they would be sending the culprit to the same place as the loved one. I would prefer to have the culprit stay around on this level of reality to suffer along with the rest of us.

    According to Edgar Cayce, there are eight different levels of reality, so if we believe that concept, the culprit would be sent to a different level of reality than the loved one, so that makes sense.
  9. by   Davey Do
    Quote from Davey Do
    According to Edgar Cayce, there are eight different levels of reality
    This may be a bit off topic, but this story illustrates one reason why my parents definitely have a place in my heart:

    My Dad always had a wonderful vegetable garden and we would enjoy the fresh fruits of his labor during the summer. But I don't like beets. My Ex, Kris, was a vegetarian and enjoyed all vegetables.

    Kris and I were having dinner with my Mom and Dad on one occasion when my Mom commented on a card I had sent to the daughter of a family friend who had attempted suicide and was an inpatient on an adolescent psych unit. The daughter's Mom told my Mom to thank me for the nice card in which I said that I would pray for her.

    "But (the daughter) doesn't believe in God", my Mom said, "she believes in reincarnation". "Well, Mom", I replied, "People who ascribe to the concept of reincarnation often believe that they live through successive lifetimes in order to raise their consciousness and reunite with The Universal soul who is, in effect, God".

    Mom said nothing, looking down at her plate, resuming her dinner.

    My Dad spoke up and commented, "You know, there might be something to this reincarnation thing. Heaven has got to be getting awful crowded with all the people who's lived and died".

    Well, Dad", I said, "time and space are merely concepts of this level of reality".

    My Dad paused, and replied, "So, Kris, you really like them beets?"
  10. by   JadedCPN
    While I don't have a personal story to share, I will say this topic and your story have reminded me of one of my favorite quotes about life in general: "In life you will meet two kinds of people. Ones who build you up, and ones who tear you down. But in the end, you will thank them both."
  11. by   JS McCabe, RN
    Quote from Davey Do
    . It would be easy to thank those who positively impacted our lives. A little more difficult to thank those whose negative impact yielded, in the end, positive results.
    I love that you just said this. Made me have to stop and really think about that.

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