Pick up Malpractice! They went after my license. - page 6

www.nso.com A few months ago I was unjustly fired after a resident died, after my shift, and after she had been released from the emergency room. She had trouble swallowing something at lunch... Read More

  1. by   Ayvah
    thanks
  2. by   Sabby_NC
    I am so sorry to read that this happened to you, I am sure it was an awful experience and I know my stomach would have done a backflip.
    In todays 'suing' society I would not be without any of my insurances.
    Nursing these days is more like walking on egg shells depending on the area of expertise.
    Just so relieved all turned out well for you.
    Take care.:spin:
  3. by   NurseShelly
    [quote=icuwant2rn;2114616]We were told the same thing in my nursing class and at my orientation in the hospital I currently work at. Perhaps I should rethink this.:uhoh21:[/quote


    I was also told the same thing during school and at my hospital orientation. In fact, at orientation it was nearly an hour long lecture on how the hospital will always back up and support the employees. Yeah right! This could be anyone of us. I'll be getting my own insurance asap!
  4. by   morte
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    The judge would find you in "contempt of court"...the same charge that they use when someone is being unreasonable, uncooperative, or disruptive in a courtroom. No further explanation is necessary. And you would be removed from the courtroom, fined, and receive possible jail time...when all you had to do was tell them, "Yes, I have malpractice insurance."

    I don't see why anyone would go through that to conceal their coverage.
    i think the judge would have to instruct me to answer before he could find me in contempt.....i wonder why the person who frequents this board who is a lawyer hasnt weighed in....
  5. by   Mom2therescue
    I have to carry individual malpractice insurance as an EMT and even as a phlebotomy student, I think one of the reasons the hospital I work at hired me is because I have that. I work as a patient care tech part time now as I go through the RN program at school. Its really not that expensive and good to have!!
    here: http://www.hpso.com/
  6. by   sirI
    HPSO is associated/alligns with NSO. Both underwritten by Affinity Insurance Services, Inc.
  7. by   Circl8r
    Quote from Suesquatch
    www.nso.com

    Thank goodness for my unit clerk, who refused to change her story after being requested to by the DON.
    It's a shame that you have such an unethical DON. I would hope that others would see that and report it to someone higher up.

    Congrats to you and your unit clerk for sticking to what's right!
  8. by   d'cm
    Malpractice insurance will NOT PROTECT YOUR LICENSE in any way or manner. It protects you financially if you are sued.
  9. by   elkpark
    Quote from d'cm
    Malpractice insurance will NOT PROTECT YOUR LICENSE in any way or manner. It protects you financially if you are sued.
    Well, it "protect(s) your license" in the sense that it pays for legal representation to defend you (and your license) if you are sued or brought up before the BON for any kind of disciplinary charges -- representation that would be v. expensive if you were paying out of pocket (the first hour of the attorney's time would cost you more than the annual premium for the insurance policy). In many cases, the company not only pays for the representation but supplies you with a specialized attorney experienced in defending nurses against these sorts of charges -- the kind of person you might well have trouble finding on your own.

    BTW, I have seen BON disciplinary hearings where the accused nurse did have an attorney representing her/him, and hearings where the nurse didn't bother with an attorney because s/her knew "I didn't do anything wrong" -- and (as a result) I would NEVER consider appearing before the board without an attorney.
  10. by   pippinsrosy
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    But malpractice ins will only help you if you are sued, and they are seeking damages from you... it wont protect your* license*, if you did something negligent...... am I correct, or wrong????
    It will also pay for your legal fees if someone files charges against your license with the state, which, if you need an attorney, can be VERY EXPENSIVE (I'm finding out the hard way, thanks to a vengeful former employer...).

    GET INSURANCE!!!! I wish I hadn't let mine lapse...
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from NurseguyFL
    What the instructor told you about being sued is true. Greedy lawyers will make an extra effort to drag you into lawsuits if they know you have liability coverage because they know they'll collect bigger money if you are found liable. I don't ever tell co-workers or employers that I have liability insurance.
    Seems like lots of people are assuming this is true but ... where's the evidence that this is actually happening? There is none. In fact, there's evidence of this NOT happening.

    IF lawyers are dragging RN's into lawsuits just because they have insurance, they obviously haven't been very successful in actually collecting that insurance money. Why? Because the premiums would be much higher than they are today.

    The fact that RN premiums are typically only $100 a year tells you that the insurance companies don't pay that many claims on RN's. If they did, they'd charge a hellava lot more.

    For example, NP's do have a lot more liability and malpractice payments so their premiums are much higher: anywhere from $600 - 1,000 a year depending on which state you're. And MD premiums run into the thousands.

    I just think people are worrying about this for nothing.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 20, '07
  12. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Suesquatch
    www.nso.com

    A few months ago I was unjustly fired after a resident died, after my shift, and after she had been released from the emergency room. She had trouble swallowing something at lunch and another nurse suctioned her.

    I was accused of neglect and reported to the state.

    I only found out about it because I got a letter back saying, and I quote, "There is insufficient credible evidence to support that you are responsible for the alleged incident." Thank goodness for my unit clerk, who refused to change her story after being requested to by the DON. She told him, "I told the truth, and I'm not changing it."

    Luckily I was cleared, but if I had to be fighting right new - whew!
    What exactly happened? I am lost between the patient died after your shift after being released from the ER. Another nurse suctioned her, and YOU got reported to the state??? How did the unit clerk get involved? I don't mean to ask so many questions, but I am trying to picture this scenerio. Also, were you forced to be unable to work while waiting for their decision?

    I always make sure I have my malpractice insurance for crap just like this...you never know.
  13. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    What exactly happened? I am lost between the patient died after your shift after being released from the ER. Another nurse suctioned her, and YOU got reported to the state??? How did the unit clerk get involved? I don't mean to ask so many questions, but I am trying to picture this scenerio. Also, were you forced to be unable to work while waiting for their decision?

    I always make sure I have my malpractice insurance for crap just like this...you never know.
    At lunch a resident said she had something stuck in her throat. She was talking so clearly had a patent airway. 20 minutes later another nurse decided she was choking and suctioned her. This nurse is the ADON's DIL. She sent her to the ER for a chext xr after talking to the doctor. I kept asking her (other nurse) if she wanted help and she repeatedly declined. The ER sent her back to us. Later that evening the resident died.

    They decided that I ignored her necessitating the other nurse's intervention. They fired me. I was out of work for a month and had to hire a lawyer to get them to give me a freakin' reference. I had no idea that I had been reported until I got the letter saying I'd been cleared.

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