Phlebotomy class question

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    I was thinking of taking a phlebotomy class to increase my knowledge and employable skills. In my state a LPN can draw blood if she's certified. I called the school and they said that they give the training to make me eligible for the certificate, but they don't provide the clinical experience. I must do twenty 'sticks' in order to be certified. I asked her where I would do sticks, and she was rather vague, saying maybe I could go to a testing clinic and ask them.

    Hmmmm...I think of liability issues and such, and wonder about that happening. "Hey I'd like do draw blood on your clients, hows the insurance company with that?" But I was thinking maybe volunteering with the local blood bank. Or maybe a home health agency would hire me and I could work with a nurse there to get the sticks. (But then, everyone wants the golden "one year of experience" and I'm a new grad.)

    Or maybe this isn't a good idea, and this school just sells these classes knowing their students won't get the clinical, and the school will get their money anyway. I dunno, what do you all, more experienced nurses have to say?

    Also I plan to take an IV certification course from another school, I will be certified after that class. So I will definitely take that. Should I just take this class?
    KUNursingStudent likes this.

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  2. 1
    Look for an IV cert class that includes blood withdrawal. Don't fall for this one. There are classes out there that also provide the clinical portion and those are the ones you should consider, otherwise, you will be wasting your time and money.
    MollyLPN likes this.
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    not from them, unless you can talk to someone else, like an instructor, who might know about clinical affiliations. We must have contracts with schools before we allow clinical rotations and if you are not a student you are not covered by the school's insurance.

    I wonder how much value you would get out of these courses. Why not spend the money on RN school instead?
    ObtundedRN and MollyLPN like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from classicdame
    not from them, unless you can talk to someone else, like an instructor, who might know about clinical affiliations. We must have contracts with schools before we allow clinical rotations and if you are not a student you are not covered by the school's insurance.

    I wonder how much value you would get out of these courses. Why not spend the money on RN school instead?
    Thanks for responding.

    I need to get a job before I can start RN school (I plan on Excelsior). I have to start bringing some money into my family. I thought that these certifications would help me get a job in home health or something. Nobody seems too interested in new grads, this might be a boost. I'm also doing volunteer work.
  5. 0
    Quote from caliotter3
    Look for an IV cert class that includes blood withdrawal. Don't fall for this one. There are classes out there that also provide the clinical portion and those are the ones you should consider, otherwise, you will be wasting your time and money.
    Thanks for responding, I think you have a good point.
  6. 1
    I have seen job listings in hospitals for CNAs who are certified in phlebotomy. Those pay well and would be a good job while you are pursuing your RN license. Go to the state website to find what the requirements are in your state for phlebotomists and go for the real deal so that you can qualify for a phlebotomy position or a CNA with phlebotomy position.
    colzanurse likes this.
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    I would encourage you to find out which organization you would be eligible for certification through and then follow up to make sure that the phlebotomy program you are looking at provides instruction/ experience that fulfills all the requirements. When I became a certified phlebotomist, I believe I had to have 100 successful sticks. It's been a while though - so things may have changed.

    One reputable organization is the ASCP - www.ascp.org. You might even check their website to see if they recommend any programs local to you.
  8. 0
    If you are taking an IV start class I don't see any reason to take a course in drawing blood. Starting an IV is more difficult than drawing blood, if you can start an IV you can draw blood!
  9. 0
    Sounds like they give you their own "certificate" not a national certification like from ASCP. At least 100 sticks are required for certification as a PBT (phlebotomoy technician).

    See the requirements here: http://www.ascp.org/FunctionalNaviga...ification.aspx

    So at least this way you know what you are looking for in a program/class.


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