Pets in the office? (LTC)

  1. 0
    I would like to liven up my office, which is located at a LTC facility. Another office worker sometimes brings her little dog to work and it stays in her office. I happen to like all animals and am especially fond of reptiles, but people shreek when I mention bringing my ball python to keep me company as I patter away on the computer and call families and doctors.

    Do you know anyone who has office pets? I know some facilities probably have strict regulations about animals, but if one person could bring their puppy why couldn't another bring their fish aquarium, snake or other pet?
  2. 24 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I have python balls too.

    I would never consider bringing them to work for any extended period of time. A visit perhaps.

    I would be very careful about who I exposed to your buddy too. Not everyone is receptive to these types of critters.

    Honestly, I don't get how you could work and mind your snake unless you had him/her in a tank.
  4. 0
    Yes, he would be in a tank. I have a beautiful terrarium and It would fit perfectly next to my computer. I would like to keep him here. I don't handle him very often but he has never stricken out or bitten. I think ball pythons are magnificent creatures. I've talked to some of the patients and some are actually very interested in seeing Nanook. Most people freak out when I mention it. May be a good deterrant for people I'd rather stay away.
  5. 0
    You're not handling him often? You are going to be putting him under stress by carting him back and forth daily to work unless you're mean to keep him housed at work the majority of time.
  6. 0
    I agree with Rua. Reptiles typically aren't travel-friendly. It's too much strain for them.
    About the reception, I love snakes, but I am also well aware that not everyone shares that love. Heck, the worst beating I (almost, if Daddy hadn't caught her) ever avoided was when I dropped a snake rattle in Mama's lap. Just the rattle, mind you.

    It's not restricted to work. The pet store where I have my Scottie groomed sells a wide range of animals, and at one time had a breeding pair of red-tail boas, Bonnie and Clyde. I asked to hold one of them, considering buying them (you know, I'd been married for 5 years and never knew DH was afraid of snakes), and was standing there with Clyde wrapped around me, head on top of mine, around my neck, around my middle and finally around my ankle (he was 7' long), when this LOL rounded the corner.

    Apparently she'd not had a lot of experience with snakes as apparel, because she screamed bloody murder, and ran to the back of the store. Irony was, about 2 weeks later, I saw her in my hospital, she remembered me, and refused to have "that snake-handling nurse" in her room.

    That being said, as long as you can keep him there for a good deal of time (maybe home for the weekends?), and you're not chasing anyone around with him, I don't see the harm. It's not like he's going to bust the glass and attack.

    Good luck. Something tells me you'll need it, lol!
  7. 0
    Ugh. I would be very put off by your snake. Yes, I'm sure he is beautiful, but I am very uncomfortable around snakes. Lots of people are. I would say if you want some furry company consider getting a couple gerbils or some fish. Or even a cat--have you read "Making Rounds With Oscar", about the cat who lives in the nursing home and sits with patients when they're dying?
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    Reptiles, including snakes, carry Salmonella. Children under the age of 5 and those with compromised immune systems should not handle a reptile or come into direct contact with someone who has handled a reptile. For liability reasons I would not bring a reptile to work at a LTC facility.
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    I might skip out on any pet that a % of the population has a strong fear of. I like snakes, but I recognize that some people do not. Some people are downright phobic. As someone who owned snakes, I would be concerned about stressing him out bringing him back and forth. You have to address the feeding issue if he's there long them, and some people are really upset by rodents or seeing a snake eat another animal. You have to address the mayhem that would happen if somehow he did get out: you know he's harmless but your residents do not.

    Someone mentioned salmonella, but ANY pet can carry diseases in. At least the snake is in a locked cage, away from people touching him. A dog can bring in fleas, ringworm, or RMSF to name a few diseases. Heck, bringing your kid to work with you can expose immunocompromised residents to flu, strep, and other infections.

    I might think a dog who is WELL BEHAVED is ok, provided management is ok with it and no residents have allergies. I don't mean to sound negative but most peoples' pet dogs can't pass the Canine Good Citizenship test, and that's a minimum requirement here for the therapy/visiting dog organizations in my area.
    mustlovepoodles and Ruas61 like this.
  10. 2
    No way. Think about the impact on others! There are a lot of people who are nervous around snakes or have actual snake phobias. So you'd be making it awfully difficult for anyone who has such an issue to walk into your office (i.e., co-workers, cleaning staff). I can tell you right now, I'd be spooked, and I'm not terribly nervous around snakes.

    Plus, given their propensity for escaping, do you really think that's a wise idea in such a facility?
    sharpeimom and mustlovepoodles like this.
  11. 0
    Quote from CeilingCat
    ...provided management is ok with it and no residents have allergies.
    ...and staff!


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