Petit Mal seizures in adults over age 25?

  1. Anyone ever seen, know, or heard of any adults that have petit mal seizures?
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Yes. Had a friend who has since died of complications her epilepsy. Certain things could bring on grand mals, which she often also had in her sleep, but we would be together and she would just blank out for a few minutes then seem to come back.

    Sometimes she'd notice, or we'd notice, and someone would say, welcome back, and she'd say something like whose turn it is (we played cards a lot).

    But in answer, yes, definitely.

    About the etiology, etc., I'd have to look it up.

    Curious--what experience generated the question?
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I'm thinking i've been having them for years and just never knew what it was. Used to get accused of daydreaming in elementary school for staring off into space for 5 minutes at a time, when actually my vision would automatically blur, breathing would become shallow, and hearing was very low. That would last about a minute at a time.

    Still happens now, i notice i feel it coming on and can sometimes fight it. I notice though after one of those episodes happens, i'm more awake and relaxed. Seems like stress is a good trigger for this. And it's never happened while driving.

    Once i graduate, i'm getting an in-depth physical, since i know i have sleep apnea, some sort of heart dysrrhythmia that gives me occaisional heartbeats that feel like a defibrillator gave me a jolt, tachycardia ranging from 110-130, getting nosebleeds 2-3 times a week anytime any place (BP and bloodwork all normal), and plus these space-out episodes.
  5. by   Quickbeam
    Absolutely, adults can get all forms of seizure disorders. I believe only half of all those with seizure disorders begin before adulthood. One of the fastest growing groups with new onset seizure disorders is those over 65.

    I know this because I oversee a state Dept. of Transportation's medical review unit. Seizures are one of the most common reasons people have to stop driving. I do record reviews and most of those I see began to have seizures after 25. Very common.
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Thing is though, everything i read about the petit mal seizures is with children. The only thing i find about petit mal seizures where adults are concerned is the usual brief line "can occur in adults too".
  7. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    some of your childhood history sounds a wee bit like attention deficit disorder. however, your last paragraph has my complete attention....

    ahem. tap-tap....

    lpn2be2004, my dear, do not wait until you finish nursing school to get a workup. you have described too many symptoms that could easily be related to some serious difficulties, or could, by themselves, put you (and maybe others around you) at risk for injury.

    remember part of our being good nurses is being good role models. take care of yourself. you'll be a better nurse for it.

    if you cannot afford care, check for a community health center (they use sliding scales and don't deny treatment for inability to pay), or work out an arrangement with your doctor where you can pay off the fees after you graduate and are out there earning some money. sometimes they will take care of you for little or nothing, because you are coming into the profession.

    i'm also sending this to you by pm, because i want to be sure you receive it.

    take care, and let us know how it goes.
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Well unless someone plans on picking up my medical tab then it's just going to HAVE to wait because i HAVE no choice. I do not have the luxury of health insurance. It was either health insurance or food. The community health center says i make too much money to qualify for a sliding scale. Trust me, i have asked around, looked around, called every phone number in the book, internet, etc. And mentioning that i'm in nursing school only got a "oh that's nice, dear".
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Mar 10, '04
  9. by   jnette
    Quote from chris_at_lucas
    some of your childhood history sounds a wee bit like attention deficit disorder. however, your last paragraph has my complete attention....

    ahem. tap-tap....

    lpn2be2004, my dear, do not wait until you finish nursing school to get a workup. you have described too many symptoms that could easily be related to some serious difficulties, or could, by themselves, put you (and maybe others around you) at risk for injury.

    remember part of our being good nurses is being good role models. take care of yourself. you'll be a better nurse for it.

    if you cannot afford care, check for a community health center (they use sliding scales and don't deny treatment for inability to pay), or work out an arrangement with your doctor where you can pay off the fees after you graduate and are out there earning some money. sometimes they will take care of you for little or nothing, because you are coming into the profession.

    i'm also sending this to you by pm, because i want to be sure you receive it.

    take care, and let us know how it goes.

    yeah !!!

    see? now it's your turn to get fussed at ! :chuckle i got my share yesterday. and if i have to go, so do you !!! (neener)

    seriously, though.. that last paragraph is disconcerting, and you really do need to get these things looked into the sooner the better. please do.

    as far as those "blankouts"... i have them a lot.. and actually welcome them. while i remain fully aware of my surroundings, what's being said and done, it's like i'm somehow temporarily separated from all that and not to be disturbed ! my eyes remain fixed on whatever they happened to be gazing or looking at at the time and refuse to be distracted. the peace and tranquility of these 20-30 seconds or more is insurpassable .... and it's almost as if i dare anyone to disturb/disrupt it... kinda like being frozen in time. it is, as you say extremely rejuvenating once you have "snapped out of it".

    actually, i prefer to call them my "zone outs"... because i do remain capable of interrupting this period of utter bliss if i absolutely have to... i can recognize when my body or mind wants to go there (has happened while driving once) and i can control it by whatever means necessary and not allow it. but usually, unless it's a situation where i really cannot allow it to happen, i go with it... even in restaurants... dinnertable.. wherever. i've had dh wave his hand in front of my eyes and i hear him trying to get my attention... but too bad.
  10. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    lpn2be2004, it hasn't been that long since i had to make those kinds of decisions (food versus medical care). it's awful! actually, i am not too far from it at present, but am fortunate enough to be able to do both, so long as something awful doesn't happen. (dh and i both out of work for too long now--it's how i happen to be doing school, though....)

    i fear you were offended by my email. my intention couldn't have been further from that--i am concerned and i care, woman to woman, student to student, future nurse to future nurse. i feel like the people i "meet" on this bb are friends and, occasionally, family. if i could help you with those bills, you bet i would.

    please know my intentions were entirely honorable and without criticism or judgment.

    take care!
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from chris_at_lucas
    Please know my intentions were entirely honorable and without criticism or judgment.
    Noooooo i didn't take your email or post the wrong way, it's just that i'm frustrated that i get told i make too much money, yet, like i said, i had to choose between health insurance and food. I know a lot of people have the same decision, just annoys me to try over and over to find a way, and a year later STILL come up empty.
  12. by   concernedreader
    Hi Nurse, I am a searcher of information because my 77 year old sister is describing symptoms that sound like petit mal. I am responding to this thread because, although I am not wealthy just the opposite, I would send a little money to you for your medical bills. What I read in your messages and those who responded to you is this: you might die while you are waiting until you have health insurance. Go to the doctor. When you get the bills, send them $10 per month, or whatever you can afford and they can not stop you care. But you need to go, for your life's sake, or we will have a dead nurse-to-be instead of a nurse. lfincognito at hotmail.
  13. by   NRSKarenRN
    Thanks for your thoughts. Original poster is now an RN and has health insurance, haven't seen her posting in a while.

    This thread was started in 2004- seven years ago, so closing now.
  14. by   AmberRWatson
    Hi Nurse.
    I've never written on one of these before, but I was doing some research on Petit Mal Seizures and your title got my attention.
    I am a 24 year old female, graduate student. I was diagnosed with Petit Mal seizures when I was 7 years old. The doctors said I would eventually grow out of them in my late teens, early twenties, but they are still alive and kicking.
    I have seen a decrease in my later years - Now I can figure out my triggers (flashing strobe lights, stress, lack of sleep, hunger, hyperventilation).
    I'm not an expert by no means, but for some reason I thought I'd finally take some serious time and research a disease I have been living with for so long. So, if you have any questions - just let me know. I hope I can be of some help. Not sure how I'd check a reply but I'm hoping it will come to my phone! Lol. Take care and God bless.

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