Personnal lives or reckless? - page 5

i have a question as nurses when should it be a "you should know better because your a medical professional" or if it is just living out lives? see i often wonder if my hobby is one of... Read More

  1. by   GEO
    [quote=still riding]i have a question as nurses when should it be a "you should know better because your a medical professional" or if it is just living out lives?

    see i often wonder if my hobby is one of recklessness or not. i ride horses, but not only ride its kind of a passion. i compete (or did last summer) and i do quite a bit of training. so here is the reckless part, i take 1500 pound animals to 4ft fences at quite an alarming pace (its faster than it looks). and if the horses get scared or just doesn't agree with my plans i can end up kissing the dirt or worse the fence or the horse's feet. i also start from scratch on several horses each summer, being the first one on a horse is an incredible feeling, and being with them as they start to understand that riding can be a fun and exiting.

    i feel on top of the world when i'm riding and at the barn, i would never give up that feeling for anything. i know it is a dangerous hobby, and i have my riding injury list (a few to many broken bones, and 3 concussions) but to me it is worth it.

    what hobbies do other nurses have that maybe could also be considered reckless or fall into the category or "you should know better"? i'm just trying to learn more about the people whose profession i will soon be joining.

    thanx sr


    _________________
    i reread and edited and some of the spelling and grammer, but i'm sure it's still not perfect [/quote

    i love horses!!! happen to raise little ones. have 3 in the pasture now with their mama's. these animals have a soul....(i think for what its worth). raising 4 boys by myself was the reckless part of my life..now i am content to enjoy the horses and family/grandbabies. the kids love to come to grandma's farm and see what babies are new. nursing is exciting enough for me. good luck to you in nursing. a timid person will have a hard time in your chosen profession, so go girl! and remember to be kind to the new nurse who might need your support.
  2. by   Farkinott
    Quote from wannabee
    As far as hobbies go, I say "to each his own."

    BUT, as far as you joining the profession, I suggest you take a refresher course in grammar and spelling before you apply to nursing school. Didn't you just graduate from high school? How can your grammar be that bad when you just got out of school? Just how many concussions have you had?

    I'm sorry to be so mean, but I am applying to nursing school late in life and I am very nervous about getting into school. It makes me sick to know that people who can't even speak or write their OWN language could be accepted.
    Boo! Boo! and Boo!
  3. by   Used and abused
    Quote from wannabee
    As far as hobbies go, I say "to each his own."

    BUT, as far as you joining the profession, I suggest you take a refresher course in grammar and spelling before you apply to nursing school. Didn't you just graduate from high school? How can your grammar be that bad when you just got out of school? Just how many concussions have you had?

    I'm sorry to be so mean, but I am applying to nursing school late in life and I am very nervous about getting into school. It makes me sick to know that people who can't even speak or write their OWN language could be accepted.

    Lets look at the facts; Spell check and all may be wonderful online but when you are charting, the computers rarely, if ever, have spell check and there is absolutely little time to look up spelling. It is a fast paced world out there, takes all you can do to get through most shifts. Papers in college are one thing; doing charting is another. Professionalism is necessary as you could find yourself in court someday defending your charting. This is not meant to be a "pick on someone day" or even to be a rough crowd statement. I am plainly speaking the truth in black and white. Handwriting, spelling, grammar etc. are all important in communicating to the doctors and other nurses. Poor spelling does reflect on intelligence and education. Those are the facts.
  4. by   redshiloh
    You know, I wonder if wannabe was just trying to 'get a rise out of us'. Very successfully I may add.
    Good spelling and grammer do not always indicate that a person has any 'horse sense'. My dad likes to point out, and I have also noticed that there are idiots at all education levels.
    I also love horses, just don't ride too well.
    As a spinal cord injury nurse though, I encourage you all to wear helmets, seatbelts ect during hobbies that my hurt your neck/head.
  5. by   movealong
    I love to hike and backpack. I personally don't think it's dangerous, but people in the past have expressed their concern when I used to do solo backpacking in wilderness areas.

    I used to hike in for 3-4 days, away from everyone. Although I know bears are out there, I've never had a problem. The closest encounter was one night I heard a bear trying to get my food. I had slung my food stuffs in a sac over a tree branch high up. I tied my pots/pans to it, so they would make noise and let me know if a bear was attempting to get my food. It worked. I was woken up by the sounds of my pot and pan clanging together. I started throwing rocks I had collected for this purpose at the bear and scared him off. It was a question of letting the bear get my food, or having to hike 3 days back out without food.

    I do usually get a backbacking permit from the rangers so they know I am out there. I also usually let someone know when I should be home. If they don't hear from me on the appointed day, they would contact the proper people.

    I find peaceful and relaxing. No phones, no TV, no beepers, or computers.
  6. by   Jen2
    I used to have horses when I was in High School. I used to barrel race too. In the spring my grandfathers friends would bring their horses to his farm for me to break. I loved doing that, but the hardest part was at the end of the summer I had to give them back. I don't get to do too much riding know except for the occaisional trail ride once a year. I have also tried white water rafting and almost drowned, so I'll never do that again, but at least I can say I tried it. I commend you for knowing what you want to do at such a young age. I knew I wanted to be a nurse since I was 7-years-old, but didn't have the guts to start college until I was 23. Best of luck to you.
  7. by   sashibeak
    Good for you, girlfriend! Believe me, it is good to have something that excites you aside from nursing. My love is yoga......... I couldn't live without it. After the stress of school and nursing, it is wonderful to be able to lose yourself in something totally different.

    Ride, baby, ride!

    P.S. Don't worry yourself about any of the grumps that like to bully you on this board. We are not all like that!
  8. by   EarthAngel
    [QUOTE=wannabee]As far as hobbies go, I say "to each his own."

    BUT, as far as you joining the profession, I suggest you take a refresher course in grammar and spelling before you apply to nursing school. Didn't you just graduate from high school? How can your grammar be that bad when you just got out of school? Just how many concussions have you had?

    I'm sorry to be so mean, but I am applying to nursing school late in life and I am very nervous about getting into school. It makes me sick to know that people who can't even speak or write their OWN language could be accepted. [/QUOT

    How rude. One would think, that as a "nurse" one should/would have more compassion and understanding towards others for any "deficiencies" they see in another, rather than judge them and jumping to conclusions. I guess that's why you chose the name "wannabee"....
  9. by   EarthAngel
    As far as dangerous hobbies go, I guess I could say I'm guilty of tattoos, piercings and mosh pits.
    To each his/her own. As long as you're not endangering others, then nobody should be allowed to tell you what you should or should not be doing. And as a nurse, I think we have an advantage over some in our choices, because we're more careful in how we go about taking part in our hobbies. The right protective gear (except for that unprotected sex thing... :P) and such.
    but what do i know.. i have poor grammar..
    *beats the dead horse with a stick* AND STAY DEAD!
  10. by   teeituptom
    as for dangerous hobbies

    there is always golf, yes golf can be dangerous

    I also enjoy my Harley

    I also enjoy skydiving

    I also hunt, try hunting snakes. Thats an activity with a lot of Bite, hahahaha
  11. by   Speechie
    Some of the smartest people i work with spell "speech" as "speach" (who also happen to be neurologists and other physicians). I just go ahead and do my thing!
    Risk??? this time of year my biggest risk is getting hit on the head with a stray soccer ball as i sit on the sidelines
    peace
  12. by   jnette
    Quote from earle58
    and one of the very first things you'll learn in nursing school is not to be judgemental. and for your own peace of mind??? don't sweat the small stuff.
    just worry about yourself before you feel the need to criticize others.

    A hearty AMEN to that, Leslie.

    And Deb's right on the money, as usual. We are nurses, yes, but we are also individuals.. and as such, are no different than any others. We do what we enjoy... life is to be lived ! There is a difference between potentially dangerous and just plain STUPID.

    I love riding my motorcycle.. like your horses, it's in my blood and I'll be riding when I'm eighty if I'm still able. Still want to go crosscountry and up into Alaska on my bike someday.. by myself.
  13. by   Lilith
    Our passions are what give our lives quality! What good is it to live forever if you are bored to tears? My hobby/sport is kickboxing....how strange is that for a nurse? Here I am, studying and practicing ways to intentionally hurt someone else. It is great exercise, and teaches you how to control your body well...and the big, red bag always lets me win. In the ER, I have had opportunity to practice real life blocking and ducking techniques but I have NEVER hit or kicked anybody. Don't even know if I really could overcome the "nurse" and act offensively. Probably not.

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