Person who has a seizure - page 6

I'm curious as to how you would answer this. I was in disagreement with The Red Cross when they taught this. I really had no business taking a CPR course from them since I was a nurse and my... Read More

  1. by   Norma56
    I am curious if the person having the siezure is truly in trouble.
    I see someone wanting to perform cpr...(I mean, did the heart stop?)
    As someone with a history of dealing with tonic-colonic patients, unless status epilepticus has set in, comfort and compassion on awakening work well. Padding under the head helps during.
  2. by   stphnrnm
    I agree with most of what has already been said, the first thing to do is to prevent injury, position the individual. if possible insert a wadded piece of cloth between the teeth to prevent them from biting their tongue (watch out that you do not get bitten in the process), in the interim instruct someone else to call 911, while someone, else even yourself, time the seizure and make note of which body parts are involved in the seizure.If there is someone around who may have witnessed it from the beginning, and any precipitating factors eg. slip and falletc. this is very helpful information. Err on the side of safety ALWAYS call 911.
    stphnrnm
  3. by   tlhubbard
    Quote from stevielynn
    I've had 2 normal EEG's and 2 normal MRI's.

    My neuro and the ER doc both said that adult onset seizures rarely have a discernible cause. And 60% of the time you never have more than one. I had two 6 months apart so I went on medication and it has been almost 2 years.

    All the research I've read says the same thing about adults - no abnormal EEG's or MRI's.

    When it comes to kids though - I am not sure.

    steph
    Thanks Stevielynn and Susan for your input. I will try not to worry (too much). I was told about the hormone issues as a potential cause. It's very disturbing, but thanks for responding to the question. We are going through the only Childrens' Hospital in the area, and they have run her through every possible test. I hope I have her in capable hands. Thanks again.
  4. by   mydesygn
    Quote from stphnrnm
    I agree with most of what has already been said, the first thing to do is to prevent injury, position the individual. if possible insert a wadded piece of cloth between the teeth to prevent them from biting their tongue (watch out that you do not get bitten in the process), in the interim instruct someone else to call 911, while someone, else even yourself, time the seizure and make note of which body parts are involved in the seizure.If there is someone around who may have witnessed it from the beginning, and any precipitating factors eg. slip and falletc. this is very helpful information. Err on the side of safety ALWAYS call 911.
    stphnrnm

    Oh my god-- Do not ever stick anything in a seizing persons mouth. By sticking anything in a seizing person's mouth, you will cause an injury to them and yourself. They are more likely to break a tooth or possibly aspirate pieces of the object that you placed in their mouth. If they are drooling or any emesis, a cloth will likely get in the way of them being appropiately sunctioned. In 14 years, I have only seen one person actually bite their tongue during seizure, after placing a bite block in, that person broke their tooth. By the way, I work in an epilepsy monitoring unit and we are instructed to never put any object in a person's mouth during a seizure.
  5. by   firstaiddave907
    i was tought a coupple of moths ago at a heart saver cpr and first aid class is not to touch the persion haveing a sezure and make sure there is no danger of the pacient of hitting ther heads and i would sen someone to call 911 now a days peopple have cell phones they can use so it cuts down on the time to run to a pay phone dial 911 and run back and forth to check on the pacient. at leats thats what i was tought unles that was the wornge way i was tought.
  6. by   Bipley
    Quote from stphnrnm
    ... if possible insert a wadded piece of cloth between the teeth to prevent them from biting their tongue (watch out that you do not get bitten in the process), ...
    No no no... NOOOO~
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from mydesygn
    Oh my god-- Do not ever stick anything in a seizing persons mouth. By sticking anything in a seizing person's mouth, you will cause an injury to them and yourself. They are more likely to break a tooth or possibly aspirate pieces of the object that you placed in their mouth. If they are drooling or any emesis, a cloth will likely get in the way of them being appropiately sunctioned. In 14 years, I have only seen one person actually bite their tongue during seizure, after placing a bite block in, that person broke their tooth. By the way, I work in an epilepsy monitoring unit and we are instructed to never put any object in a person's mouth during a seizure.
    You are right - never place anything in a seizing person's mouth.

    However, I did bite the sides of my tongue both times and had a very sore tongue for a day or two.

    steph
  8. by   boulergirl
    Oh my god-- Do not ever stick anything in a seizing persons mouth. By sticking anything in a seizing person's mouth, you will cause an injury to them and yourself. They are more likely to break a tooth or possibly aspirate pieces of the object that you placed in their mouth. If they are drooling or any emesis, a cloth will likely get in the way of them being appropiately sunctioned. In 14 years, I have only seen one person actually bite their tongue during seizure, after placing a bite block in, that person broke their tooth. By the way, I work in an epilepsy monitoring unit and we are instructed to never put any object in a person's mouth during a seizure.
    I had a debate with my coworkers about this. They firmly believe that you should put something in their mouth and their argument is that the tongue could fall to the back of the mouth, blocking the airway, and then they could die. I tried to explain to them why it's dangerous and counterproductive to try to put anything in the person (especially a spoon!). Of course I got nowhere with them, so I dropped it.
  9. by   vamedic4
    Please remember though that anyone who ends up dying from a seizure dies a hypoxic death until proven otherwise. During true grand mal seizures the patient is not getting enough oxygen to perfuse the brain, much less the other vital organs. Many times if you watch seizure patients, you will see and hear them "gasping" for air on their own but their body has limited control over these necessary functions during the episode. It is for this reason in the clinical and field setting that we apply blow by oxygen as needed to EVERY seizure patient, with some needing respiratory assistance with a BVM and, occasionally, intubation.
    Yes, turn them on their side - they occasionally vomit during or after the seizure. Also...find someone they know who can explain things to them. Coming out of a seizure in a mall or other public place is hella scary for anyone, as they are generally not oriented to person, place or time for a little while. The more familiar the faces they see, the faster their recovery time will usually be.

    vamedic4
    AND NEVER NEVER NEVER STICK ANYTHING IN THEIR MOUTH!!!!



    Quote from Bipley
    I agree with Steph. You have no idea if the person is apt to have seizures or not.

    I learned something years ago from a neurologist and I have never met anyone that was familiar with this. I have had need to use it rarely, but it has worked for me the few times I have used it.

    If the person is also not breathing and turning blue, pinch their nostrils together. It signals the brain to breathe and it works. They gasp for air about 10 seconds after you do it.

    Besides, think about it. On the rare time that they do quit breathing, you aren't going to hurt them but pinching their nostrils together.

    First time I ever used this was with a care home employee. I was called to the kitchen where he was in an active seizure. He was blue as blue could be. Someone else was calling 911 and I remembered what old Doc Heines told me and I did it. Worked like a charm. While he continued to seize, he was finally breathing.
  10. by   Norma56



    I cannot stress the not putting something in the mouth enough. A spoon???? Goodbye teeth. The tongue is attatched well, and I have yet to hear of someone "swallowing it" especially if they are on their sides and being cared for.

close