Person who has a seizure - page 5

I'm curious as to how you would answer this. I was in disagreement with The Red Cross when they taught this. I really had no business taking a CPR course from them since I was a nurse and my... Read More

  1. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from TweetyRN
    What license was lost? Driver's or Nursing? Donno why this would be an issue re Nursing license? The standard protocol is after 5 minutes call 911, but since it takes a while for them to get there, realistically that 5 minutes really doesn't mean much. Since this was a stranger, I would call 911. Ya never know what other comorbidities may be playing out too. Sometimes, sz are triggered by Cardiac, metabolic, and others as well, so to have 911 there to assess them from a Medical standpoint is a very good thing. I want to add that after 30 minutes of seizing, permanent brain damage can occur so you never let a person seize until it stops. Use the 5 minute rule as your upper parameter. To the one whose child has had over 500 GM ( Tonic Clonic), Is he being treated by an Epileptologist or general neuro? The Epileptologist makes a huge difference! Glad to meet others who share this commonality. 7 yrs for me. I had the surgery. Got my life back. Nice to meet all of you. TweetyRN
    Driver's licence. You have to report to the DMV that you had a seizure when you have a seizure.


    steph
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from HappyJaxRN
    Um...there's a law called the Good Samaritin Law. Can't spell it...you shouldn't loose your license unless you were WORKING in the capacity of a nurse...or medical personnel..say at like...a hospital or something. I believe responding to help someone and that person dying or becoming injured shouldn't be cause for you to loose your license...I guess unless it was gross negligence?? I don't know. I could be wrong here....What happened?
    I lost my driver's licence twice.


    steph
  3. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from FirstYear2005
    i'm just a student nurse, but can't one loose their license over something like this ??
    I was responding to the above question and assumed the poster meant losing your driver's licence.

    ok - hope that clears things up.

    steph
  4. by   tlhubbard
    Quote from Bipley
    The nostril trick doesn't stop a seizure, it just gets them breathing again. I've only used it a handful of times, usually breathing isn't an issue. But when it was I was pretty shocked at how well (and fast) it worked.
    My daughter had a seizure (1st one and she's 10), I of course forgot everything I was ever taught. She turned blue around the nose and mouth ( the seizure lasted at least 2 minutes, but she wasn't breathing for at least 1) My question is: her chin was down in her chest, I don't think I could have opened her airway. Is this a typical positioning of the head and neck during a seizure? She was lying in my waterbed, felt something coming that didn't seem right and was attempting to get up when it happened (that may have been partly responsible for the posturing).

    I certainly hope she doesn't EVER do this again. I have to say, when it's a stranger I do fine. With my own daughter, I panicked.
  5. by   DD-RN
    Tweety RN,

    My son is the one who has had over 500 GM seizures. He had 2 lobectomies (with 2 subdural grids surgeries) in the past 3 years (at 2 of the best hospitals in the U.S.). He is seen regularly (for the past 13 years) by our local epileptologist, who is fabulous. His seizures have been reduced from 10 per month to one per month (last lobectomy was 12 months ago). His medical care has been superb...the doctors say that he has a very difficult case.

    So have you been seizure-free since your surgery? Was yours temporal? My son's is frontal.

    Best of luck to you.
  6. by   tlhubbard
    I have another question. A friend of mine (adult female) had seizures, yet had an EEG come back normal (early on). Now they find that she has been having small seizures (absent), and she has had 3 grand mal, now they are seeing the small seizures with the EEG.

    My daughter had a normal EEG after her seizure earlier this month. She has another one scheduled for Feb to follow up. Any chance that it takes more than one EEG to catch these, especially if the patient is not able to fall asleep during the test?
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from tlhubbard
    I have another question. A friend of mine (adult female) had seizures, yet had an EEG come back normal (early on). Now they find that she has been having small seizures (absent), and she has had 3 grand mal, now they are seeing the small seizures with the EEG.

    My daughter had a normal EEG after her seizure earlier this month. She has another one scheduled for Feb to follow up. Any chance that it takes more than one EEG to catch these, especially if the patient is not able to fall asleep during the test?
    I've had 2 normal EEG's and 2 normal MRI's.

    My neuro and the ER doc both said that adult onset seizures rarely have a discernible cause. And 60% of the time you never have more than one. I had two 6 months apart so I went on medication and it has been almost 2 years.

    All the research I've read says the same thing about adults - no abnormal EEG's or MRI's.

    When it comes to kids though - I am not sure.

    steph
  8. by   DD-RN
    tlhubbard,

    My son had a few normal EEGs early on (after a few seizures). After that, his were all abnormal. An EEG is just a test to start with. Also, a normal EEG does not rule out epilepsy/seizure disorder (as in the case of your friend too). Just as as a person without seizures can have an abnormal EEG.

    If your daughter has only had one seizure, I would try and relax (as hard as that may be). Some people may have a one-time seizure and never have another. I hope that is the case with your daughter.
  9. by   Barinbass
    Many people have one seizure in their lifetime and never have another. For now, try not to be too alarmed, but I was approx 11 when I started having Simple Partials during the day. Most likely due to the beginnings of puberty and the hormonal changes. Estrogen lowers the seizure threshold. I would be observant for any unusual compaints or behaviors you notice. Most may be insignificant, but you may not see some seizures. The person can feel them usually. Deja Vu, Jamais Vu, epigastric rising (all Partial sz) are just three of those events that an observer probably will not notice. EEGs can easily be normal and the patient still have epilepsy since the scalp electrodes may not detect epileptogenic activity deep within the brain or if no discharges occur during the EEG. The entire picture is important. I think the EEG machines may be more sensitive now. Please select a place for care based on the quality of care produced rather than the terms usually used to bring in the customers; World Renown, First Class Research facility, etc. I can almost see the neon sign. lol One has nothing to do with the other when it gets down to it, and you want a good patient oriented Neuro Dept. or better yet, Comprehensive Epilepsy Center that does have a track record of successful treatment and satisfied 'customers'. They are not all the same, and I steer clear of those with the "neon signs". Trust me.
  10. by   NRSKarenRN
    getting back to the original question + remembering this is a cpr class:

    a irway
    b reathing
    c irculation

    before you start any rescue efforts, you must remember to check the victim for responsiveness. if there is no response due to seizure, immediately dial 9-1-1 and check the airway!

    #1 cause of obstructed airway is the tongue followed by food. turning seizing person on the side improves the chances of moving tongue away from blocking airway. i've done the nose pinch in the past too (while in sidelying posiition) and seen it help.
  11. by   Bipley
    Quote from HappyJaxRN
    I guess I'm a thrill seeker too...really should work in the ER. I'm always jumping in...getting my hands dirty and well, yes...sometimes regretting that I jumped in. I'm getting a little better tho...

    I do that too...most of the time, keep driving and call 911, especially if I see that others have stopped to help. No need to have one more hazard at the scene...meaning another parked car on the side of the road. If something happens that I witness, I've always stopped to render help. I was late one day in nursing school when an elderly couple slammed into a telephone poll...I stayed with them until the ambulance arrived. Turned out to be the grandparents of one of my fellow students. Small world.
    Small world... very true. I went home to Iowa to visit my Dad a few years ago and stopped to help a stranded elderly couple. The man wouldn't leave his car unattended but requested that I take his wife (verrry old) to their son's home. Clearly, I agreed to at least get his wife to a safer area. Iowa mentality, gotta love it!!!!!

    As I followed her instructions, turn right here, left there... we ended up at the home of a couple I used to babysit for as a teen. I walked her to the door and there stands the man that used to overpay me every single time I would babysit. It was a nice, yet quick... reunion. I explained that his father was still with the car. He raced to take care of his Dad.

    Point being, small world... yes, it is.
  12. by   Bipley
    Quote from nrskarenrn
    i've done the nose pinch in the past too (while in sidelying posiition) and seen it help.
    you really have no clue how thrilled i am to see your post. you are the first person i have ever met that has heard of this!

    thanks for posting your experiences!
  13. by   msurgery1
    My sister had a seizure when we were in Prague on vacation. We were sitting outside at a cafe. She had complained that her tongue was "twitching". She suddenly stood up and pointed to her mouth then fell to the ground and turned blue. She was taken to a hospital via EMS. She is 29 years old and has never had a seizure before. Hopefully, this was an isolated incident. It scared the **** out of me and my family. The language barrier certainly was a challenge throughout the experience....and touring the hospital was an unexpected part of the trip.

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