Person who has a seizure - page 3

I'm curious as to how you would answer this. I was in disagreement with The Red Cross when they taught this. I really had no business taking a CPR course from them since I was a nurse and my... Read More

  1. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from stevielynn
    Woot! We agree on something . . and we share a disorder.

    steph
    I haven't suffered a grand mal in 15 years, knock wood.

    Grannynurse
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from grannynurse FNP student
    I haven't suffered a grand mal in 15 years, knock wood.

    Grannynurse
    It will be two years on New Year's Day 2006. Knock wood.

    steph
  3. by   ShannonSRN
    Hey to Steph and Grannynurse,

    I too share your disorder, and agree, if it's me...call 911! But did your neurologists give you Diastat (Valium in gel form) to carry with you? My last seizure was in June, so I now carry around pr Valium.

    So to all out there, if you encounter a patient in a mall, having a grand mal seizure...have someone call 911, place in a side-lying position, protect from injury, time the seizure, and then ask the family member (if available) if they have their Diastat available. The family member can administer it, and has probably been instructed to do so in case of seizure.
  4. by   palesarah
    Quote from stevielynn
    It will be two years on New Year's Day 2006. Knock wood.

    steph
    I too, have a historyof grand mal seizures, and (keep knocking!) it will be 12 years in February, for me. Still on daily meds though and my EEGs are such that my neurologist feels I can't come off them yet
  5. by   paramedicbay
    I'm a medic. If you see someone having a seizure SOMEONE needs to call 911.Place them in the RT lateral position and protect them from injury. Never stick anything in their mouth. CPR? I thought this was a seizure? lol. Moniter their duration, get any med HX if available and it would even be nice to have someone cover them around their waist/buttocks to give them privacy from any "accidents" In my exp most of the time the PT. goes through their seiz,wets/defacates...we arrive and find them postictal and transport.We get an IV/o2/moniter going. Most of the time its due to an adjustment needed in their medication. However, when someone seizes they may become hypoxic and if their med HX is unknown they need to be evaluated regardless. I picked up a 42 y/o male who never had a seizure in his life. The family was going crazy they were so scared. It turned out he had a brain tumor.
  6. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from ShannonSRN
    Hey to Steph and Grannynurse,

    I too share your disorder, and agree, if it's me...call 911! But did your neurologists give you Diastat (Valium in gel form) to carry with you? My last seizure was in June, so I now carry around pr Valium.

    So to all out there, if you encounter a patient in a mall, having a grand mal seizure...have someone call 911, place in a side-lying position, protect from injury, time the seizure, and then ask the family member (if available) if they have their Diastat available. The family member can administer it, and has probably been instructed to do so in case of seizure.
    No, my neurologist has not.

    Grannynurse
  7. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from paramedicbay
    I'm a medic. If you see someone having a seizure SOMEONE needs to call 911.Place them in the RT lateral position and protect them from injury. Never stick anything in their mouth. CPR? I thought this was a seizure? lol. Moniter their duration, get any med HX if available and it would even be nice to have someone cover them around their waist/buttocks to give them privacy from any "accidents" In my exp most of the time the PT. goes through their seiz,wets/defacates...we arrive and find them postictal and transport.We get an IV/o2/moniter going. Most of the time its due to an adjustment needed in their medication. However, when someone seizes they may become hypoxic and if their med HX is unknown they need to be evaluated regardless. I picked up a 42 y/o male who never had a seizure in his life. The family was going crazy they were so scared. It turned out he had a brain tumor.
    Hi, I have always called 911 when I encounter someone with a medical emergency. And I hope that someone does the same for me. You are correct in your instructions. I have never seen anyone arrest from experiencing a grand mal. I'm not saying it is impossible but I've never seen it.

    Grannynurse
  8. by   HappyJaxRN
    Quote from Arizona Mark
    First, place the man in a side-lying position. Cradle his head so he doesn't bang it against the floor. Then you, or someone nearby time the duration of his seizure. If it lasts for more than 3 minutes, yes call 911. Less than 3 minutes is considered not significant for persons prone to seizures.
    I take care of seizure-prone individuals, and these are the baseline parameters we go by to determine whether or not to call 911.
    I could imagine the seizure times may vary according to policy.............
    Mark
    Okay....That's exactly what the RED CROSS said to do too....if less than 3 minutes, don't call 9-1-1. But that's all the instructor said....not if the person is epilectic...would have helped some....I think the class was taught too fast and a lot of details were left out. Thanks.
    Last edit by HappyJaxRN on Nov 29, '05
  9. by   HappyJaxRN
    Quote from Simba&NalasMom
    I think it would always be appropriate to call 911 if it was a person you didn't know from Adam, regardless of the duration of the seizure...after all, you don't know if the person is a "seasoned" seizure victim or if it's the first time he'd had one. However, your question was whether to call 911 AFTER aid was rendered, correct? Hmmm...

    Personally, I would have another party call 911 and then place/try to hold the victim in rescue position until the medics arrived.

    What was the RC instructor's take on the question?
    That was exactly what I thought when I was taking the CPR class...who knows who this person is...call anyway...I'm not versed on seizures and as a nurse have only seen one or two of them in a hospital setting...I know what first aid to render, but out in the public, I would feel not-so-comfy...NOT calling 9-1-1.
  10. by   10ACGIRL
    Quote from Arizona Mark
    First, place the man in a side-lying position. Cradle his head so he doesn't bang it against the floor. Then you, or someone nearby time the duration of his seizure. If it lasts for more than 3 minutes, yes call 911. Less than 3 minutes is considered not significant for persons prone to seizures.
    I take care of seizure-prone individuals, and these are the baseline parameters we go by to determine whether or not to call 911.
    I could imagine the seizure times may vary according to policy.............
    Mark
    Iwas about to say the same thing but, you beat me to it. I should know because I've suffered from seizures. My first episode happened when I was 3 & 1/2.
  11. by   Male_UT_RN
    I agree with the Red Cross instructor for the reason, that if the person is epileptic and the seizure is less then 3 minutes and if they refuse the care from the paramedics. You most likely tied up a resource to answer call and then not be needed, not to mention the person may have gotten embarassed with all the attention that was brought to them. Besides who is going to pay for the gas that the paramedics used to get there and then just return back.
    As a person with a seizure disorder I know from first hand expirence I would not want attention drawn to me or my seizure. Besides I would feel bad tying up a resource when I am going to have a family member or friend take me to the ED. Besides I usually get combative in the postictial state and am more willing to listen to family and or friends then the paramedics, and the that thing I would want to do is give the medics a hard time, since they have my respect.
    But I do understand that if there is an certain amount of not knowing, and in that case I would say go with your gut instincts and get someone to call 911. What is it really going to hurt?
  12. by   HappyJaxRN
    Quote from Male_UT_RN
    I agree with the Red Cross instructor for the reason, that if the person is epileptic and the seizure is less then 3 minutes and if they refuse the care from the paramedics. You most likely tied up a resource to answer call and then not be needed, not to mention the person may have gotten embarassed with all the attention that was brought to them. Besides who is going to pay for the gas that the paramedics used to get there and then just return back.
    As a person with a seizure disorder I know from first hand expirence I would not want attention drawn to me or my seizure. Besides I would feel bad tying up a resource when I am going to have a family member or friend take me to the ED. Besides I usually get combative in the postictial state and am more willing to listen to family and or friends then the paramedics, and the that thing I would want to do is give the medics a hard time, since they have my respect.
    But I do understand that if there is an certain amount of not knowing, and in that case I would say go with your gut instincts and get someone to call 911. What is it really going to hurt?
    I could 'what if' this scenerio all day. I just feel...that...if I was called to come and help someone...and I didn't see the initial seizure, how do I know it's gone on longer or shorter than 3 minutes? Plus, who's to say that this person didn't have a seizure prior to my arriving there? I don't know...what if...what if...what if....I know someone who died of a grand mal seizure...it scares me to think of someone having a grand mal in front of me...and I don't call for 911. CYA? Lol...I understand what you're saying...I'd still call tho. Poo on me. Oh well....I would hate to respond, I don't call 911, I walk away....everyone knowing I'm medically trained and then something happens...great....
  13. by   10ACGIRL
    Quote from stevielynn
    Woot! We agree on something . . and we share a disorder.

    steph
    I would have never guess that you might suffer the same! Well, it IS nice to know that you are not alone in tjis big epileptic world! I just had a light seizure a few days b4 we left for going up to Ohio to get hubby's mom and bring her down to her winter home in Largo, Florida

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