Permanent 12 Hour Nights??... and LPN vs. RN

  1. well JMP,
    I'd like to let you know that you will learn while you work. as a student, you are only getting your feet wet-once your on the floor the real learning begins-don't ever think that you have to stay in school for the rest of your life, it's a whole different ballpark in the real world...
    I commend you wanting to get your BSN. I too am a recent grad. but have been working in the field for over 7 years.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   purplemania
    I work 12 hr nights only. it would be hard for me to alternate days/nights as that disrupts your sleeping so much. However, you will be able to test the waters yourself and if you don't adjust then request transfer, or get another job. One thing good about nursing is that you are not married to one position.
  4. by   theboss
    CONGRADULATIONS ON YOUR SCHOOLING ! I HOPE TO DO THE SAME IN THE FUTURE.
    STARTING OUT IN NURSING I ALWAYS WORKED DAYS.
    THEN I GOT MY JOB IN THE ER AND I NOW WORK 12 HOUR SHIFTS FROM 6P TO 6A..I CHOSE THESE HOURS BECAUSE I HAVE 3 CHILDREN AT HOME AND WANTED TO BE THERE IN THE MORNINGS AND WHEN THEY GOT HOME FROM SCHOOL AND STILL BE ABLE TO MAKE DINNER..IT TOOK ABOUT 3 MONTHS TO GET USED TO IT ...AT ONE POINT WE WERE SHORT HANDED AND I WORKED NOON TO MIDNIGHT OH WHAT A B..... I WAS .OUR ER DIRECTOR SAYS WORKING BOTH SHIFTS WILL TAKE 10 YEARS OFF YOUR LIFE.. NOT TO BE NEG. JUST MY EXPERIENCE WITH THE SUBJECT I DO HOPE IT WORKS FOR YOU AND IF NOT LIKE IT WAS SAID YOU ARENT MARRIED TO THE POSITION...GOOD LUCK!!!!AS YOU GET YOUR FEET WET THE REST WILL COME IN TIME, WE NEVER STOP LEARNING BECAUSE THERE IS ALWAYS SOMEONE OR SOMETHING THAT WILL TEACH YOU MORE!!!
  5. by   mustangsheba
    JMP: When I was a graduate nurse, I took a night position because I wanted to get a foot in the door, and it's good to know how nights work so you can make it easier on them. For instance, when I got on days,I made sure to come in a little early because I could really empathize with not having to stay a minute overtime at 7a. I told my employer from the get go that I was interested in getting the first available day position because I always get sick when I work nights. Through the years, I have found my best shift is evenings. You will find what works best for you. Keep in mind what Janeen said.
  6. by   ClariceS
    Part of the reason I stayed at my hospital was that they offered permanent shifts. Rotating from shift to shift can be very difficult on sleep (then on health). And don't worry about learning stuff on nights if you are on a med-surg floor -- you'll learn tons. If you are in a teaching facility, things definitely happen on a 24 hour basis with things only slowing a little after the sun sets.
    Congrats and best of luck on your career!
  7. by   Q.
    JMP-
    I really don't think there is much debate about who is a better nurse...we all agree that more education is better. I think the argument stems from not knowing each other's roles: LPNs feel put down by RNs, but feel just as if not MORE SO valuable than some RNs, and RNs feel LPNs as an added responsibility, and may even feel threatened in that the LPN may take away all the bedside care and the RN is left to do assessments, orders, and check charting. There are alot of jobs in clinics that I would LOVE to have, but the office would rather hire an LPN. Could be money, who knows? There has always been a discussion about the so ******* many tracks for nurses, and the lack of higher pay for higher educated nurses. I think one thing this country needs is one, consistent method of training and licensing.
  8. by   JMP
    I am about to graduate- and have had many job offers- however...I finally made the big decision and went with a position that offered rotating 12 and 8 hour shifts- both days AND nights.
    This position won out over other, slightly better positions, because the other positions required me to work full time PERMANENT NIGHTS- which as a new grad I questioned the quality of the experience- never being on day shifts.
    The job I turned down was in an area I was interested in...with good benefits..ect. in a nice location...but I could not come to terms with always working nights.

    Anyone have any insights in this regard?

    By the way......I have been reading several posts that have pitted LPN/RPN vs. RN vs. BSN.etc...and as a former RPN who is now almost a RN and has already applied for my BScN all I can say with confidence is- education is a good thing- the more we know the better nurses we can become.
    I now realize how much I thought I knew as a RPN and really had no idea- the more I learn the more I realize I HAVE to learn.

    JMP

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