Past history about care on a Saturday

  1. My uncle was born on a Saturday, 1923, at Loma Linda hospital. My grandmother told me that she shouted for help in urgent need of attention from medical staff. None came. After hours in hard labor, he was born. Lack of oxygen to his brain because of the protracted labor. He was left with a mentality of a 3 year old. He died at the age of 60. My father, his older brother, was a doctor, and always carried deep resentment for a religion whose restrictions would cause nurses and doctors to ignore the cries of a patient's pain and panic. I would hope that some of their restrictions with regard to patient care have changed, but from what I have read, they haven't changed very much. Doesn't make sense for me that anyone with restrictions like that would choose any profession that might present a need to work on a Saturday.
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    About Kathleen Robledo

    Joined: Mar '18; Posts: 4; Likes: 1
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    33 Comments

  3. by   not.done.yet
    I am confused. What does religion have to do with this and how is it pertinent now, when it happened in 1923? What "restrictions to patient care" are you referring to?
  4. by   Kathleen Robledo
    Restrictions to patient care. NOT WORKING ON SATURDAY. And religious restrictions but 7th daters continue today, in 2018. Unless you are conveniently calling your beliefs something else it has to do with religion. Agonized cries for help when none comes was and still is, inexcusable.
  5. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Kathleen Robledo
    Restrictions to patient care. NOT WORKING ON SATURDAY. And religious restrictions but 7th daters continue today, in 2018. Unless you are conveniently calling your beliefs something else it has to do with religion. Agonized cries for help when none comes was and still is, inexcusable.
    Ummmm. Pretty sure that isn't happening anymore, even at SDA hospitals.
  6. by   verene
    It has been 95 years since your uncle was born. I think at this point it is extremely unlikely you will ever find the specific reasons why hospital staff didn't come when called. Maybe the floor was understaffed and dealing with another emergency? Maybe your family in their distress felt like it took forever to get help and that is the story that has been passed down regardless of how much time actually did or did not pass? Maybe something else? I find it difficult to believe that a hospital would have NO medical staff whatsoever (regardless of day of week) and thus not respond for a full day.

    Many, many hospitals are run by different religious orders with different sabboth days. All of them are staffed on sabboth days to provide medical care to those in need. Caring for the ill and injured is seen as an exception to "no work" sabboth restrictions in those faiths who believe in having a day of rest. Furthermore many employees of these religious affiliated hospitals do not share the same faith basis, and thus may have no qualms about working on a day of rest.
  7. by   Kathleen Robledo
    From what I have read on the comments page, SDA people are still asking for special dispensation so they don't work on Saturdays. So it is still going on. So.......my opinion and the facts still stand. God and his/her decisions are still much bigger than a puny bunch of "traditional activities". (Aka religious restrictions).
  8. by   Kathleen Robledo
    I listened to my grandmother tell me about that day. Doubt you might, but it happened. She said that they were on campus, but not responding. Probably doing their worship. It may have been 90 years, but it was 60 years of dealing with the tragedy, providing care, and whatching what could have been a productive life, being basically thrown away. Look up your history of treatment. Don't continue to keep your head in the sand. So some nurses and doctors didn't go to Hell, while my grandmother and father entered their own special hell that day and days to come. Your god is an unjust god, if one believes as the SDAs do.
  9. by   sevensonnets
    I haven't a clue what a 7th dater is. I've worked 32 years in a Catholic hospital, and have worked many many Sabbaths in 39 years of nursing and haven't ever heard the term. None of us here were alive in 1923. Perhaps you should simply give it a rest and move on.
  10. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Kathleen Robledo
    From what I have read on the comments page, SDA people are still asking for special dispensation so they don't work on Saturdays. So it is still going on. So.......my opinion and the facts still stand. God and his/her decisions are still much bigger than a puny bunch of "traditional activities". (Aka religious restrictions).
    Oh for heaven's sake. SDA's aren't the only ones who have religious requirements. And so what if they do? It's a free country. If a fair and equitable solution can be had how does that affect you? Trust me, no hospitable is going to go out of their way to meet these requests. What happened to your great uncle 95 years ago does not happen in this day and age and so isn't at all pertinent. What is your agenda?And as we all know, everyone has an opinion...
  11. by   not.done.yet
    This is just making no sense at all. What is a 7th dater or an SDA? Seventh Day Adventist I guess? You do realize that hospitals cannot discriminate hiring based on religion...meaning....no hospital is hiring ONLY one certain religion and then "shutting down" on Saturdays. What a silly notion.

    I wish you peace. There are bigger issues in our country right now than someone not answering a call light in 1923. Perhaps invest your energy in something pertinent.
  12. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Kathleen Robledo
    My uncle was born on a Saturday, 1923, at Loma Linda hospital. My grandmother told me that she shouted for help in urgent need of attention from medical staff. None came. After hours in hard labor, he was born. Lack of oxygen to his brain because of the protracted labor. He was left with a mentality of a 3 year old. He died at the age of 60. My father, his older brother, was a doctor, and always carried deep resentment for a religion whose restrictions would cause nurses and doctors to ignore the cries of a patient's pain and panic. I would hope that some of their restrictions with regard to patient care have changed, but from what I have read, they haven't changed very much. Doesn't make sense for me that anyone with restrictions like that would choose any profession that might present a need to work on a Saturday.
    Are you a nurse? I'm very confused about the "point" of this post. What are you hoping to accomplish?
  13. by   verene
    Quote from Kathleen Robledo
    I listened to my grandmother tell me about that day. Doubt you might, but it happened. She said that they were on campus, but not responding. Probably doing their worship. It may have been 90 years, but it was 60 years of dealing with the tragedy, providing care, and whatching what could have been a productive life, being basically thrown away. Look up your history of treatment. Don't continue to keep your head in the sand. So some nurses and doctors didn't go to Hell, while my grandmother and father entered their own special hell that day and days to come. Your god is an unjust god, if one believes as the SDAs do.
    I have no doubt your grandmother felt distressed and highly abandoned by the staff that day. However emotion also clouds memory and distress alters perception. All I ask you to consider is that your grandmother's truth and experience of that day may not match "the facts" that an objective non-involved observer of that day would find.

    As you state, it has been over 90 years. It is clear you and your family have suffered with this for a long time. But I truly wonder what it is you seek now? None of us were there 95 years ago. And medical care has change substantially in many, many different ways since that time. None of us can say if the care your grandmother and uncle recieve were typical and standard of the time, or if more happened. We simply do not have the factual information to go back and conduct a systems analysis of the event.

    As myself and many others have pointed out, many hospitals are run by religious organizations (for reference 63% of hospital based care in my state is from an religious organization), this does not mean that the hospitals complete shut down for religious services. Hospitals are a 24/7 operation and provide care continuously.

    The degree of suffering and anger you are feeling over this event, one which occurred before you were born, seems misplaced. Is there something else going on in your life now that has re-awoken this old family hurt? Have you had a more recent run-in with a SDA organization that has left you feeling unheard? What is it you are needing that is leading you to post this story online for us now? There is nothing constructive any of us can do to address what happened nearly a hundred years ago. However if you share your need, what it is you hope to accomplish or what it is you are looking for, perhaps that can be met.
  14. by   Flatline
    I have worked at Loma Linda several times in the past few years (not as a Loma Linda employee) on the ground floor and with the leadership and can tell you that I am 100% confident that things have changed since 1923.

    They do have some restrictions still though such as no caffeine (nurses can bring they own) and nothing beyond medical care on Saturdays (no meetings/training etc).

    Pretty typical hospital IMO.

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