Part time

  1. 0
    I'm in a non traditional student a permanent partial disability. I'm worried about telling my instructors that I need part time clinical hours. I feel like if I tell them now they will hold it against me all the rest of the way through school. It does not affect my ability to lift. Is there a job out there for a 2 year RN out of school? How does one get into cardiovascular research?
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  3. 22 Comments so far...

  4. 15
    Clinical hours are usually no more than a shift (12 or 8 hours) twice a week, maybe even less. My question is, if you are unable to withstand a full clinical week, how limited are your work hours going to be once you become a nurse?

    I think you need to think past cutting clinical hours and consider more your ability to find a job that suits your needs once you graduate. Desk jobs are available for nurses, but as with all nursing jobs, they are not easy to come by, and many require traditional nursing experience.

    I'm not sure why you would choose to go into such a physically demanding profession if you already know your job choices are quite limited.

    This might sound "mean" to some--like I'm stomping on your decision to become a nurse--but I just want you to think it through before you invest two years of your life and a significant monetary investment in a profession that you may not be able to do.
  5. 8
    Schools require a certain number of clinical hours to graduate. I am not sure how part time will figure into the equation. At a minimum it will delay your ability to graduate but it may not be considered a reasonable accommodation given the way the program is set up. You will absolutely have to disclose your disability and requirements before starting the program.

    In terms of research nursing, generally you will need several years of acute care nursing experience in a hospital. If you can only work part time the number of years you will need of that will double. Whether you can get an acute care job as a two year RN depends largely on where you live. In many parts of the country BSN is now the gold standard for acute care.

    i too am wondering if nursing is a reasonable choice for your situation. There are other, less physically demanding, jobs in healthcare.
  6. 5
    The school does not have the discretion to decrease clinical hours for students-- if you want to graduate, you need to perform a certain number of clinical hours as part of your education to satisfy the Board of Nursing that you have had an accredited education.

    Did you not know this when you applied to nursing school? With so many new grads out of work, do you think it will be easy (or even feasible) to find a job as a grad when you cannot fulfill the bona fide requirements of the position?

    As to getting into CV research, if you mean to do it as an RN, you would need at a minimum some years of solid experience in some aspect of CV nursing -- CCU, cardiac/vascular surgery, CV rehab, general cardiology, or some such. You won't find a new grad job with limited shift hours there. And researchers will likely prefer a BSN or even MN.

    Maybe something else would be better, or you can rethink your disability to see if your limits can be stretched. Even with a diagnosis of PPD, you can improve. I have had people call up the insurance company years later and tell them to stop sending the checks, because they got better. Obviously I have no idea what your disability is, other than the fact that it doesn't affect your ability to lift, but see if you and your physician (or another physician) can work on that.
    imintrouble, llg, TheCommuter, and 2 others like this.
  7. 2
    Have you asked how much you'll be in clinical to begin with? When I was in school, the most we did was 6-8 hours twice a week; we were never on the floor for 8 hours though, b/c that time included pre- and post-conference. Internship required a set number of hours in a set period of time; we had to work whenever our preceptor did, including 12 hour shifts, nights, weekends. But it was a very limited amount of time...I want to say four or six weeks? It was the final part of the final semester.

    I would just talk to your school's disability center and your program's PTB, and ask what kind of reasonable accommodations can be made. But through the vast majority of your program, clinical hours ARE part-time, and like PP said you have to do all of the hours.

    There are jobs available for ADN's. The prevalence, setting, and candidate pool varies by location.

    As for research positions, I'm guessing you might need a MSN, although I could be wrong about that. For sure you'd need a BSN at minimum. And as far as I know, all nontraditional nursing work requires prior bedside experience.
    poppycat and GrnTea like this.
  8. 0
    Thanks for the advice! I've had myself, mainly, telling me about what I can't do for many years already. No more, though. I know there's a place for me. I am excited about healthcare and the biology of healthcare and through a lot of vet clinic experience I know that iam very good at it.
  9. 4
    Quote from Room4me
    Thanks for the advice! I've had myself, mainly, telling me about what I can't do for many years already. No more, though. I know there's a place for me. I am excited about healthcare and the biology of healthcare and through a lot of vet clinic experience I know that iam very good at it.
    Yes, well....as a disabled nurse myself...you need to realize that nursing is a tough physical job. Research jobs aren't in abundance. For a RN it will require a BSN or MSN preferred.

    While your experience in a vet clinic is admirable it has little to do with human medicine. Why not consider vet tech? since you already have an affinity.

    There is no nursing shortage. Hospitals are beginning to hire only BSN grads. Research will be even more selective and require some experience.

    What is your disability? The school may accommodate you but the hospital may not. You still need to meet them minimal requirements and then they may decide IF they can accommodate you. The ADA states that the accommodation may not cause "undue hardship" on the employer.

    I have not found the profession very accommodating.
    imintrouble, llg, workingmama77, and 1 other like this.
  10. 1
    Home health and/or PDN may be an option for you. Some of my cases, I am lifting my patients and others there is no lifting at all. Most require 1 year experience before they hire you though.

    Like others have said, I don't think asking for part time hours is going to work, but you def. should talk to your instructors about options.
    Room4me likes this.
  11. 1
    From personal experience:

    - get your doctor's note with your DS and clearly stated limits of what you can and can't do.
    - with it, go to the Dean's office or to the highest administrator in school you can reach. Try to do it before start of the semester. Explain your situation and ask for personalysed plan or other reasonable accomodations. Formally, what you're doing is covered by ADA and school should at least attempt to accomodate you. Be ready to have your education time stretched to get your "X" hours to graduate.
    - it should not be your job to tell your clinical instructor about your needs. You may, tbough, be asked to work additional days to compensate for the missed time, and you may have to pay for this. In my place it was 35 bucks/hour.
    - use the above point to your advantage. Every hospital has desk jobs for nurses, and they can be suitable for a new grad. You have to market yourself really hard for that and become really well-known in local people network.
    - if you got time, money and/ or some additional marketable skills, use them. If you find a job, description of which suits you well, do whatever it takes to get into that profession's universe.
    In my now former place, I knew several students (not counting myself) who needed temporary or permanent "special accomodations". Every one of them made it through the school, and every one is working now. I couldn't do some home care visits, so i did part of the clinicals in LTC and had no problems. And a guy who basically couldn't move anything over 10 lbs. is grabbing 200% of typical new grad salary by utilizing his BSN and previous IT degree byd doing EMR developing.
    Room4me likes this.
  12. 1
    Quote from Esme12
    Yes, well....as a disabled nurse myself...you need to realize that nursing is a tough physical job. Research jobs aren't in abundance. For a RN it will require a BSN or MSN preferred.

    While your experience in a vet clinic is admirable it has little to do with human medicine. Why not consider vet tech? since you already have an affinity.

    There is no nursing shortage. Hospitals are beginning to hire only BSN grads. Research will be even more selective and require some experience.

    What is your disability? The school may accommodate you but the hospital may not. You still need to meet them minimal requirements and then they may decide IF they can accommodate you. The ADA states that the accommodation may not cause "undue hardship" on the employer.

    I have not found the profession very accommodating.

    Well, nursing is in fact more "accomodating" than, for example, many areas of human medicine. Problem is in finding the precise place, but after that "there is the will, there is a way".

    One of the most amazing nurses I've met is a local cancer center case manager who is legally blind. She never did anything administrative before being diagnosed and given bad prognosis, and never worked in onco as well. She managed to get super-speedy MSN right before losing her sight. She is the patients' favorite, as they think that she doesn't see what their bodies became after cancer treatment, she is respected and successful and makes money. Sure there are not many more like her, but how many professions will accomodate a person with such a severe disability?
    Room4me likes this.


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