Paid for precepting? - page 2

I would first like to say "hello" to everyone here at allnurses!!! I am excited to be a new member! So, my first question on this site to everyone is "Do you get paid to precept new grads?" Many... Read More

  1. by   fronkey bean
    Quote from elthia
    I work at a teaching hospital, and I don't get paid to precept. However, I get volunteered to precept quite a bit. Usually I don't mind, but during the last 2 weeks of orientation it's a pain, because that's the GN's 4-5 pt's and my 3-6 pt's to assess, MARS to check, assessments to chart or audit, 24 hour checks to do or audit, questions to answer, and with the last person I precepted, I didn't trust that GN one bit. I made darn sure I audited everything. That was one GN who scared me, BAD.
    Did I count that right? The GN has up to 5 pt.'s and you have up to 6? that's 11 pt.'s w/ a new grad to follow behind? That is just unsafe. And I don't care if it is a teaching hosp. or if you haven't taken a class. If you are asked to do extra duties you should be compensated and I would refuse to do it if I weren't.
  2. by   elthia
    Quote from fronkey bean
    Did I count that right? The GN has up to 5 pt.'s and you have up to 6? that's 11 pt.'s w/ a new grad to follow behind? That is just unsafe. And I don't care if it is a teaching hosp. or if you haven't taken a class. If you are asked to do extra duties you should be compensated and I would refuse to do it if I weren't.
    Yeah well, that's what happens on night shift.
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    The only issue I have with precepting is that LPNs are not paid to do it at all. If I have to take the time to precept a new grad or new LPN, I believe that I deserve the pay as well, and more than three dollars a day. In fact, they pay RNs the same three dollars to be charge nurse for the day. I do take the time to teach (unless the nurse is a pain in the rear), because I do understand how it is to be new. Even a seasoned nurse is 'new' to the facility, to a floor that they floated to, or to equipment. And, I see it this way; you never know when you may need someone. But, because I am not getting paid, if the new LPN (or even RN...yes, I have had to orient them as well sometimes) is arrogrant or a know it all, I gracefully find an excuse to shift them to someone else.
  4. by   nyapa
    Nobody is paid to precept here. As an EN (LPN) I have precepted a new grad EN, so I know now what it is like for the RN's when they have to precept me as a new grad RN. I think they should be paid for it.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from dar15
    Nobody is paid to precept here. As an EN (LPN) I have precepted a new grad EN, so I know now what it is like for the RN's when they have to precept me as a new grad RN. I think they should be paid for it.
    What does "EN" stand for?
  6. by   Nursebarebari
    If your job description does not include precepting, then you have the right to refuse. What does your union contract says, check it out and follow the rules.
    My job pays you 1hr of your base pay, I think it is $34 or so for a day.
  7. by   Zookeeper3
    First, we both offer precepting classes and pay the preceptors, after they've completed the class. What is happening is that we're short staffed, no kidding, and the staff that needs the classes really CAN'T go. BUT, those non "trained" experiences nurses are just assigned everything from school students, to critical care students and NOT getting paid. So I see your beef, completely.

    If you are interested, seek out your educator and have her assign you the class so it WILL happen, if you are not interested in teaching, and thats OK too, just tell he, or your charge, NM.. that you are not YET interested but will consider in the future with PROPER training.

    We have trained preceptors who are simply exhausted from day to day teaching that they "refuse" to get a break, that's AOK. You need to WANT to teach to be effective, stress this point with management to either get into the class or aleiviate yourself from the headache.

    Know that teaching may elevate your year end pay too, check out how you bonus or get raises, this might help you at years end, don't discount that.
  8. by   bigsyis
    I was never paid for precepting anyone, and did it many times, in several institutions. Bummer!
  9. by   nyapa
    error
    Last edit by nyapa on Sep 21, '07
  10. by   nyapa
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    What does "EN" stand for?
    An EN is an Enrolled Nurse. They (its still hard to not say 'we' as I was one for many years) have their own patients; assess, plan, implement and record all care for them; and are involved from admission to discharge. The scope of practice varies from state to state, and from facility to facility. Most ENs these days can give medications, though I think not IV directly (I was allowed to commence IV crystalloid fluids though). ENs can do venipuncture and cannulate in some institutions. I think in some states they can have senior positions in some aged care facilities, but don't quote me on that. In my state ENs work "under the indirect supervision of a Registered Nurse"; but that indirect supervision can be the charge nurse - its a pretty broad comment. Hope that helps. Check out the ANMC page which lists the Australian competencies if you are really interested, but it is really long winded
    http://www.anmc.org.au/docs/Publicat...dards%20EN.pdf
  11. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from dar15
    An EN is an Enrolled Nurse. They (its still hard to not say 'we' as I was one for many years) have their own patients; assess, plan, implement and record all care for them; and are involved from admission to discharge. The scope of practice varies from state to state, and from facility to facility. Most ENs these days can give medications, though I think not IV directly (I was allowed to commence IV crystalloid fluids though). ENs can do venipuncture and cannulate in some institutions. I think in some states they can have senior positions in some aged care facilities, but don't quote me on that. In my state ENs work "under the indirect supervision of a Registered Nurse"; but that indirect supervision can be the charge nurse - its a pretty broad comment. Hope that helps. Check out the ANMC page which lists the Australian competencies if you are really interested, but it is really long winded
    http://www.anmc.org.au/docs/Publicat...dards%20EN.pdf
    Thanks for the clarification. It sounds exciting!
  12. by   pagandeva2000
    I do think that the preceptor has to be interested in doing the training, otherwise it is a bust for the new nurse as well as administration. I can see the challenges involved, though that can really be aggreviating, such as a know it all new grad, or a scary cat who doesn't want to do anything. I wish I had a regular preceptor, though, because I didn't learn much when I did my six week med-surg stint. I ran from there to the clinic I now work for and didn't get the nerve to try and return to it per diem until a few weeks ago.
  13. by   RNview
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I do think that the preceptor has to be interested in doing the training, otherwise it is a bust for the new nurse as well as administration. I can see the challenges involved, though that can really be aggreviating, such as a know it all new grad, or a scary cat who doesn't want to do anything. I wish I had a regular preceptor, though, because I didn't learn much when I did my six week med-surg stint. I ran from there to the clinic I now work for and didn't get the nerve to try and return to it per diem until a few weeks ago.
    I totally agree with you with every thing you said!

    I was one of those lucky ones who had only one preceptor and it made a huge difference. One of my friends who started at the same time had 4 different preceptors and she was totally lost. She missed a lot. It was very stressful for her and she left after 8 months.

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