PA School

  1. I was talking to a very good friend of mine tonight, who happened to discuss with me some of the joys of PA school... one of them being NOT to touch patients or participate in ANY type of hands-on care... In her class, students are actually BELITTLED for assisting patients to bathroom, getting bedpan, etc. My response was "huh?" I just cannot believe it...
    •  
  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   Alpha13
    Well believe it. Some people want to help others without getting arm deep in bodily fluids. My cousin is like that and going for radiologist. I know him and don't think of myself as any better than him for not minding the dirty work.
  4. by   EmmaG
    Quote from JustaGypsy
    I was talking to a very good friend of mine tonight, who happened to discuss with me some of the joys of PA school... one of them being NOT to touch patients or participate in ANY type of hands-on care... In her class, students are actually BELITTLED for assisting patients to bathroom, getting bedpan, etc. My response was "huh?" I just cannot believe it...
    'Belittling' is a bit much, but hands-on care as you describe is not the job of a PA.
  5. by   futurecnm
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    'Belittling' is a bit much, but hands-on care as you describe is not the job of a PA.
    I agree, it just isn't really in the scope of a MD or PA. I don't think that it isn't that they don't want to help it just isn't done. They probably also aren't really trained on how to do these things and would feel uncomfortable trying to do some of the basic care activities. In general, it is a RN or NA job to do these types of things. Maybe I'm weird but I would think it would be kind of strange to walk in and see a PA helping a patient on a bedpan.
  6. by   CritterLover
    Quote from futurecnm
    i agree, it just isn't really in the scope of a md or pa. i don't think that it isn't that they don't want to help it just isn't done. they probably also aren't really trained on how to do these things and would feel uncomfortable trying to do some of the basic care activities. in general, it is a rn or na job to do these types of things. maybe i'm weird but i would think it would be kind of strange to walk in and see a pa helping a patient on a bedpan.

    i wouldn't want the pa or md to put the pt on the bedpan ... unless they were up for changing the bed afterward,too

    i don't say that to be mean or condescending, but lets face it: there is a certain "art" to bedpan use, and you can make quite the mess if you don't do it right.

    this is true for other direct-care activities, too. getting the s/p thr out of bed, squeezing a walker into the bathroom.....

    they are welcome to refill the water pitcher, or set up the meal tray (won't likely happen, but they are welcome to do it )

    anything that could make a mess that i'll need to clean up (or write an incident report over, like a fall) -- please, call for the nurse or cna!
  7. by   Tweety
    Well, I don't see the NP's around here doing hands on basic care either.

    It's not their job.
  8. by   MAISY, RN-ER
    Yikes...I am not sure I'd want a PA or NP that had no hands on experience. Our PA's know how to do alot! Do all of them help? Nope.
    But most do, starting lines, doing urine dips, giving injections, splinting, wrappping limbs, ets..I expect that if my load is full, and something is needed NOW, that they be able to pitch in. Getting a glass of water, blanket or pillow is no big deal.

    Pg and customer service in our ER is spread amongst the staff, as a nurse who gives PAs and MDs that extra hand, and also chaperones ALOT, both I and the patients expect it!

    Maisy
  9. by   RN4Nascar
    Quote from MAISY, RN-ER
    Yikes...I am not sure I'd want a PA or NP that had no hands on experience. Our PA's know how to do alot! Do all of them help? Nope.
    But most do, starting lines, doing urine dips, giving injections, splinting, wrappping limbs, ets..I expect that if my load is full, and something is needed NOW, that they be able to pitch in. Getting a glass of water, blanket or pillow is no big deal.

    Pg and customer service in our ER is spread amongst the staff, as a nurse who gives PAs and MDs that extra hand, and also chaperones ALOT, both I and the patients expect it!

    Maisy

    At the hospital I work at, its the same thing. PAs and NPs help out when they can doing all kinds of things. Not all of them do it, but most go beyond and above to help.
    I also wouldnt want a PA or NP without any hands on experience.
  10. by   JustaGypsy
    I also feel the same as maisey and rn4nascar... Why is it such a huge imposition for a PA, NP MD or DO to grab a blanket and give it to someone? Obviously if they are busy having them not do it is understood. And, yes, maybe it is not their job, but since when is it MY job to be a "drop-and-fetch-it" for all? Do I do it? Yes... but sometimes after a long and busy shift of having someone stand at the desk and announce ALL NIGHT LONG "Where is..." and them expecting me to drop what I am doing, when my hands are full and my plate overflowing because they are too lazy to do it for themselves gets REALLY old... I am so sick of the lack of basic common courtesy turning into "it's not my job..."
  11. by   EmmaG
    Quote from JustaGypsy
    I also feel the same as maisey and rn4nascar... Why is it such a huge imposition for a PA, NP MD or DO to grab a blanket and give it to someone? Obviously if they are busy having them not do it is understood. And, yes, maybe it is not their job, but since when is it MY job to be a "drop-and-fetch-it" for all? Do I do it? Yes... but sometimes after a long and busy shift of having someone stand at the desk and announce ALL NIGHT LONG "Where is..." and them expecting me to drop what I am doing, when my hands are full and my plate overflowing because they are too lazy to do it for themselves gets REALLY old... I am so sick of the lack of basic common courtesy turning into "it's not my job..."
    What you described --- taking the patient to the bathroom, putting them on a bedpan--- is not their job. Handing them a blanket? Then yeah... if it's in the room, no biggie.
  12. by   platon20
    Quote from JustaGypsy
    I also feel the same as maisey and rn4nascar... Why is it such a huge imposition for a PA, NP MD or DO to grab a blanket and give it to someone? Obviously if they are busy having them not do it is understood. And, yes, maybe it is not their job, but since when is it MY job to be a "drop-and-fetch-it" for all? Do I do it? Yes... but sometimes after a long and busy shift of having someone stand at the desk and announce ALL NIGHT LONG "Where is..." and them expecting me to drop what I am doing, when my hands are full and my plate overflowing because they are too lazy to do it for themselves gets REALLY old... I am so sick of the lack of basic common courtesy turning into "it's not my job..."

    The reason docs dont do this very often is because they dont know where the stuff is. Each floor/unit stores their stuff in different places, and it usually means you ahve to ask 3 different people where it is before you find somebody who can tell you.

    A job that takes 30 seconds for a nurse takes about 2-4 minutes for docs/PAs because they arent familiar with where everything is on that particular unit.

    Now if a doc refuses to give a blanket to the patient and its sitting on a chair in the room, then thats just being lazy.
  13. by   globalRN
    as a np, i have a lot of work that only I, np or md colleagues can help out with.
    If i stopped to do every rn task as well...i'd never get my work done.

    So no, it isn't my job to get that bedpan or whatever.
    i will stop and go grab a warm blanket for my cold patient or help them take off ted stockings
    but all within reason.

    otherwise, i get their nurse

close