Outta Line........ - page 2

What a day!!! I get 9 patients and 3 different nurses. I'm an Extern, PCT or whatever you wanna call me. I had the middle hallway which included the nurses station so I was spread out. I started at... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    The next time she'd decide to yell, i'd remind her in a normal tone of voice, out of the earshot of pts. and co-workers, that there is a quieter, more professional way to approach someone.
  2. by   ShannonB25
    Sorry to hear about your situation..I truly hope things are better for you soon. Hang in there!!!
  3. by   casi
    These are the kind of people I love to kill with kindness. "I'm sorry. The first time I approached him he refused, so I decided to respect his wishes and legal right to say no. I was just on my way back into his room to reapproach him, would you like to come along?"

    The nurse was out of line yelling at you nobody deserves that kind of treatment at their workplace.

    I'm not an agressive person either. I would rather plead, beg, and coax instead of force. Though there are times I won't give them a choice. Instead of asking if I can change their sheets, I'll simply say "It's time to change your sheets." and start untucking corners and what not. I also tend to add something to the effect of "I'll make it fast so you can go back to ________." Otherwise was the patient aware of the state of the sheets. You could always trying pointing that out to them, and add that the change of sheets would make him feel cleaner/more comfortable/less of a infection risk.
  4. by   jeepgirl
    if he didn't want to move, and you tried... and it sounds like you tried... to convince him otherwise, then that is his choice. yes, patient's in the hospital have choices as well, and this nurse needs to realize that. i had a very non-compliant 14 year old a few weeks ago (i'm a pediatric nurse). surgical patient also. could i not force her to do anything - nope. her choice. now, i badgered her a lot, fussed at her, etc (she didn't have any parents available for most of her stay) but i couldn't make her do some of the things i wanted her to do (ambulate, TCDB, get sheets changed and bathe). honestly... you can't make anyone do anything they truely do not want to do. if this nurse goes around "forcing" patients to do things against their will, i have a problem with that. yes, you can be "agressive" in a sense with your care. but that doesn't mean being mean, hateful, or forcing patients to complete activities that are against their will.
    Last edit by jeepgirl on Dec 28, '05
  5. by   katfishLPN
    Quote from hbncns35
    What a day!!! I get 9 patients and 3 different nurses. I'm an Extern, PCT or whatever you wanna call me. I had the middle hallway which included the nurses station so I was spread out. I started at one end of the hallway and proceeded to get everyone washed up, changed and beds made. After I had a good handle on one end of the hallway I went to do a quick check on the other end. Looked like 59 went for a test so I asked Nurse "B" where he went and when he would be back. I got a "Who wants to know?" I said " I do." So I knew at this point he would be gone for awhile and I could concentrate on someone else. 63's daughter pulled me in and had me help her change the bed at least three times over 1.5 hrs while we kept her upright in a chair. She was semi-alert. So most of my time was spent with her. Halfway thru I checked on 59 and he was back so I went in there, got him washed, changed his gown and his top sheet (he would not let me change his bottom sheets, he did not want to roll over - two infected fistulas in either arm) I tried to sweet talk him but he wouldn't budge or roll over. So I got him comfy and went back to 63. I passed Nurse B and asked if she needed anything and she said "just get 59 comfortable" I replied that it had already been done. So 63 wanted to get back in bed- did that- went and drew bld on 67, changed 68, put 58 on bedpan, changed 60, and then to my surprise got accosted in the hallway by Nurse B.
    She ranted and vented on me saying that she was so embarrased that 59's bottom sheet and pad were not changed, yelling at me saying that the family had to see it and the doctor was there as well. She said That is unacceptable- you were supposed to get him comfy!!!!! I looked at her and mentioned that he would not let me and she kept ranting...I figured if I tried to do anymore explaining then it would just be an argument. So I said nothing while she pounced on me, then when I thought she was finished, I said, OK and walked off. (Whatever!!! I'm thinking)
    As far as I'm concerned I did make him comfy and did my best to get those sheets but he was yelling at me to get away. If she saw the sheets needed to be changed then she should have taken it upon herself to change them.
    Doesn't she know we all help each other out? I couldn't get to him in her required time frame but I did make him comfy.
    Any nurse that thinks it is beneath her/him to change a bed should go back to nursing school..............Oh that's the tech's job............Sometimes you gotta help out- she knew I was busy with 8 other patients. Get a grip on your emotions...............Geesh.................I let her throw her weight around and when I did not respond the way she expected, she gave up and later was civil to me..............Give me a Break!!!!HB
    I was a CNA for 3 years before becoming a nurse so I do totally understand. I do believe we all are a team and I am not above toileting/changing/cleaning any patient!! But some nurse's especially ones who were never CNA's either think it is not their job or really don't know how to do those things (or feel confident doing those things) because really that is not what they focus on in nursing school! I also agree that you have to communicate maybe even over communicate with your team members. Sorry you were "chewed out". Maybe you can explain the situation at another time when you all aren't so busy and she is in a better frame of mind because you will have to work with her again. Keep your head up sounds like you are doing a terrific job
  6. by   hbncns35
    Well,

    Today I went into work and I got pulled to another unit (the girl who was supposed to go, didn't want to, and I felt it was a good idea if I went somewhere else for the day to avoid Nurse YELL-O-FLOWER....Turns out I ended up training two new techs on another floor..........And did I YELL at them when they messed up? Of course not..............Moral is: No one wants to be YELLED at - at any time for anything - she had told me she was embarassed that the sheet was not clean - I would be more embarassed if I yelled at someone in a busy hallway and was not able to control my emotions at yet a simple situation.

    Turns out I was coming upstairs to get some Cash out of my locker and I ran into Nurse Yellowflower. She was aprox 40 feet ahead of me and I glanced at her and she was waving at me. I shifted my eyes away from her because I was walking in her direction and I was not sure if she was waving at me. As she got closer, it was apparent she was "flagging" me and she said how's floor *B? I said "Great!!!!" I probably should have said, "Great, nobody yells at me on that floor and everyone is a professional" Seems like if she continues to treat staff and patients aggresively- she'll be out of a job- I can stand to overlook some things and maybe I'll just document her and if it gets out of hand, I'll have something to go on. As a tech (extern) that's not the behavior I would want to show an upcoming grad. Techs work just as hard as Nurses and we all have to work together.

    My two orientees thanked me graciously for showing them around and helping them be Great Techs. Kind of ironic I was put in that position having just been chewed out yesterday. Nice to be appreciated for what you can do, not what you didn't do.................HB
  7. by   katfishLPN
    Quote from Bipley
    Tweety....

    You know, technically I suppose you are correct but your post still makes me feel all creepy. With that... :kiss Friendly smooches!

    We are ALL professionals when we are doing our job well. I don't like being referred to as a professional because I have a bit more college vs. a tech. Professionalism is in our attitude and action, not our education. Ever met a "professional" that is a total witch and couldn't care for her patient if her life depended on it? Is THAT a professional? She has the education, does that make her a professional?

    While I fully realize you can correct me and technically be correct, this comment has always rubbed me the wrong way. We are ALL professionals if we behave as such. For ME, professionalism is in actions, not education. But again, you could easily debate this issue and win. Doesn't mean I have to like it or fully agree.
    I was just thinking the same thing!! :yeahthat:
  8. by   caring4people
    Hello

    I have been a CNA for 7 1/2 years in long term care, I very recently (1 week ago) started a new job as a CNA at a hospital. I work the 6:45 pm to 7:15 am shift on a Med Surg/Oncology floor. I had 2 1/2 days orientation to the floor and Tues night was my second night on my own hall by myself. During my orientation we were very low census, last night I had 14 patients. I really didn't think that this was going to be as different as it is hospital vs long term care, alot of hospital stuff that I don't know.
    Anyway, I did my first set of vitals for 10 pm, then one of the nurses asked me who I had for Q 4 hr. vs and I told her, she said what about so and so and so and so I said no, they were listed as routine vs. well she proceeded in front of 3 other nurses to ask me where and why I would think that these patients were just routine vs? I told her that was the orders on the computer for these patients and she said no, surgery, pca pump patients were always 4 hr vs. for the remainder of their stays and why would I think that they were just routine vs.
    Now mind you I told her once already where I got my info from and also earlier in the shift I told her that I was a rather new CNA, but she didn't really have to embarass me like that in front of the other nurses, that did really make me feel stupid. After she finished I just walked away from her and finished doing my job for the night. She did make a comment as to how much orientation I had and I told her and she asked if I felt that was enough, so maybe she doesn't think I have orientated enough I don't know, sometimes with that many patients it can feel kind of overwhelming still. But like I said this is my first hospital CNA job, my background is Long term care, but I wanted hospital experience towards my nursing.
    One of the other nurses did comment later and said they thought I was doing a good job and that I was very helpful to them and would help them with stuff when asked.
    Sorry bout the long post just needed to vent I guess.
    THanks for listening or in this case reading.

  9. by   sjrn85
    Quote from hbncns35
    Well,

    Today I went into work and I got pulled to another unit (the girl who was supposed to go, didn't want to, and I felt it was a good idea if I went somewhere else for the day to avoid Nurse YELL-O-FLOWER....Turns out I ended up training two new techs on another floor..........And did I YELL at them when they messed up? Of course not..............Moral is: No one wants to be YELLED at - at any time for anything - she had told me she was embarassed that the sheet was not clean - I would be more embarassed if I yelled at someone in a busy hallway and was not able to control my emotions at yet a simple situation.

    Turns out I was coming upstairs to get some Cash out of my locker and I ran into Nurse Yellowflower. She was aprox 40 feet ahead of me and I glanced at her and she was waving at me. I shifted my eyes away from her because I was walking in her direction and I was not sure if she was waving at me. As she got closer, it was apparent she was "flagging" me and she said how's floor *B? I said "Great!!!!" I probably should have said, "Great, nobody yells at me on that floor and everyone is a professional" Seems like if she continues to treat staff and patients aggresively- she'll be out of a job- I can stand to overlook some things and maybe I'll just document her and if it gets out of hand, I'll have something to go on. As a tech (extern) that's not the behavior I would want to show an upcoming grad. Techs work just as hard as Nurses and we all have to work together.

    My two orientees thanked me graciously for showing them around and helping them be Great Techs. Kind of ironic I was put in that position having just been chewed out yesterday. Nice to be appreciated for what you can do, not what you didn't do.................HB
    Even if you feel you've been wronged, it's still the best (and professional thing) to try to take the high road. We all have our moments, and believe me, you will too when you're an RN. No one is perfect.
  10. by   kadokin
    Quote from Bipley
    You are on the money.

    There is a way to get a patient to do what he didn't know he wanted to do, and there is force. Not totally force, but pushing the heck out of reality.

    A GOOD nurse will end up with a patient that thought he wanted that shower. A crappy nurse will coerce him into it or not get it done at all.

    With that said, there are plenty of folks that you won't get in a shower if God himself said to bathe.
    Amen, sista!
  11. by   kadokin
    Quote from bethin
    I hear ya. I'm not the agressive type. Recently a nurse wanted a fresh open appy out of bed. He was elderly, still very groggy and a 2 assist. When she asked me to help her I refused. No way am I getting someone who is still recovering from anasthesia out of bed. I've had surgery and I know how you just want to sleep for hours after surgery. I thought it was a liability to set him up in a chair.

    Could you have changed the pts. sheets while he was gone for tests? I know it's hard sometimes to catch them while they're gone. It sounds like you were running around trying to help everyone at once. What does she expect -- for you to grow 8 arms???
    Didn't they issue those 6 extra arms to you during training/school? An oversight on the part of your educators.
  12. by   Bipley
    Quote from bethin
    The OP didn't mention anything about an appy. I was using it as an example when she mentioned aggressiveness.

    I've seen some appy's up and walking hours after surgery. That's fine for them but not for everyone. In the case I mentioned, the man was elderly, very groggy and a 2 assist. No way could we leave him in a chair. He'd fall asleep and fall out of the chair. Like you said, it depends on the pt.
    I wasn't referring to this particular patient. I was writing in general.
  13. by   hbncns35
    Just an update - Ms. Yell-o decided to be alot more civil to me today actually helping me change a patient and being more agreeable, guess she realized her mistake and made more of an effort..............Hb

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