Out of nursing program cause i am smoker!!! - page 6

Help, I am at risk of being out of the nursing program because I am a smoker. I really could use some advise on how to deal with a very unfair instructor. I am a first year PN student and we... Read More

  1. by   PANurseRN1
    So are you really out of the program because you're a smoker?
  2. by   lorster
    Quote from brefni
    I cannot believe some of the responses to this thread. Does anyone not see the real problem here? This instructor is using her authority to harass this person. This behavior is bullying and all too often condoned in this profession. This instructor is using the issue of smoking as an excuse and she should be reported immediately. As a non-smoker and a nurse, I have smelled worse things than cigarette smoke and so have all of you. Second hand smoke has been proven harmful but the actual odor of it has not. This student needs your advice and help dealing with this insecure, unprofessional bully, not a lecture on the harmful effects of tobacco.
    I absolutely agree. This is so high school. Reminds me of when the princepal took the doors off the girls bathroom because they were all in there smoking between classes. Come on. The thread starter knows that smoking is bad. This instructor is doing the same thing to this young future nurse as many nurses do...eating her young!
  3. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    I can kinda understand her reasoning, patients do not want to smell dirty ciggarettes while they are being cared for!

    swtooth
  4. by   mammaoftwo
    I don't know if the instructor can do what she says or not. Today during classes, there is a girl (wanting to be a nurse) that smells of cigarette smoke so bad it almost made me gag. No one would sit close to her. I don't know what will happen if she makes it into the program. I'm sure the instructors will say something to her about smelling like smoke that strong. I didn't really see any other students outside smoking today. I did see an instructor though. I believe I would go ahead and do the papers and still pursue the grievence just to be safe. I would not take a chance on throwing your career and hard work away. Good luck.
  5. by   JaneyW
    Actually, there has been research showing the harmful effects of second hand smoke breathed in from people's clothing. I work in perinatal and give my smoking lecture and cessation info to all the dads and relatives that come in from their smoke breaks smelling of smoke. Picking up babies and cradling them to your smokey clothing is just like smoking into their faces. I would assume it would be similar to have smoke all over your uniform and then be leaning into patients faces to help or assess them. I see the angle on the bullying and I do agree. It is just that you can't not "get it" about smoking and be a health care professional. I am very impressed with the descriptions of the schools that have policies against getting even a trace of smoke on your uniform.
  6. by   Soup Turtle
    Quote from brefni
    I cannot believe some of the responses to this thread. Does anyone not see the real problem here? This instructor is using her authority to harass this person. This behavior is bullying and all too often condoned in this profession. This instructor is using the issue of smoking as an excuse and she should be reported immediately. As a non-smoker and a nurse, I have smelled worse things than cigarette smoke and so have all of you. Second hand smoke has been proven harmful but the actual odor of it has not. This student needs your advice and help dealing with this insecure, unprofessional bully, not a lecture on the harmful effects of tobacco.
    The student really didn't seem to understand the harmful effects of smoking where patients are concerned. If she did, she wouldn't have compared her situation to the teacher's eating too much junk food.

    I agree that the smell of smoke is not harmful, but where there's a smell...
    I am allergic to cigarette smoke. It makes me sneeze, cough and gives me a horrible headache almost instantly. Sometimes, my body reacts to the smoke before I smell anything. In fact, it happens pretty often! I could care less about the smell, itself.
    Last edit by Soup Turtle on Jan 8, '07
  7. by   mavisdavis
    I believe that the issue is not really smoking. I believe that the sense of entitlement is the issue.

    Good grief, you could write a two page paper in 45 minutes. Oh what a shame -- you had to get up at 5:30.

    A lawsuit? Over this? My lands!

    It would seem to me that the sense of entitlement that so many of the younger generation exhibit has undermined their ability to deal with adversity.
  8. by   DavieRN
    Quote from TurtleSoup
    The student really didn't seem to understand the harmful effects of smoking where patients are concerned. If she did, she wouldn't have compared her situation to the teacher's eating too much junk food.

    I agree that the smell of smoke is not harmful, but where there's a smell...
    I am allergic to cigarette smoke. It makes me sneeze, cough and gives me a horrible headache almost instantly. Sometimes, my body reacts to the smoke before I smell anything. In fact, it happens pretty often! I could care less about the smell, itself.

    I totally agree with this statement. I have a problem with cigarette smoke, some of the cigarette smoke mearly causes me to have a tight sensation in my throat, others (maybe a different brand) causes my whole chest to become tight and I have to leave the area ( or smoke smelling person) immediately.

    The most important thing to consider is the safety of your patients. I am a very healthy individual with no other breathing problems, until exposed to certain brands of cigarette smoke. I don't know which ones effect me until someone exercises the right to smoke, and just happens to reek of the one that wrecks up my breathing.

    I also agree that to a non- smoker or allergic person the smell does NOT go away because Febreaze, or some other spray is used to try and mask it. It only compounds the problem by adding more chemicals to the carcinogenics and causing in some cases an even stronger odor for the patient to react to.

    To the original poster I am very sorry that your instructor chose to treat you in a childish manner. But I hope that you can continue without any more problems from this.

    Good luck,

    Gichasome
  9. by   jimthorp
    Quote from brefni
    Does anyone not see the real problem here?
    I do and thus my reponses. If we allow college instructors to continue to abuse their authority and make up their own rules to suit their own biases, what is to prevent one from coming along who has a stick up her/his butt for men with a gotee or pony tail... I could go on but you get the point. As students we should be judged by measured performance against clear objectives and not on whether we meet our instructor's personal perception of what a good nurse should be. Rules must be laid out up front and in writing.

    We are paying customers of higher education, not pawns to be pushed around and bullied by power tripping, power hungry educators. Educators like this do nothing to advance the profession or foster professional behavior but in fact, create nurses with the same attitude.

    Timothy is wrong! The instructor is not always right. I have successfully challenged several.

    Having said all this, the OP has not yet said whether or not the rule she broke was laid out up front in writing. If it is then clearly the penalty does not fit the crime. Withholding a docked grade, public humiliation, and assigning extra work is clearly more penalty than this rules infraction deserves, i.e. abuse of power.

    This whole thing smells of a problem with higher education in general and that is the existance of a heavy-handed and censorious climate of left-wing orthodoxy.
  10. by   LPN0608
    I think it's unfair that the teacher talked to you in the hallway(should have been in an office). Kinda creepy she called u @ home. Just weird to tell your momma on u.:uhoh21: I'm in the same situation. First year LPN student and I smoke. We can't smoke at clinicals or smell like it either. Matter of fact, down here in Mississippi, we have to smoke in the parking lot(at school) well away from the building or get a fine. I don't mind. Wouldn't want to have to breathe in someone else's smoke, if I didn't smoke. I agree with everyone else, Pt's could be allergic to the smoke. Besides if your smoking, who's watching your patients? I'm addicted to the smoke too but I just try to stay busy enough to not think about it. If I'm desparate for a cig., I go find something else to do. BTW, I think it's pretty childish that you broke the no smoking rule and u wanna sue? ***? Learn a lesson and write the paper. And please stop making all other Nursing students and newbies look immature and self-centered. Thanks.
  11. by   HuggyPuglet
    Quote from mavisdavis
    I believe that the issue is not really smoking. I believe that the sense of entitlement is the issue.

    Good grief, you could write a two page paper in 45 minutes. Oh what a shame -- you had to get up at 5:30.

    A lawsuit? Over this? My lands!

    It would seem to me that the sense of entitlement that so many of the younger generation exhibit has undermined their ability to deal with adversity.
    This response is totally off topic with regard to the OP's predicament, but your post brought to mind something that happened several years ago. Unfortunately Mavis we, the older generation, may have created this monster. Years ago when my son had just graduated from high school (mid 80s) we were surprised to find his former history teacher working at a gas station. During the conversation we were equally surprised to hear that he had quit his position due to a difference of opinion of how he conducted his class. Apparently he gave out an assignment...list the presidents, their vice presidents and the years they presided. This was in preparation for a longer, more intense study of the US presidential administrations but he gave it out to give the students the exposure to the very basics of the studies they were to embark upon. Some may think it menial 'busy work' but he must have seen some value in it. He gave the students a full month to complete the assignment, and gave the page numbers (all TWO of them) to the students where the information was already listed. Well, some of the students whined over all the 'hard' work they had to do, some of the parents complained to the principal, and threatened to take the whole mess to the BOE. The weenie principal then not only made the teacher rescind the assignment but also demanded that the teacher apologize to the students for it! The teacher chose to just leave his position rather than apologize to a bunch of whiners for such a 'hard' assignment. The only thing that happened was that the high school lost a valuable teacher who was able to connect with his students and bring history to life, and the students didn't have to spend not one hour (about as long as the assignment would have taken) doing that terribly hard assignment. I think he was simply burned out dealing with students who didn't want to do the work and parents who supported that and simultaneously complained about why their little precious couldn't didn't seem to be learning anything.

    Again, this is totally off topic but I see where you are coming from, Mavis.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    It was a part of our "dress code" rule that our clothes not smell like smoke. Our instructors made it clear that it wouldn't be tolerated.

    (I know, i know, the OP did not say if that's written policy for their school...)
  13. by   jimthorp
    Quote from JaneyW
    Actually, there has been research showing the harmful effects of second hand smoke breathed in from people's clothing.
    I'd be interested in these studies. Could you point the way?

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