orientationg new nurse

  1. hello

    i usually dont vent in this forum, but today i feel like venting. do you guys find it difficult to orient new nurses? i started a new job at the subacute nursing home and the nurses who are suppose to be orienting me wont let me do anything, they are acting like they are going to lose their license if they let me pass meds etc.. then they would ask me to take vitals, go to the other side of the unit where other nurse is assigned and do her admissions. i feel like she is telling me to do this to get rid of me. am i suppose to put up this and smile and finsh my orientation or am i suppose to stand up for myself and say something? i know its not easy to orient new nurse, but its not easy to be oriented, trying to make sure i dont bother them too much while learning new stuff. what do you guys suggest?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Piscean
    I think you really need to talk to someone who has authority about this. Because there's more involved than just taking vitals being a nurse. Your not going to be prepared at all at this pace.
  4. by   Virgo_RN
    Well, I have never oriented a new nurse, as I am new myself, plus being an LPN it would be inappropriate for me to orient an RN, but....I agree with the above post.
  5. by   Shantas
    You should talk to your manager. Many nurses dont feel comfortable with orienting new hires, In our hospital in order to be a perceptor you have to take a course. Its completely voluntary. So when the supervisor do the schedule they try to schedule the new hire with the staff who is trained and willing to orient.
  6. by   BklynNurse
    How long have you been on orientation? maybe they are just breaking you in slowly, give it another week, if nothing changes speak to the nurse, let her know you want to learn and do more. Also are you following any type of competency check list? If so go over it with the nurse who is orienting you so she knows you what you expect to be shown. good luck, it will get easier.
  7. by   RedWeasel
    When I oriented my first new nurse, basically they said, "Find out what she knows and observe her day one," but come on! I think they should know you know the basics! Talk to them. I know some pp feel orienting a new person slows them down because they don't want to 'teach'--as they go. Course, then they shouldn't have agreed to orient. I wonder do they get a bonus at your place to orient? Maybe she feels she can get perks without doing the works? Good luck--and you can always learn here on allnurses, from our flubs, humor, mistakes, etc. I wanted to do it to teach a new nurse all those things I had wished I knew in the beginning...basically ask her, "Can you tell me some things you wish you had known when you started?"
    Last edit by RedWeasel on Nov 30, '07
  8. by   fultzymom
    Maybe your preceptor just does not like doing orientation. I would talk with your DON or unit manager about getting a new preceptor. You need to be doing everything that you will be expected to do when you are the one in charge. She is not doing you any favors by not letting you get in there and do new things. If you don't learn it now, when you are off of orientation, you are not going to be able to handle things by yourself.
  9. by   CoffeeRTC
    Wow...you should definately be getting your hands dirty. It has been a while since I've had a new nurse (out of school new) but I normally start off by asking them their strengths. The first day or so, I just want them to shadow me and watch most things. Vitals, helping transfers, learning the lay of the building, whose who and those type of things. Next day or so, I'm having them pass some meds, do some treatments, write a few notes, call a doc, do assessments. Duing this, we get into the reams of required papework for all the assessments and review the nursing home regulations etc.
    I find this has seemed to work well for most. It is definately interactive and there is no sitting around etc. I
    find it can be very overwhelming in the LTC, skilled or sub acute facilities because of the number of patients, autonomy that we have, being thrown into a supervisory position dealing with staff issues etc. Maybe they are sheltering you too much? If that is the case...it won't prepare you for nada.
  10. by   longjourneydream
    i know where you are coming from.

    when i was in clinicals, and at the end of my nursing program, my preceptor just babied me and really never let me do anything.

    when i compared notes with the other student nurses, i was surprised at how much they actually got to do.

    i called myself a glorified nurses assistant that wore a college student nursing uniform!

    any way enough with me...

    it is not fair to you.

    speak up now, or set yourself up for failure...

    during orientation, in my presonal opinion, is:

    1. one needs exposure to all that all nurses get exposed to on a daily basis.

    2. should have someone available at all times to check you off, on procedures not familiar with.

    3. should not be let go too soon (sink or swim attitiude).

    4. review the day and see what things need improvement, and what strengths you already have and celebrate that accomplishment.

    5. preceptor must have a positive attitude,is very knowlegable, and has great resourses if he/she does not have answer to a question!

    this is your career.

    don't get off on the wrong foot.

    be assertive and tell them what you need, and be clear about it.

    if they are not receptive then guess what???


    dol not put up with that type of treatment.



    Quote from graduatenurse
    hello

    i usually dont vent in this forum, but today i feel like venting. do you guys find it difficult to orient new nurses? i started a new job at the subacute nursing home and the nurses who are suppose to be orienting me wont let me do anything, they are acting like they are going to lose their license if they let me pass meds etc.. then they would ask me to take vitals, go to the other side of the unit where other nurse is assigned and do her admissions. i feel like she is telling me to do this to get rid of me. am i suppose to put up this and smile and finsh my orientation or am i suppose to stand up for myself and say something? i know its not easy to orient new nurse, but its not easy to be oriented, trying to make sure i dont bother them too much while learning new stuff. what do you guys suggest?
    Last edit by longjourneydream on Nov 30, '07
  11. by   rita359
    Don't know how far along you are in orientation. There is a whole lot more to caring for a patient than passing meds. One of those things is getting comfortable with admitting patients to your level of care. Generally there is a lot of paperwork involved that you definitely need to be comfortable with. Talk to your preceptor and ask what her plan is as far as priorities for your learning. Then you will have a better idea whether you should be upset or not.
  12. by   AliRae
    Quote from silvergirl
    When I oriented my first new nurse, basically they said, "Find out what she knows and observe her day one,"
    It really does depend on how far along in your orientation you are. I've precepted many new nurses, and I just had them sit back and enjoy the ride the first day (or couple days if they're brand new) they're with me. Gave me a chance to talk with them and suss out what their comfort level and skills are. After that, we sit down and talk about learning styles and how that particular nurse learns best. If they're a doer, often we'd practice a skill on a doll before going into a room to do it for the first time. If they're more of a verbal learner, I'd get them to talk me through procedures before we perform them. Each day after a shift we set goals for the next shift and go from there. Our unit had an orientation book, too, with a list of skills that had to get checked off, so I used that as a guide.

    I love precepting (maybe that's why I was so torn between nursing and teaching when I started college?), but not everyone should be precepting. Talk to your manager about your concerns. Mention especially that you don't think you're going to be ready. Bring up safety- they can't very well ignore you if you say "I don't think I'll be able to practice safely given the orientation experience I've had so far." Good luck!

    *sigh* I miss it already. I'm not doing so well with this whole taking-time-off-between-jobs thing!

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