Only Crusty Old Bats will remember..

  1. So, I really need a fun thread right now. We've done similar things before and it's always fun.
    so, things Crusty Old Bats(COB) remember that new nurses today will not.

    1. The clunk your uniform makes when you drop it in the laundry hamper and you realize you came home with the narcotic keys.

    2. The splat the over full paper chart makes when you drop it on the floor. Papers everywhere. 15 mins getting everything back together.

    3. The smell of the smoking lounge .

    4. Nurse and Docs smoking at the Nsg Station.

    5. Trying to match the colour of the urine in the test tube to determine the sugar level.
    +1? +2? Which one?

    OK my fellow COBs. Jump in!
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  2. 452 Comments

  3. by   WKShadowRN
    Charting in different color ink for first, second, or third shift.

    Clipboards at the foot of the bed for rounds.

    Giving up your seat to the doctor. My first preceptor post RN obtainment insisted on it and some docs at that hospital expected it. The surgeons called the surgical floor "God's country." (verbatim).

    Going by your title and last name "Nurse Shadow." (I kind of liked and miss that.)

    Kardexes when done correctly were the bible of the patient's plan of care (both medical and nursing).
  4. by   meanmaryjean
    Polishing my white Clinic shoes and scrubbing the laces before clinicals. Yes, they were inspected.
    The addressograph machine
    Hand crank beds (in other words, the patient could not raise/ lower their head themselves)
    OB before epidural anesthesia
    Wards
  5. by   Pepper The Cat
    Ah yes, 3 colour charting. What Fun!

    Crank beds! I remember how excited I was when I started a new job and all the beds were electronic!
  6. by   caliotter3
    I had a geezer home care patient who told me that when I answered his phone, I should refer to myself as "Nurse last name". That is the only time anyone has ever made mention of proper forms of addressing each other or oneself.
  7. by   WKShadowRN
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Polishing my white Clinic shoes and scrubbing the laces before clinicals. Yes, they were inspected.
    The addressograph machine
    Hand crank beds (in other words, the patient could not raise/ lower their head themselves)
    OB before epidural anesthesia
    Wards
    Ihavenickedmyfingerswiththosebluecardstryingtoswip ethedangthing.

    I am sorry my space bar seems to be malfunctioning.
  8. by   WKShadowRN
    Maybe tomorrow at work I will introduce myself as Nurse Shadow instead of, "Hi, My name is WK and I am one of the nurses."
  9. by   caliotter3
    Quote from WKShadowRN
    Maybe tomorrow at work I will introduce myself as Nurse Shadow instead of, "Hi, My name is WK and I am one of the nurses."
    There's always, "I am one of the hired help."
  10. by   poppycat
    I'm surprised no one has mentioned glass IV bottles.
    Having to adjust IV flow rates using a roller clamp & your watch.
  11. by   sevensonnets
    Oh yes, having an absolute heart attack when the chart went splat all over the floor, usually when the chart was long overdue to be thinned. Counting narcs was never fun. Once the nurse counting with me caught the Demerol box on the edge of the shelf and 25 Demerols came raining down on our heads. We found all but one and had to do an incident report with the supervisor. I found it in my pocket when I got home! I used to make a postop bed in layers so all you had to do was peel off a layer every day and you never had to change the bed for days. Lots more but I'm tired right now.
  12. by   nursej22
    Flat, non-fitted sheets, fingercots, Bird respirators for breathing treatments, tincture of opium.
  13. by   Emergent
    IVs connected with needles instead of claves. IVP meds were given via syringe with needle into a hub. Needleless systems unknown.

    Potassium kept concentrated in the units.

    Continuing Ed consisted real classes and skills days instead of computer classes.

    DAR and SOAP charting.

    IV lines flushed with saline , then heparin, they were called heplocks, not saline locks.
    Last edit by Emergent on Oct 29, '16
  14. by   Susie2310
    Chart throwing by a doctor. Yes, right across the room.

    Huge chart racks at the Nurses Station.

    Paper charts and MARS; rolodex type Kardexes; being taught to check for Homan's sign in nursing school and doing this in clinicals; hanging an IV bag, counting the drips by your watch and using a roller clamp to adjust the rate; volutrols; latex gloves.

    An atmosphere of pride and satisfaction in care given; daily morning bed baths using soap, water, and washcloths, and bed linen changes; making mitred corners with bed sheets; lots of experienced nurses; Heparin locks on peripheral IV's; hanging Aminophylline on ICU step-down in nursing school; Heparin infusions for stroke patients; huge binders full of paper policies and procedures.

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