Oncology RN Forced to Resign - page 2

by Done 11,169 Views | 46 Comments

For my second year of nursing, I was hired to become an Oncology Nurse. It was not my first choice because of the multiple cancer stricken family members I have in my life right now. Eventually, I made peace with it since I... Read More


  1. 4
    I really worry sometimes about whether it is a good idea to be posting such specific information about an ongoing investigation on a public forum.

    Done, it sounds like you have had a lot going on in your life, both personally and professionally. A hard road to travel for someone just coming into an already difficult profession. I hope that you can find the answers that you need and that you are able to move on from this awful experience.
    nursemichelle80, dishes, Sparrowhawk, and 1 other like this.
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    It doesn't sound like an ongoing investigation. If she was forced to resign then I think the case is considered closed
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    Did I miss something?? Did they have you take a drug test when this was first brought up?

    You said that you took your own store bought test, but what about a test that the facility sets up?

    I'm confused
  4. 0
    I am confused too.. I am not sure what your "outgoing, bubbly personality" has to do with documentation or lack therof. Typically if they have a suspicion, you get pulled off the floor and made to Pee in a cup on the spot. Once they determine what you are
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    Your post is very interesting from a statement analysis perspective. I didn't read anything in it that says "I did not take any drugs." Instead, it's a rather rambling account of how you fit the diverter profile, and how there's nothing an "investigator" will find in your "background."

    I had a similar problem a few years back. I was new to the pyxis system and I forgot to witness my narcotic wastes. Of course, my boss eventually had to talk to me, but the first words out of my mouth were "I don't take drugs, and I will take drug urine and hair test right this minute."

    If you are innocent, then tell them straight out you didn't do it, and prove it any way you can.

    If you are guilty, admitting it is the first step to getting help. We are all vunerable to diversion. It's one of nursing's dirty little secrets, how many of us fall prey to addiction.

    If you did it, please get help, because it will only get worse. Addiction thrives on secrecy and denial. If you didn't, get a lawyer and clear your name. I wish you all the best.
    dishes, mazy, not.done.yet, and 5 others like this.
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    I hope this doesn't make oncology nurses afraid to give narcotics. My son suffered cancer for 8 years before he passed away 2 years ago. We had to beg and beg and beg for pain meds. Cancer was in his colon, liver and both lungs, then finally in his brain, but everyone looked at him like he was just a drug-seeker.
    Hoozdo, mazy, Zaphod, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from applewhitern
    I hope this doesn't make oncology nurses afraid to give narcotics. My son suffered cancer for 8 years before he passed away 2 years ago. We had to beg and beg and beg for pain meds. Cancer was in his colon, liver and both lungs, then finally in his brain, but everyone looked at him like he was just a drug-seeker.
    I am so sorry to hear that. I've never had a problem in hospice with being able to get adequate pain control for my patients but that is an integral part of the hospice philosophy.
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    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    I am so sorry to hear that. I've never had a problem in hospice with being able to get adequate pain control for my patients but that is an integral part of the hospice philosophy.
    one would think it would be part of the 'cancer' philosophy as well.

    applewhite, your son's experience was unconscionable.
    i'm so sorry for your loss.

    leslie
    demylenated likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Had one company I was staffing for instruct me to leave all medications in the house after the patient passed and not destroy them with a witness because they had had "problems" Really so leaving them in the families hands until a field nurse can pick them up is a better solution? The field nurse did come before I left counted the medication ( did not ask me to countersign) and left with them.
    When I worked hospice, we never took the medications away. They belonged to the patient, and just as if a patient would pass with us not there, it was the families responsibility. We would ask them if they wanted us to destroy them, and they would have to countersign, but it was their decision.

    When my father passed away, we had 3 bottles of morphine in the cabinet. Because I was afraid of some of my family misusing it, I dumped it. I don't want them getting into something that could spiral out of control. People aren't educated enough about narcotics and medications.

    Hospice is great with eol issues. That is one thing that we ensure is patient comfort. There is no such thing as developing an addiction when you have a death sentence, yanno?

    I'm sorry you had to lose you job, but it is a great learning experience. Documentation is the NUMBER ONE thing they stress in nursing school, especially with Narcotics. You cannot CYA enough as far as I am concerned. Please use this to learn everything you can about documentation. As someone said - other people rely on your documentation as well.
  10. 1
    Quote from demylenated
    When I worked hospice, we never took the medications away. They belonged to the patient, and just as if a patient would pass with us not there, it was the families responsibility. We would ask them if they wanted us to destroy them, and they would have to countersign, but it was their decision.
    This is usually what we do but only with the medications provided by the hospice (basically the only ones that the crisis care nurses use) though often the family will take the opportunity for use to document and destroy everything. Usually I do it with the nurse that comes to do the death call. Never had a problem.

    It was just weird that they thought the best solution to avoid misuse was to have one nurse document it and then transport the medication in her own car. I just documented that I received the verbal instructions from x nurse and witnessed her taking them from house. Documenting and destroying them together would have protected both of us. Of course this particular company doesn't have a proper MAR and I have in the past been instructed to "give whatever I like" or "whatever it says on the bottle" even when the bottle has no directions.
    demylenated likes this.


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