Oncology job opportunity vs pregnancy | allnurses

Oncology job opportunity vs pregnancy

  1. 0 I am 2 months pregnant and have been applying for couple of jobs for the past 2 months. For the first time (EVER) I got a call for an interview, BUT it is for oncology unit. I know that there are things that a pregnant woman should avoid like radiation/radioactive patients.. I am debating myself if I should push for the job or just decline it because of my pregnancy.. Should I tell the HR that I am pregnant during the interview or after I get hired?? Has anyone experienced this or knew someone who went through this situation?? I need advices please???
  2. Visit  iCare24 profile page

    About iCare24

    From 'US'; Joined Dec '11; Posts: 45; Likes: 21.

    16 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    2
    If your job is going to require you to handle chemotherapy, my suggestion would be for you to move on to another position. As a new oncology nurse, you will need that experience administering chemo. If you're pregnant and plan on breast feeding, it could be well over a year before you're in a position to hang chemo. This would put you behind the 8-ball in terms of learning your job. It could also cause some resentment among your co-workers if you start a new job and right off the bat can't do a major portion of it because of your pregnancy.

    I'm sure someone else will come along and say this is not being supportive or an example of NETY. Whatever...it's also reality. If you were already working there and became pregnant, that would be one thing. This is something totally different. Give yourself some time and see if something more suitable becomes available.
    NurseLoveJoy88 and iCare24 like this.
  4. Visit  Ashley, PICU RN profile page
    1
    I actually asked a similar question in the oncology forum recently. According to some of the nurses there, the pregnant nurses care for and administer chemotherapy. Provided you're wearing the appropriate protective equipment during care and administration, it's not contra-indicated during pregnancy.

    However, I think the biggest issue with accepting any job at this point would be the fact that you will be taking leave so soon. I don't recommend telling the facility that you are pregnant, as you likely will not be offered the job. However, keep in mind that you won't be eligible for FLMA or paid maternity leave. You will not have much accumulated sick time, so your maternity leave will be almost entirely unpaid. You'll also only be given the standard 6 weeks of job protection, so you won't be able to take a longer leave and still have your job guaranteed. If your orientation is 6 months, you'll be going on leave at just about the time you finish orientation.
    iCare24 likes this.
  5. Visit  iCare24 profile page
    0
    I don't know what the job requires a new grad like me to do yet.. I have read couple of forums saying that working in oncology floor is fine as long as internal radiations are avoided and proper protective gears are worn. I also agree with the fact that the biggest issue might be me taking a leave soon after the orientation is over. I have an interview on Monday and I will just address it to the interviewer just to be on the safe side. If I don't get the job, oh well, there's more job coming. If I do, that will be great too.. But we'll see. Thank you guys for the advices! I'll post updates after my interview..
  6. Visit  wish_me_luck profile page
    1
    I am doing my practicum on an oncology floor and I did Adult III on oncology. A lot of times, if the hospital is small enough, you will also get med-surg patients that are non-chemo. Just ask if it's possible that you can have them until you are done with your pregnancy. If they only deal with oncology patients, that won't be possible. But, also, you have to be certified to deal with chemo, so if you aren't certified, they CAN'T give you a patient that has to have chemo. Also, steer clear of radiation, again I think you have to be trained for that. I would ask what type of patients they get--if it's strictly oncology or if it is a hodge podge but just designated as an oncology floor.
    iCare24 likes this.
  7. Visit  iCare24 profile page
    0
    Thanks guys for your time to share your opinions. I really appreciate it!!!!
  8. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    0
    Quote from Ashley, PICU RN
    I actually asked a similar question in the oncology forum recently. According to some of the nurses there, the pregnant nurses care for and administer chemotherapy. Provided you're wearing the appropriate protective equipment during care and administration, it's not contra-indicated during pregnancy.

    However, I think the biggest issue with accepting any job at this point would be the fact that you will be taking leave so soon. I don't recommend telling the facility that you are pregnant, as you likely will not be offered the job. However, keep in mind that you won't be eligible for FLMA or paid maternity leave. You will not have much accumulated sick time, so your maternity leave will be almost entirely unpaid. You'll also only be given the standard 6 weeks of job protection, so you won't be able to take a longer leave and still have your job guaranteed. If your orientation is 6 months, you'll be going on leave at just about the time you finish orientation.
    It depends on unit policy/culture. ONS guidelines say that if you're wearing the appropriate PPE you may still give chemo while pregnant, but what I've seen in reality...people stop giving it when they're "trying to get pregnant."
  9. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    0
    Quote from iCare24
    I don't know what the job requires a new grad like me to do yet.. I have read couple of forums saying that working in oncology floor is fine as long as internal radiations are avoided and proper protective gears are worn. I also agree with the fact that the biggest issue might be me taking a leave soon after the orientation is over. I have an interview on Monday and I will just address it to the interviewer just to be on the safe side. If I don't get the job, oh well, there's more job coming. If I do, that will be great too.. But we'll see. Thank you guys for the advices! I'll post updates after my interview..
    May I give you one last piece of advice? It's advice, not "advices." I saw it in your OP and thought maybe it was a typo, but since you wrote it again it probably isn't. It's interesting...I've seen quite a few of the younger posters do this. In fact, there's a thread where this is sort of a running joke. Is it a text "thing?"
  10. Visit  NurseLoveJoy88 profile page
    0
    Quote from OCNRN63
    May I give you one last piece of advice? It's advice, not "advices." I saw it in your OP and thought maybe it was a typo, but since you wrote it again it probably isn't. It's interesting...I've seen quite a few of the younger posters do this. In fact, there's a thread where this is sort of a running joke. Is it a text "thing?"
    I noticed the same thing. I'm 23 y/o and don't use advices. I don't think its' a text thing.
  11. Visit  iCare24 profile page
    0
    Ooops sorry!! It's a grammar error. I am still trying to improve my English. I am not perfect and no one is perfect. However, I know that there's always a room for improvement. It's my third language, so I have to learn it the hard way.
    I'll try harder next time and thanks for the ADVICE. Haha
  12. Visit  sleepRN profile page
    1
    I have worked all my nursing career in inpatient oncology. I plan on starting a family soon so I switched to a medical floor 2 weeks ago. In oncology, we never assigned the pregnant girls patients that are getting chemo during that shift. I believe the ONS states while administering chemo with PPE while pregnant is OK, effects of doing so is still inconclusive. I chose to remove myself from the environment for now. Are there fumes in patient's sweat, urine, etc. that are still active days after chemo?, Was there a chemo spill on a surface that no one knows about that I may come into contact with? Etc.... Maybe I 'm just paranoid. It's a personal decision, though. Good luck!
    Last edit by sleepRN on Feb 26, '12 : Reason: edit
    iCare24 likes this.
  13. Visit  NurseLoveJoy88 profile page
    1
    Quote from iCare24
    Ooops sorry!! It's a grammar error. I am still trying to improve my English. I am not perfect and no one is perfect. However, I know that there's always a room for improvement. It's my third language, so I have to learn it the hard way.
    I'll try harder next time and thanks for the ADVICE. Haha
    No worries! I'm just upset at that one poster that thought it was a "younger" generational thing... yup, everyone over 50 have the perfect grammar on this site.
    Backtoyou2011 likes this.
  14. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    0
    Quote from iCare24
    Ooops sorry!! It's a grammar error. I am still trying to improve my English. I am not perfect and no one is perfect. However, I know that there's always a room for improvement. It's my third language, so I have to learn it the hard way.
    I'll try harder next time and thanks for the ADVICE. Haha

    Third language! How wonderful! What other languages do you speak? I speak English, obviously, Spanish and just enough French to get myself in trouble.


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