NY Mandates "BSN in 10"

  1. So, this happened last year, but I just found out about it last night. NYS now requires all RNs to have a BSN within ten years of licensure. People who are already nurses or are currently in school are grandfathered in, but this seems like big news. I have several questions and concerns. Most importantly, why is this mandated, but staffing ratios aren't? Even though current nurses are grandfathered in, won't they still have to get the BSN due to employer demand? Are accrediting boards going to look at current nursing school curriculum and create updates to meet the needs of the modern nursing climate? It will also be interesting to see what happens to diploma/community college programs. Perhaps they will survive by entering into partnership with four year programs?

    I am not against continuing education. I will earn my BSN this summer. I am mostly angry that more requirements are being placed on nurses, yet issues like workplace safety, stagnant salaries and under staffing are seemingly being ignored.

    What do you think about this change?
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  2. 24 Comments

  3. by   elkpark
    Wow, they finally passed that? It's been proposed for many years but hadn't gone anywhere. Keep in mind that the only other US state that ever passed a BSN requirement ended up rescinding the law several years later. We'll see what happens, I guess.
  4. by   SaltySarcasticSally
    I'm in a RN-BSN program now because I have to do it. I'm not against learning, I will be learning my whole career. But I'm against taking on more debt for something that will not further my own personal goals at this time.

    I don't brood over it because it's pointless but the classes we are taking are all online and very basic. All things already covered in my associate's program. It's a racket to go through, especially if your like me and have no desire to get a master's or be an NP. Maybe I would have done it on my own in the future but it would have been nice to have that choice.

    But that's our country for ya, we mandate things that make no sense while completely ignoring the bigger issues, like the need for staffing ratios.
  5. by   Farawyn
    I'm grandfathered in. Not doing it, as a school and home care RN.

    Going forward, I think it's for the best.
  6. by   TAKOO01
    I agree with you, SaltySarcasticSally. The BSN program I am in adds little to my education and I feel like it is a racket, too. If the BSN is mandated, then there has to be a change in the curriculum to reflect the current needs in nursing.
  7. by   TAKOO01
    Hi Farawyn. I love your posts over in School Nursing. My concern for nurses like you is: what if you need to switch jobs? A prospective new employer may prefer that a new hire get the BSN. They may not explicitly state that a grandfathered nurse wont be hired, but the chance for discrimination does exist.

    Responsibility for improving nursing should not fall solely on the nurses' shoulders. It does not seem sensible or fair if nursing job conditions and BSN school curricula are not also improved/standardized. Raising the standard of entry should raise the standards of the profession as a whole.
  8. by   TAKOO01
    Quote from elkpark
    Wow, they finally passed that? It's been proposed for many years but hadn't gone anywhere. Keep in mind that the only other US state that ever passed a BSN requirement ended up rescinding the law several years later. We'll see what happens, I guess.
    That's interesting - I will Google to see which state rescinded their law. I won't say that mandating a higher education is wrong, or that I want to see the NY law rescinded, but it has to make sense. I think there are nurses who wouldn't mind being mandated if there was a corresponding benefit.
  9. by   elkpark
    Quote from TAKOO01
    That's interesting - I will Google to see which state rescinded their law. I won't say that mandating a higher education is wrong, or that I want to see the NY law rescinded, but it has to make sense. I think there are nurses who wouldn't mind being mandated if there was a corresponding benefit.
    It was North Dakota. It wasn't a "BSN in 10" type thing, they just mandated that you had to have a BSN to be eligible for licensure.
  10. by   AutumnApple
    I have a friend from NY and she said the mandate wasn't a big deal "Because everyone worth working for was requiring them anyway." So, even if it was not mandated, you had to have it or you'd be working in some toilet hole.
  11. by   Farawyn
    Quote from TAKOO01
    Hi Farawyn. I love your posts over in School Nursing. My concern for nurses like you is: what if you need to switch jobs? A prospective new employer may prefer that a new hire get the BSN. They may not explicitly state that a grandfathered nurse wont be hired, but the chance for discrimination does exist.

    Responsibility for improving nursing should not fall solely on the nurses' shoulders. It does not seem sensible or fair if nursing job conditions and BSN school curricula are not also improved/standardized. Raising the standard of entry should raise the standards of the profession as a whole.
    I will not be switching jobs... and if I ever went back to the hospital I would want a refresher despite my home care experience.
    As for the "in"? I got a guy. Still have many connections at my old hospital, including the DON.
  12. by   Farawyn
    Quote from AutumnApple
    I have a friend from NY and she said the mandate wasn't a big deal "Because everyone worth working for was requiring them anyway." So, even if it was not mandated, you had to have it or you'd be working in some toilet hole.
    For new grads.
  13. by   kcochrane
    Quote from AutumnApple
    I have a friend from NY and she said the mandate wasn't a big deal "Because everyone worth working for was requiring them anyway." So, even if it was not mandated, you had to have it or you'd be working in some toilet hole.
    Maybe in NYC or some other areas. In my area - upstate NY, a BSN is not a requirement. In fact they prefer to hire from the local community college because "those students are ready to hit the floor". So it will be a big deal for this area. At least you get 10 years to get your BSN, so I like that part. It will be interesting to see how this works out. I'm grandfathered, but I'm only a few credits away from a BSN if I ever get my butt in motion and finish them. I currently work for one of the major hospital systems in the Rochester area. They still employ and hire many ASNs.
  14. by   Workitinurfava
    Will a BSN from University of Phoenix count?

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