Nursing Uniform Theories.

  1. I am doing a study on the Nursing Uniform Theories.The transition from white to coloured uniforms.Any info would be greatly appreciated.And maybe on a personal level,how do you feel wearing coloured uniforms instead of whites?

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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   spitfire
    I AM GLAD THAT WE CAN WEAR COLORED SCRUBS, IT WAS BAD ENOUGH WEARING WHITE AS A STUDENT-YOU STUCK OUT LIKE A POUNDED THUMB- SO EVERYONE KNEW WHO YOU WERE.I FEEL THAT COLOR IS NOT AS INTIMIDATING AS WHITE, I KNOW MANY OLDER FOLKS LIKE THE WHITE. LETS FACE IT WHITE NEVER STAYS WHITE FOR VERY LONG.
  4. by   pandora
    I would love to wear coloured scrobs, but, unfortunately, we still get issued with white dresses where I work. They are a pain because, although they may look fresh and clean at the beginning of the shift, they don't stay that way for long.

    We can also wear royal blue pants with a white tunic top, which is what I always go for, but it's almost identical to what our physiotherapists wear. Scrubs would be so much more comfortable and practical.
  5. by   M.Davis
    [I have been in nursing for the past 22 years and have seen and heard the results of wearing the white uniforms and the colored. Although I have fallen into color mode I much prefer white.However, unless you always want to wear white pants and tops it is very difficult to have choices.I am finding it almost impossible to find the white dress uniforms of days gone by.The majority of my older patients really miss the white dresses and even the caps.Of course, the younger generation of patients really seem to like the different colors and patterns.Oh, how times have changed! QUOTE]Originally posted by Embibi:
    I am doing a study on the Nursing Uniform Theories.The transition from white to coloured uniforms.Any info would be greatly appreciated.And maybe on a personal level,how do you feel wearing coloured uniforms instead of whites?

    [/QUOTE]

  6. by   Mary H.
    When I started as a nurse 26+ years ago (Wisconsin), we were wearing variations of white (colored top, white pants), but we had to wear hats - YUK. The hats went away with the advent of male RNs - no one I knew was brave enough to tell them they needed to wear a hat. I don't like white personally, it is not a strong color. I like to wear clothing that compliments me and makes me look as good as I can. IMO, having prescribed colors or types of uniforms takes away from me as a person and makes me feel like a factory worker. Even the "uniform" of corporate America allows for some individuality! I think the reasons for prescribing a particular uniform are mainly to promote conformity and compliance - the same reasons schools keep looking at or going to uniforms.
  7. by   JillR
    A comment in a previous post said that wearing a prescribed color make them feel like a factory worker. This remided me of something. At the hospital I work at, all of the RN's LPN's and CNA's are now called "line staff". WOW, i just cound't help but make a comment on that one.....how appropriate!!!!!

    Sometimes I feel as if my patients are on an assembly line.
  8. by   spitfire
    IN RESPONCE TO THE LAST 2 MAESSAGES,THE HOSPITAL WHERE I HAD WORKED DECIDED TO RE-NAME THE STAFF. THE NURSES WERE CALLED "CLINICAL ASSOCIATES" AND THE CNA'S "CARE ASSOCIATES".THE MD'S WERE WONDERING WHAT THEY WERE GOING TO BE CALLED.I THINK PART OF THIS WAS BECAUSE THEY ELIMINATED THE LPN POSITION(BUT THEY STILL WORKED THERE) AND THE CNAS TOOK ON SOME OF THEIR ROLES SO THEY HAD TO REMNAME THE 2.THE PATIENTS WERE CONFUSED TO SAY THE LEAST AND MANY HAD A GOOD LAUGH"YOUR CALLED WHAT!" SO MANAGEMENT CHANGED IT BACK EXCEPT FOR THE CNA'S AT THE TIME I REFUSED TO BE CALLED A CARE ASSOCIATE (I AM A RN NOW)- FEELING LIKE I WORKED AT WAL-MART " HI I'M YOUR CARE ASSOCIATE WELCOME TO THE HOSPITAL" I DON'T THINK SO. SPITFIRE
  9. by   ganurse
    This is so interesting!!

    During my last year of nursing school (last year), for my research project, my group studied this same subject. Color vs. Whites and the patient's perception.

    Our study found, regardless of the age of the participants, nurses were identified by a white uniform. It was shown that a colored uniform was not readily identifible as a nurse by patients.

    But when we studied the nurses perceptions, whites were identified with cafeteria workers and housekeeping, not nurses.

    The caps were definately OUT!

    Personally, I enjoy wearing a variety of colors (my unit does not have a specific color or pattern). But those times when I do where white, patients always comment that they like nurses in white.

    I know that if we were ever asked to go back to wearing whites, I'd be the first person on the front line fighting the change.

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