Nursing: Then and Now - pg.2 | allnurses

Nursing: Then and Now - page 2

Looking back to when I was in nursing school, and then starting my nursing career, I remember many things that are no longer in use, or things that have transformed over the years. Gone are the days... Read More

  1. Visit  tigerlogic profile page
    12
    One of my profs said they used to do surgery on premie babies without anesthesia because science thought they couldn't feel pain! She used this as an example of that they'll teach us lots of stuff in school but we must keep re-examining ideas and learning.
    VampyrSlayer, CountessB, uRNmyway, and 9 others like this.
  2. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    27
    "Nurses had to calculate the drip rate using the second hand on their watch and a roller clamp to regulate the flow"

    Knowing how to manually (or mentally) calcuate drip rates and regulate flow is skill that IMHO all nurses should know and keep keen upon. You never know where your practice will take you and or under what conditions you will be nursing.

    Everthing from terrorist attacks and natural disasters to simply a poorly run facility, you'll never know when you're going to be short of even absent of pumps and going to have to go "old school".
  3. Visit  echoRNC711 profile page
    12
    Nursery Nursing IRELAND 1983

    Starched veils that peaked above our head.

    No make up , hair showing or any jewelry

    Mandatory slip under uniform

    Gentian violet to treat thrush mouth

    Putting jars of table salt into hot bath to clean wounds

    Folding bed linen,nappies (cloth diapers )in the sluice room

    Standing in as God-mother if pt needed baptized ( Hospital was run by nuns,)

    3weeks on straight (12 hr days ) 1 week off

    Pay 100 (Irish ) pounds a month equivalent to about $150 where we had to say "Thank you so much Sister "
  4. Visit  lindarn profile page
    10
    I remember, for clinical, we used to wear the white Clinic Nursing shoes. After I polished my shoes the night before, I would dip the white shoelaces in Clorox, to get them white! We were inspected in the morning before we went out on the wards!

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    NutmeggeRN, Teacup Pom, 1feistymama, and 7 others like this.
  5. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    6




    Ah yes..........Clinic brand shoes. I remember them well.
  6. Visit  CrazierThanYou profile page
    2
    Quote from tnbutterfly




    Ah yes..........Clinic brand shoes. I remember them well.
    Were they comfy?
    NutmeggeRN and merlee like this.
  7. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    5
    Quote from CrazierThanYou
    Were they comfy?
    Yes they were and they lasted forever, at least through 4 years of nursing school.
    NutmeggeRN, meanmaryjean, GrnTea, and 2 others like this.
  8. Visit  Pepper The Cat profile page
    19
    Multi-dose bottles of meds.
    One nurse would give meds to all pts.
    The med room was stocked with many, many multi-dose bottles of meds.

    Isolation meant the pt did NOT leave the room.

    Isolation meant double bagging everything - a "dirty" nurse inside the room would hold out a laundry bag while the
    "clean nurse" held out a second laundry bag. The dirty nurse would put their laundry bag into the clean laundry bag. This was repeated for garbage. Meal trays were 100% disposable. I still say we should go back to these practices!
    Junebug903, Cinquefoil, uRNmyway, and 16 others like this.
  9. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    5
    Quote from tnbutterfly




    Ah yes..........Clinic brand shoes. I remember them well.
    Also known as "Nurse's Regulation" shoe and still in production.

    CLINIC SHOES : THE CLASSIC NURSING SHOE

    With all this emphasis on patient "customer service" from the federal goverment you girls could perhaps find yourselves back in those shoes, along with whites and caps in the near future! *LOL*
  10. Visit  merlee profile page
    7
    Going back to whites would not be all bad. But no caps - they didn't get cleaned often enough, and men don't wear them.

    Clean shoes would be nice.
  11. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    3
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    "Nurses had to calculate the drip rate using the second hand on their watch and a roller clamp to regulate the flow"

    Knowing how to manually (or mentally) calcuate drip rates and regulate flow is skill that IMHO all nurses should know and keep keen upon. You never know where your practice will take you and or under what conditions you will be nursing.

    Everthing from terrorist attacks and natural disasters to simply a poorly run facility, you'll never know when you're going to be short of even absent of pumps and going to have to go "old school".
    Old school IV bonus round questions:

    What were the patented names of several manual flow rate regulators? What were their advantages over simple screw or roller devices? What was their usual general accuracy flow rate for gravity infused fluids (ml./hr)?

    Finally who were JV AC 280 and Epic 100?
    NutmeggeRN, NRSKarenRN, and lindarn like this.
  12. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    6
    Quote from merlee
    Going back to whites would not be all bad. But no caps - they didn't get cleaned often enough, and men don't wear them.

    Clean shoes would be nice.
    Modern Kay's "Perma-Starch" caps require nothing more than a swishing in soapy water, rinsed and laid flat to dry. Perhaps ironing with a cool iron if you've got that kind of time. *LOL*

    Now if you want to go old school get yourself a box of Argo, Faultless or Linit powdered starch and knock yourself out! *LOL*
    VampyrSlayer, NRSKarenRN, Dalzac, and 3 others like this.
  13. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    9
    Some of these may have been mentioned . . .

    Laundry would send up a gigantic stack of unfolded cloth diapers. All the nurses pitched in to fold them when we had a spare minute. Disposable diapers only used for very young or babies on strict I and O. We weighed the Pampers (Huggies hadn't been invented yet :-)) and stacked them up, weighed again after baby voided.

    Most of our IVs were a butterfly in a scalp vein with a Dixie Cup cut in half taped on to protect the site. (some of the babes looked right jaunty in their paper cup hats).

    Suction machines had glass cannisters, trach care was done with a pre-sterilized cloth wrapped packs with 3 glass cups, hemostat, pipe cleaners, gauze, etc. All trachs were metal.

    Isolation gowns were cloth, too. Just about everything that is plastic or paper now was at one time glass or metal, it seems. We did not sharpen and re-use needles, though.

    No computers, just paper and typewriters as mentioned. Charts were a 3-ring binder. Everyone (doctors, nurses, social workers etc) wrote their "SOAP" notes in the progress notes. I really liked that.

    Smallpox vaccine.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Oct 23, '12 : Reason: changed the t to a d in the word "send"


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