Nursing Student says hello! - page 2

Hi all, I am new to this board, I think sites like this is great! I am a 34 y/o male nursing student. I am about to complete my first semester! (WooHoo!) We started out with 25 student's in our... Read More

  1. by   ManyHatsToWear
    I'm in the same semester as you are (woo-hoo), but I'm not a guy! We started the semester with 4 guys in our whole program, and now we're down to 2. I had clinicals with a group of 8 people, 2 of which were guys. One dropped out, but the other one loves all the attention he gets from everyone! I work at a hospital now and know a lot of very caring, funny and interesting male nurses. They definately put a different spin on care and it's refreshing to have some testosterone to break-up the mostly female environment a little bit! Good luck this semester!
  2. by   Rileycat
    Hey, Robert]...

    I am a nursing student in my final semester, due to graduate in May. My program started out with approx. 85-90 people and we are down to 35 students, 1 of which is a male. the females try to include the male as often as possible, but I think he still feels a little out of place.

    I personally enjoy having male classmates and wish we had some more in our program. Too many females in one place is not always a good thing.

    I was curious about the interpersonal relationships at other schools. In my program, most of us nursing students sit together no matter what age or ethnic group, which I think is great. However, I am noticing a lot of cattiness between certain cliques. It seems some people have nothing better to do than rip each other to shreds (behind their backs of course). There is a lot of competition also.

    I think the nursing program is tough and it's a shame that people can't act as a support system to one another. What worries me is that I see a lot of this in my clinical settings and I fear it will be that way at whatever hospital I choose to work at. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to deal with this? I know I've strayed a bit off the topic, but I just wanted to let you know that you're not the only one who has to deal with cliques.

    Anyway, welcome to nursing! In my past experiences (as a patient), my male nurses and aides have been spectacular. I think you'll do great in this field and I wish you success!
  3. by   eventsnyc
    Can any one tell why the drop out rate is so high? What are the reasons they drop out? Thanks
  4. by   Mijourney
    Hi Robert. Welcome. Yes, you will stand out in nursing because of your gender. You will encounter challenges in your practice as many of us do based on things such as appearance, political viewpoint, personal lifestyle, ethnicity, work setting, and yes, even nursing titles. Don't let that rattle your chain. You have come into nursing with a positive attitude and hopefully to make a postive difference in someone's life. That's commendable and should be your primary focus. Best wishes for your success as you continue your journey.
  5. by   laura ann
    Originally posted by eventsnyc:
    Can any one tell why the drop out rate is so high? What are the reasons they drop out? Thanks
    I am only in my first year, but it seems to be the pattern that most drop outs are in the first year. You really really have to be dedicated to getting through nursing school because it can be physically and emotionally tough. I dont know if it is harder for older student than younger ones but it seems that its a trade off, Experience and stability for youth and energy. the coursework is a whole different story (difficult) but if you stick it out it begins to fall into place, like a big jigsaw puzzle one bit at a time. I still dont know how I will ever ever work alone as a nurse but I hope that is the same fear every first year student feels.
  6. by   Tim-GNP
    The reason for drop outs in nursing programs are many. The most often cited is the realization of what the profession entails. Many students have unrealistic expectations as to what nursing is and isn't.

    Another semester where there were higher levels of drop outs was peds/ob/gyn. It is a very special set of knowledge and skills [and I take my hats off to all ob/gyn & peds nurses, because they have a knowledge I could never have]! But I know we lost at least a dozen students when I was in school in that rotation. I had 3.5-4.0 in all of my nursing coursework, but I had no interest in ob/gyn & peds. That semester, I finished with a perfect 75%- I was afraid it would have kept me out of Sigma Theta Tau [thank goodness it didn't].

    The bottom line is, if you are committed and serious about becoming a nurse, NOTHING will be able to stop you. Good luck and keep studying.
  7. by   Tim-GNP
    The reason for drop outs in nursing programs are many. The most often cited is the realization of what the profession entails. Many students have unrealistic expectations as to what nursing is and isn't.

    Another semester where there were higher levels of drop outs was peds/ob/gyn. It is a very special set of knowledge and skills [and I take my hats off to all ob/gyn & peds nurses, because they have a knowledge I could never have]! But I know we lost at least a dozen students when I was in school in that rotation. I had 3.5-4.0 in all of my nursing coursework, but I had no interest in ob/gyn & peds. That semester, I finished with a perfect 75%- I was afraid it would have kept me out of Sigma Theta Tau [thank goodness it didn't].

    The bottom line is, if you are committed and serious about becoming a nurse, NOTHING will be able to stop you. Good luck and keep studying.
  8. by   Rileycat
    For eventsnyc:

    I agree with some of the others that there are many reasons for people to drop out of the nursing program.

    I think many people don't realize what a time commitment is involved to succeed in this program. Many sacrifices must be made and not everyone is willing to do that. I also believe that people don't know what they are getting themselves into. Nursing can be very mentally and physically exhausting, therefore the people in it for "a quick and easy buck" bail out quickly.

    I go to a local community college with a great age variation. The biggest reason for dropping out at my school is simply life circumstances. The finances are not there, a family member gets a terminal illness, a single mom has no one to watch her kids, etc. I think another huge factor is that people bite off more than they can chew. They think they can be in nursing school full time and work full time. No one is superman so this doesn't work very often. Eventually something must give and since bills need to be paid, school is often dropped.

    I'd like to add that the most successful students at my school are the older ones who are finally returning to school now that their own children have graduated. These folks have such dedication and desire. I really admire them not only for their success, but for having the courage to return to school after all these years. My hat also goes off to all the moms out there who are in the program. I can't imagine the energy it must take to accomplish your goals. You guys do it all...care for the kids, maintain the household, laundry, cooking, quality time with the family, and then study on top of all that. Bless you all!

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