Nursing schools question....

  1. Hello every one. I am currently attending a community college taking all the prerequisite classes to enter the RN program. From reading the post here it seems it would be best to "get my feet wet" as a MA or LVN. So I decided to go for the LVN program. Once I decide to enter the RN program is it best to stick to the community college education or is a specialty/trade school like University of Phoenix or Meric College equal in credibility. First post here, hope it make sense. -Jaime
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Dizzle
    I would highly recommend you to stick with what you're doing right now--taking prereqs for the RN program. In the RN program, they will teach you nursing skills to pass the n-clex and clinicals will provide the experience you need (if you're concern about "getting your feet wet"). Vocational school for LVN is way too expensive and with the amount that you will be paying, might as well stick with the community college and go straight for your RN degree.

    The downfall might be the waiting list at your community college for the RN program. Even though some Vocational schools may be difficult to get in, the chances of you getting inis much more greater than community college's program. If this is the case, then maybe you would like to do some research on the nearest vocational school.

    But if you're patient and willing to work hard in your prereq classes, then I say to go for it. Hope this helped you out a little.
  4. by   jlcole45
    I agree w Dizzy stick with your original plan and go for the RN. One thing you will spend about half the money you would have for the RN program to attend a LVN program. Plus you will only make a few dollars more an hour then then you would as a nursing assistant. Last you delay your RN education by at least a year and they will make you take over many of the fundamental nursing courses, which can be very frustrating.

    You have to do your own research on programs but I would look for RN programs that offer the most clinical time. That's were diploma and associate degree programs still out shine BSN programs. I speak with authority on this topic because I have both an Rn Diploma and a BSN.

    Get your feet wet by working as an aide in a hospital setting. LVN's often get relegated to nursing homes and such. I would only recommend that if you're interested in geriatic nursing.

    Sometimes one gets burnt out going to school and I've known several LVN's that decided never to to on for their RN's because they didn't want to return to school. Or if they do its on average 5 or so years later. So how long do you want to make a LVN wage?

    What do you want to be? A LVN or an RN.

    Decide and do it.
  5. by   TemeculaGuy
    Quote from Dizzle
    I would highly recommend you to stick with what you're doing right now--taking prereqs for the RN program. In the RN program, they will teach you nursing skills to pass the n-clex and clinicals will provide the experience you need (if you're concern about "getting your feet wet"). Vocational school for LVN is way too expensive and with the amount that you will be paying, might as well stick with the community college and go straight for your RN degree.

    The downfall might be the waiting list at your community college for the RN program. Even though some Vocational schools may be difficult to get in, the chances of you getting inis much more greater than community college's program. If this is the case, then maybe you would like to do some research on the nearest vocational school.

    But if you're patient and willing to work hard in your prereq classes, then I say to go for it. Hope this helped you out a little.
    Thanks for the info. The community college I attend actually offers the LVN course:http://www.msjc.edu/alliedhealth/lvn1.htm. I calculated the the highest possible cost, according to the website, is $2020, not too bad. The prerequisites are significantly less for the LVN program than RN program. Ive just been reading that its a good idea to start off as LVN then transition to RN.
  6. by   TemeculaGuy
    Quote from jlcole45

    What do you want to be? A LVN or an RN.

    Decide and do it.
    I want to be an RN. I'm just contemplating doing the LVN program because all my prerequisites are pretty much done for this and still have 4 prereques left to apply for the RN. With a full time job it makes it hard. Also another reason for the LVN pays more than my current job, I searched around and average pay for lvn around my area was $14-18.
  7. by   catzy5
    Quote from TemeculaGuy
    Thanks for the info. The community college I attend actually offers the LVN course:http://www.msjc.edu/alliedhealth/lvn1.htm. I calculated the the highest possible cost, according to the website, is $2020, not too bad. The prerequisites are significantly less for the LVN program than RN program. Ive just been reading that its a good idea to start off as LVN then transition to RN.

    Hi Temeculaguy,
    I just got accepted to the RN program at this school, I start in January. I was in the same boat as you tossing up the Lvn vs Rn because it is so competitive and so few seats, I figured though you have to get the pre reqs done regardless if you plan to go on to the RN level, so I thought I would do them all first see how I do and then decide which program to try for. I ended up getting A's in all the pre reqs so went ahead and applied and got in to the RN program.

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