Nursing Question

  1. I am interested in going back to school to get my nursing degree. I would like to know the difference between a RN and a BSN.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Shamrock
    2 years of school is about it.
  4. by   traumaRUs
    An RN is a registered nurse which you can get by doing an ADN (associates degree nurse) takes about 2 years and a BSN nurse which is a bachelors degree nurse and that takes 4 years. I would do BSN if I had to do it all over again.
  5. by   Vsummer1
    Originally posted by nrollins
    I am interested in going back to school to get my nursing degree. I would like to know the difference between a RN and a BSN.
    BSN is a bachelor's degree, ADN is an associates degree. These are two ways to qualify to be an RN. The 3rd way is a diploma program. After you graduate from an accredited program, you are then eligible to take your boards to become a Registered Nurse, or RN.

    You can have a BSN/ADN/Diploma and not be an RN. You MUST pass the NCLEX to be an RN.
  6. by   RN always
    With a BSN you can do public health nursing or school nursing or go on to get a masters. With a ADN you cannot do public health or school nursing. The pay rate is usually the same, depending on where you are. Depending on what your long term plans are will help you decide. I did the ADN b/c I am 38 years old and I wanted to start working right away instead of 2 more years of school. I figured I could work 2 years and make $40,000 a year instead of going to school and paying for 2 more years of school. BUT if I were younger I would have done the BSN. Good luck
  7. by   Elenaster
    I would just like to add if you already have a BA or BS in another area, it is quite possible that you can "fast track" to your BSN. I already had a BA when I started nursing school and got my BSN in six semesters. There are fast track programs popping up all over the country to help address the nursing shortage. From what I can tell, these programs are geared towards non-traditional students looking to make a career change.

    Additionally, some employers will consider a BA/BS with an ADN the equivalent of a BSN. That's what my sister has and it certainly has not limited her career options.

    Hope this helps!

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